my son wants a 1999-2003 Ford 7.3 Diesel Pickup

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by getbent, Nov 6, 2013.

  1. getbent

    getbent Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I will take you at your word that you 'will never get it'.

    I have a very good friend who comes from a fairly small country (in physical size) in europe. When he took a trip across the US he was flabbergasted over the vastness and expanse of the country. In the western US, we tend to drive great distances on a regular basis and lots of our stuff is really big.

    Do I think that my son's desire is a great idea? heck no! Hence the thread.... and from the reading and research on these vehicles tells me that some diesel engines have better reliability than others. My diesel mechanic friend tells me the 7.3 could easily run 500K miles. So, finding one with 200K and cleaning it up... well, it might be a reliable truck.

    I have been to Europe. It is amazing and full of wonderful people and cities that have been there a really long time.... cities that were not designed for cars at all and so, by necessity, the narrow streets support small cars.

    Where I live everything is BIG. There is space. and folks like to haul big stuff and move cattle and carry large loads and usually over a huge range of terrain (there is an average of a 10 degree fahrenheit difference between where i work and where I live!)

    For the most part, people aren't dumb and trends begin for a reason and things play out for a reason...

    I have sent jeep parts to a guy in England who desires a big dumb old jeep and has spent a bunch of money to build it... and I dig it... people should have some fun in this life and enjoy some things...

    When the bills get high enough for the boy, he'll decide a regular old F150 with the eco stuff makes sense... and he'll pretty easily find a buyer for his big truck.
     
  2. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    That economy is due to the little 5.3l gas engine having to pull the weight of the truck. My brother's '97 is a 4x4 crew cab one ton, and with the 7.3 diesel he gets close to 20MPG on the highway and mid teens in town-and this is a truck that weighs 9,000lbs empty.

    He's also currently making about 450HP and 800lbs of torque, which means that this truck also hauls ass when you put the hammer down.
     
  3. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I have owned my diesel truck since 1999. In that time I have had to replace two U-joints, a clutch slave cylinder, and a transmission rear seal.

    Parts ARE more expensive than gas drivetrain components, but they last MUCH longer because everything is heavy duty.
     
  4. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Wouldn't Australians have the same mindset if it was about practicality? All the practical reasons you give are mirrored in Australia.

    So why don't we drive 7.3L monsters as private vehicles? Keep in mind we have roadtrains here.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Slow Reflexes

    Slow Reflexes Poster Extraordinaire

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    We have those here, too. Triples, anyway.

    I assumed in the land of Mad Max you still had some privately owned monsters. If people haul cattle and big stuff for big projects over a huge variety of terrain there, what do they use if not big vehicles?
     
  6. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Normal sized ones.

    My point I was making to GB was that you can talk about practicality due to a big country, but the reality of the situation is cheap fuel - not practicality.

    An F350 as a personal vehicle is not a necessity anywhere else in the world - even in the other huge countries.

    It is a luxury, not a necessity - let's be honest - telling Eurpoeans that their countries are not suited to HUGE personal vehicles and that's why they don't buy them is daft.

    They don't buy them because they are strongly discouraged to be that wasteful.
     
  7. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Part of it may be the cultural mindset, I know way, WAY too many people that buy these large trucks strictly for the status thing. When Ford introduced the Excursion SUV, they were gobbled up by the "look at me" folks who simply HAD to have the biggest truck in the neighborhood.

    There are also way too many large 4x4s rolling around on huge tires that will never leave the pavement, and though I understand that some people need to go to these extremes to compensate for their insecurities, they are the ones that really support the argument of how impractical having a large truck can be.

    In my brother's case, he has a wife, three kids, and two dogs, and uses his truck to pull a camping trailer. He pretty much needs the large cab to fit all of the bodies in a manner where long trips aren't a cramped-up moan-fest.

    So if we're to generalize about Americans and large trucks, there are two large demographics to take into account: Those that actually DO need the capacity and power, and those (that unfortunately make up the majority of the owners) that are doing so strictly for vanity reasons.
     
