My Musikraft Neck is on the way...now what?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by illinismitty, Feb 14, 2020.

  1. illinismitty

    illinismitty TDPRI Member

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    74
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2020
    Location:
    Nashville
    I am working on my first partcaster build. The body is in the final coats of lacquer before I wait 4 weeks for it to cure for final finish. The neck I ordered from Musikraft has their standard light seal coat of lacquer. Rosewood board untreated. So here are my questions

    1. What do you treat the rosewood fingerboard with?
    2. I am looking for a satin type feel on the neck. So do I just continue to add more lacquer and just finish with scotch pad? If so, how many coats do you usually do on a neck that has a seal coat? Or sand off their lacquer and start over with the same brand?
    3. Is there something other than lacquer that would cure faster so I do not have to wait 30 days before finishing? For example Tru Oil?

    Thanks!
     
    TelenTubes and Boreas like this.
  2. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    10,344
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    Location:
    northwest
    1. What do you treat the rosewood fingerboard with? Mine seems fine with nothing. But I did one raw linseed oil wipe on wipe off on the rosewood. Just got my MusiKraft a few months ago.
    2. I am looking for a satin type feel on the neck. So do I just continue to add more lacquer and just finish with scotch pad? If so, how many coats do you usually do on a neck that has a seal coat? Or sand off their lacquer and start over with the same brand? I'm currently just using the sealer coat, I kinda like it, not shiny, maybe "rough satin". If anything I would fine sand with 0000 wool and wipe on Tru Oil... but not until it seems to wear as is.
    3. Is there something other than lacquer that would cure faster so I do not have to wait 30 days before finishing? For example Tru Oil? Tru Oil is good, Formby's Tung Oil poly is good, dries in a day and you can wipe on or brush. I just brush and it levels out nicely, somewhat glossy though. it's acually a poly.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. illinismitty

    illinismitty TDPRI Member

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    74
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2020
    Location:
    Nashville

    Thanks for the advice. How is the fret finishing on the Musikfraft necks? Any additional work needed on frets once they arrive?
     
  4. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    75
    Posts:
    3,305
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Washington
    Some time back in Martin's little care and feeding instructions that came with new guitars (and on their website) they specifically recommended NOT putting any lemon oil or similar products on fretboards - they said that it could damage lacquer finish. I no longer see that recommendation, but since I use lacquer almost exclusively I have followed that advice. Others will tell you that rosewood needs "feeding" or oils will keep it from drying out (humidifying your music room will do a better job). Also remember that getting any oil product on your neck and then trying to add coats of lacquer won't work.

    As far at the finish on the neck, if you know it has nitro cellulose lacquer (hopefully a vinyl seal coat or two) then I would continue to apply lacquer until you are satisfied with the build and finish. New coats will burn into the previous ones. I typically end up with 10 or 12 coats before I do the final buff. You may want less, and if you want a semi gloss then you can scuff with a scotch bright pad or micro mesh.
     
    koolaide likes this.
  5. koolaide

    koolaide Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    794
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2009
    Location:
    south carolina
    Super glue. same for neck back.
     
  6. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    10,344
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    Location:
    northwest
    Seems pretty playable, I did a little dressing the fret end corners, but I always do that. I wish I had asked for the heavy fretboard edge rolling though, the regular rolling is not as radiused as I would like. (not worse than other makers though) At least MK offers the option of a heavy roll, I chickened out at the last minute!
     
  7. dan40

    dan40 Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,663
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2015
    Location:
    Richmond Va
    I have really been liking that Formby's Tung oil finish on my necks lately. I just wipe on a couple of very thin coats a day for 2 or 3 days and then let it thoroughly dry for a couple more. I even wipe one or two coats on my rosewood fretboards. It darkens the rosewood a tiny bit which I also prefer. I have been doing my necks this way for a couple of years now and have never had any issues. If you want a satin feel, just stop at 2 or 3 coats. If you apply more it will start to build a low gloss film which is also very slick feeling.
     
    El Tele Lobo likes this.
  8. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,224
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2014
    Location:
    Maine
    I have purchased two Tele necks from Musikraft; the frets were nicely dressed, ready to play, on both. I use plain mineral oil on rosewood. I finished both necks with 7-10 coats of rattle-can lacquer, polished to a gloss finish.

    Make sure to post a couple pictures.
     
    El Tele Lobo likes this.
  9. illinismitty

    illinismitty TDPRI Member

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    74
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2020
    Location:
    Nashville

    I wasn't thinking when I ordered and I have the truss rod adjustment on the heel. I didn't want to pay the restocking fee so I left it. But I hate having to take the neck off to adjust the truss rod. Oh well, if it's a good neck, it won't need it that often.
     
    El Tele Lobo likes this.
  10. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,609
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    dont have to take the neck off, stewmac sells truss rod wrench just for this.. BUT BUT BUT, your body should be vintage style with the routing for the heel truss rod like this..

    [​IMG]

    if it doesnt, then you'll need to take the neck off.
     
  11. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    75
    Posts:
    3,305
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Washington
    I do a lot of setups and it pisses me off to have to take a neck off to adjust the t/r. I end up estimating it and that compromises the setup. Yes, there are spoke wheels and that elegant Gotoh side adjuster but the Fender way is just plane dumb.

    Btw, on your Musikraft neck, I would just assume that you will need to do fretwork, I've never seen a neck that didn't. In an interview in American Lutherie Ken Warmoth said that they expect the end users to need to tweak the frets but he also said he knows most don't.
     
