My Tele needs a replacement neck, tips needed.

Nextguitar

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You probably have a humidity problem. Do you monitor the humidity in the room or case where the guitar is stored? Buy a high quality calibrated hygrometer or three inexpensive ones (hoping that at least two will agree). Humidify the room or case if it drops severely in the winter.
 

TeleGS

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Hi, I see there are a couple really informative threads discussing neck replacements already, but seeing as my questions are slightly different I'll ask anyway. My US Telecaster's neck has been adjusted several times by good repair men, but every time the neck has gone wonky within weeks. I've been told that I should be looking for guitars and necks that were made in winter, as the Arctic climate is bad for guitar necks. Those of you who live in colder climes, do you have any tips for searching out a good replacement necks that can take the cold winters? Also, should I worry about getting a neck with the Fender logo?
Thanks in advance, Eilert
Before spending a lot I would check the relative humidity (RH) in the room you keep the guitar in and keep it away from heating ducts and space heaters. If your tech is setting it up in a shop with a humidity of around 40% and you are taking the guitar to a drier environment the neck will bend in a few days. Then you take it back and it is bent again and they adjust it again, and you take it home and in a few days it bends again. You don't need a really accurate measure of humidity, just a measure of change. Get a cheap hygrometer at the hardware store garden center and see if the humidity is changing in your home. If it is drier than 40% consider getting a humidifier and running it in the winter in the room you keep the guitar (~$20 at the drugstore). Also consider getting a small case humidifier.
Learn how to adjust the truss rod yourself - it is part of owning a modern guitar. Have someone show you how to measure neck relief and how to adjust it, and then set it up in your environment. If the neck goes out of alignment check to see if the humidity in the room has changed (probably) and either adjust the humidity or the truss rod. You can learn on YouTube too, but watch a number of videos to compare advice. Most of the time the problem is with the environment, and in your case you could spend money on another neck and have the same problem. GS
 

Arfage

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Thats not true. I got a Warmoth quartersawn maple neck last year with no "fancy" options and its the best quality neck Ive played so far. Cost me around $300.
It's very true. I'd been buying their stuff for thirty plus years so I know the difference. In 2021 I returned two that had so many mineral streaks they looked like they'd been dropped into a box of sharpies. The third one I just sold at a loss because their return process takes so long. It had a big brown streak that looked like it was cut from a skinny branch. Three junk necks in a row? No way that's an anomaly.
 

Blue Bill

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Before spending a lot I would check the relative humidity (RH) in the room you keep the guitar in and keep it away from heating ducts and space heaters. If your tech is setting it up in a shop with a humidity of around 40% and you are taking the guitar to a drier environment the neck will bend in a few days. Then you take it back and it is bent again and they adjust it again, and you take it home and in a few days it bends again. You don't need a really accurate measure of humidity, just a measure of change. Get a cheap hygrometer at the hardware store garden center and see if the humidity is changing in your home. If it is drier than 40% consider getting a humidifier and running it in the winter in the room you keep the guitar (~$20 at the drugstore). Also consider getting a small case humidifier.
Learn how to adjust the truss rod yourself - it is part of owning a modern guitar. Have someone show you how to measure neck relief and how to adjust it, and then set it up in your environment. If the neck goes out of alignment check to see if the humidity in the room has changed (probably) and either adjust the humidity or the truss rod. You can learn on YouTube too, but watch a number of videos to compare advice. Most of the time the problem is with the environment, and in your case you could spend money on another neck and have the same problem. GS
I live in Maine, I've had the same problem. I have about a dozen guitars, two are acoustic, the rest electrics. I've had a problem with only two of them, one acoustic, one a pawn-shop Squier Strat. I tried the hygrometer/humidifier route, I found it unworkable. The humidity in my house often gets under 15% in the winter. There's no way to counter that with a little wet thing in a guitar case. Of course, I'm a lazy goofball, and apparently unable to remember to re-hydrate the noodle every two days for the entire Winter, like you're supposed to.

There's some good suggestions here. I have a couple Musikraft necks, one quarter-sawn one plain-sawn, neither has any problems. Good luck!
 

smoggyama

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Don't overspend unless it involves a logo. Dressing is the critical factor imo.
 

