My Tele needs a replacement neck, tips needed.

Elliot the Viking

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Hi, I see there are a couple really informative threads discussing neck replacements already, but seeing as my questions are slightly different I'll ask anyway. My US Telecaster's neck has been adjusted several times by good repair men, but every time the neck has gone wonky within weeks. I've been told that I should be looking for guitars and necks that were made in winter, as the Arctic climate is bad for guitar necks. Those of you who live in colder climes, do you have any tips for searching out a good replacement necks that can take the cold winters? Also, should I worry about getting a neck with the Fender logo?
Thanks in advance, Eilert
 

Peegoo

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Also, should I worry about getting a neck with the Fender logo?

Howdy Elliot. Some necks are problematic no matter where they are in the world. A guitar with a particularly 'whippy' (flexible) neck will be a never-ending source of frustration. Whippy necks just happen, and brand does not matter. In general terms: the thinner a neck is, the greater the chance it will be excessively flexible.

Also, a little-known issue that is rarely discussed anywhere is the fact that some guitar bodies change geometry through their length as temperature and humidity change. This affects string action over the frets. It's not common, but I've run across this problem a few times.

Having a competent tech evaluate the root cause of the issue is the first thing to do.

If a neck replacement is necessary, you have to decide what is the most important to you:

A. Having a guitar that withstands the conditions where you live; it is reliable, stays in tune, and makes the sorts of sounds you like.

B. Having a Fender logo on the headstock. This matters to most Fender fans because it lends credibility to them as a player. They know guitarists are judgmental and form opinions about a person's skill based on the guitar they play...not the sounds they actually make with it.

And go from there.

Ultimately, a good tech will work with you to help you determine what kind of neck carve feels best to you, what fret size you prefer, etc. This is the reason why--when considering options to have your guitar worked on--that 'best price' is never a good index in the decision process. A decent tech that knows their stuff is rarely if ever the cheapest. Go cheap and you'll end up paying more over the long run. A good tech will help you quickly zero in on what's best, rather than try a series of things over time that end up costing you more.
 

Nick Fanis

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I've been told that I should be looking for guitars and necks that were made in winter

What else are we going to read in the internetS?
:)
Posting photos of your guitar would really help us to help you btw.
At least we will know if you guitar has a single or double truss rod and take it from there.
 

brookdalebill

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Howdy and welcome.
I lived in northern British Columbia for a decade, and toured western Canada for 3 years.
My main guitar at the time had a Philip Kubicki neck, made of flame maple, in Santa Barbara, California.
Except for a few truss rod adjustments, it was fine.
Perhaps you just got a bad neck.
It happens, though it’s not common.
Warmoth necks are very well made, and you can choose lots of options.
I’ve owned many over the years.
They’re not cheap, but they are extremely well made, and very stable, IMO.
 
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nojazzhere

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Hi, I see there are a couple really informative threads discussing neck replacements already, but seeing as my questions are slightly different I'll ask anyway. My US Telecaster's neck has been adjusted several times by good repair men, but every time the neck has gone wonky within weeks. I've been told that I should be looking for guitars and necks that were made in winter, as the Arctic climate is bad for guitar necks. Those of you who live in colder climes, do you have any tips for searching out a good replacement necks that can take the cold winters? Also, should I worry about getting a neck with the Fender logo?
Thanks in advance, Eilert
I've never heard that about necks being made in the winter.....???? Is that like advice to never buy a car made on a Monday or Friday?
I agree that it needs to be evaluated by a GOOD repairman. You said it's been adjusted several times, but not what the diagnosis or reason for problem was? Is the trussrod slipping? Is the neck twisting or bowing?
Good luck....and please keep us informed. :)
 

eallen

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"Necks built in the winter". The guy wasn't wearing a tinfoil hat when he said it by chance?

Bad necks can be built any time of year as can good ones. Shops may be dryer in the winter from furnaces running but if wood is properly dried, moisture checked, and acclimated before use it won't matter.

A more precise description of wonky would be helpful as well as any pics. Does it twist, back now, too much relief?
 

mmannaxx

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I have used a couple of Allparts Fender licensed necks for Tele builds. Both have been fine and one is extremely big, as in bigger than a custom shop Nocaster neck. I would guess that all things being equal a bigger neck would be more stable than a smaller or thinner neck. But i am no expert.
 

dimenjj

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If a Fender Logo really matters, (possible re-sell down the road) then you need to purchase a Fender Factory Replacement from a dealer. If not, I have purchased many Tele necks from Warmoth and never received a bad one.
 

coolrene

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Only one place to go: Cody Gleason at Deep Ellum Guitarworks (lookup his Reverb shop): great necks, good prices, super customer service !
Plus Cody is a real nice guy :) just ask him if you don't find what you're looking for in display
 

gavquinn

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Thicker the better, if you can accept a fat neck yourself, if you're happy to play it. Quartersawn timber tends to be more stable, a lot more stable, in my experience. The combination of the two helps.

Some say 'roasted maple' is 'more stable', but I don't know. I've had a Tom Anderson and a Suhr with roasted maple, I couldn't say they required less adjustment by dint of being roasted maple, but I have experienced better stability with fatter, quartersawn necks.
 

Caevan O'Sh!te

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If you DO wind up having to replace that neck, go for a Roasted Quartersawn Maple neck. Extremely stable, rigid and stiff. Figure (or none), one-piece or with a separate fretboard, as you like.

You can get a Roasted Quartersawn Maple Tele neck from Warmoth, in a variety of fretboard radius choices (including several Compound Radius options). They're licensed by Fender, and I would not be surprised if some Fender necks- individually, or stock/original on some Fender guitars- were made by Warmoth, for Fender.

If ordering one from Warmoth, select "Roasted Maple", then add in notes a special request that you'd like a Roasted Quartersawn Maple neck, along with any other details that fall between the provided options. They'll email you and square things away to finalize your order.
 

Mark1406

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I have toyed with the idea of changing necks on a guitar I like to get the shape I like rather than buy and sell guitars.

Regards

Mark
 

CodyGleason

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Second vote for quarter sawn maple. It is more stable and can withstand more extreme climate changes. Of course all necks are different and are susceptible to warping or twisting based on their individual physical growth conditions. Aside from obvious characteristics like grain direction and knots, no one would be able to predict this except for the guy who cut the tree down and milled the board. Otherwise, quartersawn is the safest bet.
A74E7489-1D34-441E-A01D-E0CEDA9461F8.jpeg
 

Okieactor

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Warmoth is good, other brands are good too.

Quartersawn may help, I would not choose roasted. Roasted means hard, but also brittle.

Fatter is more stable, generally. Warmoth has like a ‘59 Roundback contour that is nice.

Double action truss rod, as others have said.

Have a competent tech set it up, but also learn how to adjust a truss rod (strings loose, 1/4 turn max per day). Watch YouTube on it. If temp and humidity are changing, your guitar may need more frequent minor adjustments.
 

lavrgs

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I had my neck modified to use a spoke wheel truss adjustment - saves taking the neck off several times a year...note this is a custom built "tele" with a 22 fret nut. Similar arrangements are on Music Man versions
 

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