My guitar student thinks Jimi Hendrix is terrible!

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by Steve Holt, Mar 4, 2017.

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  1. Grux

    Grux Tele-Holic

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    Yes, but Hendrix was a Proud American and would've been in Vietnam if he hadn't been discharged from the 101st from back trouble. Lots of people forget that, Hendrix may not have made such an impact if he'd not been discharged from the army. Its kinda funny though, the hippies protested the war and Hendrix played the National Anthem anyways lol.
     
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  2. Lochry

    Lochry TDPRI Member Gold Supporter

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    Amen. Jimi enlisted. If there were a rock-n-roll walk of fame, Ft Campbell would have its own star. A lot of great players passed through. A lot of great bands used the Post's clubs and the border bars as incubators.
     
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  3. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Doctor of Teleocity

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    I understand your student's undoubtedly, inexperienced...if he were under my tutelage, I'd be sure to Jimi his soul!
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2017
  4. deytookerjaabs

    deytookerjaabs Friend of Leo's

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    What???

    Dude's got more personality and ideas in one line than lot's of people can come up with in a lifetime of playing. His melodies on his rock ballads were also incredible.





    I guess it's self indulgent in the sense of "he plays for too long" as if there's no merit to improvised instrumentals. Listen to his phrases and time here, he goes from ahead angular permutations to complete "workin' in the fields" OLD gospel bar to bar.. it's incredible. Never has a guy has such a sense of pushing time WHILE being 100% rootsy & old school. Same thing the best jazzmen did for jazz Hendrix did for the blues.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2017
  5. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Kid is not into stuff from his grandparent's generation? :eek:

    :p
     
  6. ifallalot

    ifallalot Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    This is a problem to me
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Gibsonsmu

    Gibsonsmu Tele-Holic

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    I don't really understand the point of this thread. This just in, not everyone likes everything that everyone else does.Who cares
     
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  8. Grux

    Grux Tele-Holic

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    Its a music thread about music, thats the point I got.
     
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  9. old guitar player

    old guitar player Tele-Afflicted

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    Hendrix was a brilliant songwriter. His guitar playing was secondary to his craft. Sadly he was never able to capture what he recorded in a live setting. That was due to the limitations of the time. Also, unfortunately Jimi was frequently stoned out of his mind during his live shows. I believe if he not been under the confines of his crooked management and died he would have gone onto greater things.

    That being said Hendrix was no way an influence on my playing.
     
  10. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Well in a way Hendrix held up and celebrated the basic tenets of the US Declaration of Independence, Constitution etc at a time when maybe a generation or two needed to be reminded that the right to peaceful protest was deemed essential by our founding fathers for the freedoms idealized in and after our Revolutionary War.

    The hippies were protesting against our participation in someone elses war.
    Self government demands our citizenry take risks even on our own soil to ensure we stay within our ideals.
    Hippies were proud Americans too, and took a lot of flack for doing what their forefathers asked of them in the Constitution.
    I don't see any more rift then compared to the OPs point about generational alienation between two individuals.
    One might hope that a huge movement won't be started by 14yo protesting Hendrix as guitar study material!
     
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  11. Gibsonsmu

    Gibsonsmu Tele-Holic

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    Thanks!
     
  12. cmclayton101

    cmclayton101 Tele-Meister

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    Its not just about liking Hendrix! I know many my age that do not fancy him! Its about the industry as a whole. There used to be countless artists/groups keeping this industry going. Even Jazz!!! Jazz is completely dead! How are you gonna get today's youngin's into that?! Lol. I dunno!!
     
  13. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Time is short, so only went through page one and a few heavy-hitters.

    All I have and know of JH are a few crusty records and a few CDS, DVDs and VHS. Yeah YouTube, sure, and I read many of the fables drawn up by the RnR and guitar/musician communities over the decades. I love Hendrix, I love the noise, the screech, the radio coming in through the amps, the 'wold is a big gimmick' thing just as I love the fantastic solo-rhythm melding, effect use, and casual cool feel, power trio formula notwithstanding. I think I get it, and if I say what I don't like about his music it only shows what preferences I have, and also shows the privilege of being able to look back and reevaluate. Does it really matter? Hat's off to those guys who were there-- I wasn't but at age 14 I already knew. I could of just as well been anti-JH if I saw him as part of an establishment or a signal of anti-proficiency, or even the dreaded "he's just a gimmick" of noise arguments. I think the fact we discuss him today reaffirms the vitality of his musical visions.
     
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  14. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Doctor of Teleocity

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    In terms of commercial radio, The Machine has taken over, true artistry has long taken a backseat! When the general public, (including musicians), are confronted with cutting edge, sometimes genius, they're overwhelmed...especially when it was during the flower power/psychedelic '60's...people like Hendrix, were easily written off as anti-establishment/freaks, (yes, there were some truths to this, in terms of square appearances), but this ironically overshadowed much of his groundbreaking brilliance.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2017
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  15. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    At the time, even without the internet :rolleyes: (how DID we get by...) it was very obvious even to me as a teen, that war protesters were the farthest thing from anti-American. I heard Jimi's performance that day (later, my parents wouldn't hear of me going) as a pure, unrehearsed expression of love for his – our – home, coupled with frustration directed towards leadership. Unless you think it was just sarcasm – and I don't – the fact that he played that song, in that moment... This was a very serious artistic performance, out on a limb, a bridge, an essay of love, war, history, society, and hope, all wrapped in an amazing package.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2017
  16. Grux

    Grux Tele-Holic

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    We talking about the same hippies? The ones who spat on those returning home? I'm not gonna get into a political discussion because I know that isn't allowed, but I see your point. I don't agree with you but I agree to disagree, and thats ok by me.
     
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  17. jman72

    jman72 Tele-Afflicted

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    When I first started playing back in the late '80s, I was really into shredder stuff and clean technique was everything to me. I couldn't stand Jimi- way too sloppy for my taste at the time. It was only as I got older (and wiser) that I realized what a genius Hendrix was. I still feel dumb sometimes when I realize what an ignorant kid I was. Sometimes you have to grow into music to really appreciate it.
     
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  18. peterpicker

    peterpicker Tele-Meister

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    I never became a good player because I'm so left brain that I thought there were strict legal rules to follow. Jimi did his own thing and although I still suck, he did release me from music legalism.

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using TDPRI mobile app
     
  19. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

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    The Jimi Hendrix Experience was sloppy (Live at Winterland is particularly bad), and much of his lead playing sounded like noodling, and not very musical. Band of Gypsies is quite another story. Tight musicianship, and it provided a more solid foundation for Hendrix to noodle over. I like listening to that particular band, as it much better kept the whole thing together.
     
  20. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I agree that we don't want to get into a political discussion, but had you been there when the vets were returning home, you might have noticed that many vets became hippies, and very very few hippies spat on vets. I knew lots of vet hippies and payed close attention to them because I assumed i would soon follow in their footsteps as a soldier.
    I never once saw a hippie spit on a vet or even voice disdain for our returning soldiers.
    The protests were against the Govt, not the vets.
    Good heavens I find it hard to believe that this myth still exists.
    Those vets were my friends, they were the unpopular truth tellers.
    Many vets marched in protest, though probably not in uniform.
    They were loved and supported by their peers, whichever peer group they chose.
     
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