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Michael

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USACG. I have five of their necks on guitars or basses & they’re terrific in every way. Plus, they have tons of options relative to profile & nut width. The original owner, Tommy Rosemond, was fantastic. They are now a subsidiary of MJT; current quality & service are exemplary. Any long time member can vouch for Mark & his refinishing expertise. Having USACG under their umbrella offers all kinds of possibilities. I might try Musikraft sometime, but not because of any dissatisfaction with USACG…
 

rockinstephen

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FWIW - I wanted a replacement neck for my Squier J Mascis Jazzmaster. There was nothing wrong with the stock neck; I wanted one with binding and block inlays. I found one on Ebay for $65.00 from China (I also found a decal). It was a quality neck with no rough fret edges. The plastic nut was junk so I had a bone nut made along with a professional set up at the local guitar store. My point is, you don't need to break the bank to find a good neck...
 

telemnemonics

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Need more specifics than "gone wonky"!

I live in the cold North during winter and have to run a humidifier during the winter season or all my necks gain relief or bow more so the action gets higher.
If i adjust the neck to the dry winter, it will move the other way in spring and lose relief or gain back bow so the action gets lower.

A proper guitar tech runs a humidifier in their shop because guitars need proper humidity.

So while the guitar is in the shop (if its there a week or two) it regains moisture, swells and bows back.
If home humidity level is then very dry it will move again when you get it home.

Some necks are skinny, some necks are more sensitive to humidity.
If the techs can adjust the neck to play well, its not a bad neck.
You could buy a new neck and still have it move on you if subjected to drastic humidity changes.
Huge fat necks move less but may still move.

My sense is that decades ago neck wood was better seasoned and more stable, because the lumber industry was different, and old time luthier customs directed wood to be stored for years before milling into guitar parts.
 

GGardner

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I had a humpy bowed neck straightened at www.warpedneck.com.
Saved the vintage value and made it very playable again.

Wow. Never heard of them. I have a Fender neck that needs to be fixed! I hope they're still in business. $75 plus shipping sure beats the Warmouth route! I actually took it to a local guy years ago and the improvement was barely perceptible. But he's a great guy and tried his best so I just said, "Thanks so much!" and paid him.
 

noname_dragon

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Wow. Never heard of them. I have a Fender neck that needs to be fixed! I hope they're still in business. $75 plus shipping sure beats the Warmouth route! I actually took it to a local guy years ago and the improvement was barely perceptible. But he's a great guy and tried his best so I just said, "Thanks so much!" and paid him.
yep warped neck is the real deal. Hardly anyone knows about it, even my local luthier, who has condemned necks to the trash. For me with my '79 MM Stingray bass with a neck that had a bow, stuck truss rod, and mid-rise at the 12th fret... Warped neck put it in a jig with heat and ironed out all the issues. Still great after several years.
 

gb Custom Shop

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As others have stated, proper humidity is key. Winter is neither better or worse to build a guitar, as long as humidity is managed. Dimensionally stable wood also helps a lot!
 

coolrene

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Looks like he just repackages Alparts & Mighty-Mite necks…?

Musikraft does a great neck…1/4 sawn 👍
I like the way they shape the heel. More Fender looking! A beefier neck will offer more stability than a thinner one.

As for a decal: use your own discretion!
Most shops will frown upon putting a Fender decal on an aftermarket neck…
He does more than repackaging: he reconditions, adjusts, and delivers fully functional necks. Mine was just perfect, the screwholes from previous tuners had been filled, no fret sprouts. Packaging was bulletproof.
This guy knows his business and delivers !
 

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MalcolmTex

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I have an early 1980's Fender Tele with a neck bow. Have had it looked at by a few great techs and they all confirm it and try various means to work around it. I have to string it with 10's (I usually play 11s). Anyway, Id love to just get a Fender replacement neck, however, the serial number is on the headstock as well. Replacement neck would have no serial number. I would never have a means of proving the age of the guitar should I choose to sell it, unless I provide the original neck with the sale.
 

itstooloudMike

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I have an early 1980's Fender Tele with a neck bow. Have had it looked at by a few great techs and they all confirm it and try various means to work around it. I have to string it with 10's (I usually play 11s). Anyway, Id love to just get a Fender replacement neck, however, the serial number is on the headstock as well. Replacement neck would have no serial number. I would never have a means of proving the age of the guitar should I choose to sell it, unless I provide the original neck with the sale.
I decided to replace the stock neck on my 2001 American Limited Edition Tele with a neck to my specs from Warmoth. I am keeping the original neck for the reasons you stated. But the guitar plays so much better with the new Warmoth neck, I probably won’t ever sell it anyway. The “upgrade” turned a good Tele into a fantastic Tele, and only cost me roughly $325. If I ever do decide to sell the guitar, I’ll put the original neck back on, and either keep the Warmoth, or make it available to the purchaser for an additional cost. But honestly, with the original neck, the guitar wasn’t my favorite to play. With the Warmoth, it is!
 




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