  8. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Thank you for injecting some reality into this thread!
     
  9. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Well, it's important that the vanity factor is addressed, but it is also important that it is addressed objectively as being only one portion of the owners of large vehicles with large engines. In my opinion, the vanity owners really do more than their fair share to give credibility to the arguments against owning war wagons, but it isn't really fair to those that do have practical reasons for owning them.
     
  10. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I hear you, but that brings up the situation that people in Australia must be not capable of achieving what they need to without them.

    This isn't the case. My point is that even the "practical" reasons have a level of vanity or misplaced "necessity".

    Why do Australians who need to "haul huge loads across a vast country" not own them as private vehicles? If I may, I'd like to try to answer that: because a 4.2L diesel is adequate to tow a MASSIVE load; a 7.3L is excessive.

    I'm not saying people shouldn't buy them and enjoy owning them, I'm indicating that some people use necessity as a weak reason for owning a vehicle that makes them feel powerful.
     
  11. sparkletele123

    sparkletele123 Tele-Meister

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    I drive a Ford Ranger and my dad is a Texan. I love trucks too!
     
  12. av8theskies

    av8theskies Tele-Meister

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    Well, Im from the Great State of Texas...so heres mho lol
    Bettervto have the power to pull my horses, cattle, tractors and hay and not need it than to pull up in a "normal" vehicle and say wtf am I gonna do now?! Lol
    I have an F250 with the 7.3l diesel and probably use it 80% of the time even though I could use the car....but thats usually when I need the truck
     
  13. Slow Reflexes

    Slow Reflexes Poster Extraordinaire

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    Cheap fuel helps to make practical things that may not be practical without cheap fuel, sure. But there's still a difference between "big" and "BIG." I wasn't thinking of F350s when I was talking about my "monster" vehicles, but if that's the limit of the subject then I guess that changes the conversation a bit.

    IF you really tow a trailer full of horses over a mountain range with a 97hp compact truck, then you're certainly welcome to your interpretation of practicality - but I have to assume nobody really does that. If they need to make two trips instead of one, or maybe 10 trips instead of 20, there's a serious argument for the "practicality" of a larger vehicle.

    This, of course, has no bearing on the "personal transportation" argument. But it does give some reason for the existence of the vehicles.
     
  14. av8theskies

    av8theskies Tele-Meister

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    I use a 7.3l diesel because they dont make a 7.5l or a 10.5 lmao
     
  15. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Commercial vehicles here are huge. People who haul horses use trucks (what we call trucks, not pickups).

    You do not require a 7.3L V8 to haul your daughter's ponies though - which is more the point I'm trying to make. :D

    My neighbour two houses down owns a V10 truck. A RAM SRT I think. A red one. He doesn't use it to tow anything ;). He drives it because it makes him feel like a badass.
     
  16. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    But you are not 16. :rolleyes:
     
  17. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Off on a slight tangent here, there are a lot of guys building these Diesels up for insane performance, so it's entirely possible that a lot of guys who used to own hot rods and muscle cars have made the switch to the big rigs. That accounts for their popularity in America as well-we love power and going fast. It's part of our freaky culture.

    In this video, the truck is drag racing against a supercharged Viper.

     
  18. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I owned a '66 Mustang when I was sixteen, so I know ALL about owning a vehicle that costs more than a teenager typically has to spend!
     
  19. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    We love power and going fast too. We don't do "big" heavy and lumbering though.

    Here's an Aussie "truck".

     
  20. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    There always has been two schools of thought when it comes to performance: Americans have traditionally gone for large-displacement motors with enough torque to slam your genitals into the back seat, where Europeans have gone for smaller displacement, higher-revving motors with much more advanced handling characteristics.

    I have owned a few muscle cars in my younger days, but I have to admit that my mindset changed completely when I bought my BMW. It's an entirely different driving experience, and one that I prefer to the old-school "go faster than hell in a straight line" approach.
     
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