  12. illinismitty

    illinismitty TDPRI Member

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    74
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2020
    Location:
    Nashville

    I have a humbucker in the neck, no pickguard - so yeah the neck will have to come off. I am still kicking myself for overlooking that. The neck comes tomorrow. I hope that the frets are at least level. Then all I will need to do is create some fall off, perhaps finish the edges. I guess for the price I paid, I expect to do some work. Hopefully it's minimal.

    Since you have done a lot of set ups with these necks. I like a small amount of relief. Will the string tension create some relief once it's on and tuned up? I am wondering if I should string it up straight, or put a hair of relief on it before string it up. Like you said, it's a little guesswork. I am new with this style truss rod
     
  13. illinismitty

    illinismitty TDPRI Member

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    74
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2020
    Location:
    Nashville

    It's doesn't. I can't create one since I am not doing a pickguard. Big amateur mistake on my part. The only thing vintage-style on this project is a Broadcaster voiced single coil at the bridge. Pretty much everything else will be modern (sorry to let the purists down...LOL)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2020
  14. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    75
    Posts:
    3,305
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Washington
    My usual procedure is to adjust the neck dead flat with no string tension and level the frets to that, then put it on and string it up just to see how much relief the tension of whatever strings I'm using will pull into it. If I'm somewhere between, say two and four thousands I'll go ahead with the setup. I'll also look at what is going on at the body joint and decide if I need to do any thing there. If I'm out of those spec's I'll take it off, make an educated guess, maybe introduce a bit of back bow and try again.

    I know that changing the relief changes other setup parameters so I always get that dialed first. I also know that anything less than perfect frets compromises the setup so I'm pretty anal about my fretwork.

    Don't know if this will help

    https://www.tdpri.com/threads/basic-setup.952636/
     
  15. illinismitty

    illinismitty TDPRI Member

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    74
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2020
    Location:
    Nashville

    I have seen that thread before a while back doing some homework on fret leveling, and I have used a lot of info from it. A very insightful thread, thanks for sharing your wealth of information for us DIYs.
     
  16. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    57
    Posts:
    1,938
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    There's no need to do anything to the rosewood fretboard — yet!

    Over-oiling it can cause it to become soft and spongey, and can even make the frets lift up. Wait for it to dry out (three months to two years) before even thinking about it. Tung oil is not really an oil; like Tru-oil, it's a partially catalyzed varnish. It will coat and cover the fretboard and completely change the way it feels. Mineral oil is pretty much the only thing I'd recommend for fretboards, although F-One oil is very good, and Feed-N-Wax is OK, even though it has citrus solvents and some carnauba wax in it.

    Super-glue is actually a highly effective sealer for raw wood and a fast-drying solution for dings and depressions in a wide variety of finishes, but it's hard as hell and doesn't sand flat that easily. For God's sake DO NOT USE IT ON YOUR ROSEWOOD FRETBOARD!! No, no, no, no! That's about the worst advice I've ever seen on this forum.

    If you spray lacquer thin enough, 72 hours will be more than enough time for it to dry. As a fellow TDPRIer has said hundreds of times, lacquer does not "cure." It just dries. Much, much longer drying times are often required because it's usually not applied correctly, but if you put a nice satin Mohawk Tone Finish Clear on the back of that neck with a feather-light touch, there will be NO sanding required and you can put the guitar together in a matter of hours or days, not weeks. That's what I recommend.
     
  17. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    57
    Posts:
    1,938
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    Tru-Oil is a great finish for a guitar neck, btw. But it won't go over lacquer very well, if at all, without a layer of shellac in-between.
     
  18. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,609
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    We all like what we like, no need to apologize for what you want.. IMO the Broadcaster is an amazing bridge pickup and at times I miss my Baja because of it.. If I have a tele project thats blackguard inspired, its my first choice for bridge pickup.

    You will have to take the neck off to adjust truss rod but its only for the first few times you set it up.. once you get the neck and action alright, you wont need to adjust it again anyway..

    P.S.

    when I saw the your tele body, I instantly want to go swimming.
     
  19. Boreas

    Boreas Tele-Meister

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    114
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2019
    Location:
    Port Kent, NY
    I have used StewMac's Fretboard Finishing Oil on a couple fretboards with good results.

    Previously, I used it on old fretboards that I cleaned with naphtha with good results. Yesterday I finished a new raw fretboard with it. It is a Chinese unfinished pre-fretted neck with decent rosewood. I wasn't real happy with the color variation in the wood. The StewMAc product has a brown tint to it, so I gave it a try. I used two heavy coats, wiped off 20 minutes later, and let sit overnight. It really evened out the color variation and darkened the light spots on the rosewood noticeably. I think it turned out very well. See during and after pix below. Unfortunately, I didn't take pre- pix...

    To the OP, there is no right or wrong here. If you only have one or two guitars and play them frequently, you may never need to feed or finish your fingerboard. I have about 20 guitars with rosewood necks, so each guitar sees little play. If they look (dull) or feel dry when I pull them out of the case, I feed them with StewMac lemon oil. Otherwise, I may only use (GASP!) FastFret to bring the strings and fretboard back to life. Never had a problem with either product with my Martins, Fenders, and Gretsches with nitro finishes.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Feb 18, 2020
  20. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,609
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    turned out pretty nice!! wow!
     
    Boreas likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.