My guitar student thinks Jimi Hendrix is terrible!

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by Steve Holt, Mar 4, 2017.

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  1. Stratohacker

    Stratohacker Tele-Afflicted

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    Different strokes for different folks. I'm sure Hendrix is far outside of what that young man is listening to and playing right now.

    He might never come to like his music but perhaps at some point he'll be able to appreciate his playing and role in rock history. He recorded 3 studio albums, one live album, and has been gone almost 50 years and plenty of players still find him inspirational and relevant.

    I am a fan.

     
  2. Electric Mud

    Electric Mud Tele-Holic

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    "Cowboys never play in tune anyway." Jimi
     
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  3. Endless Mike

    Endless Mike Friend of Leo's

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    Thank you.
     
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  4. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Don't worry about the kid, right now he knows EVERYTHING. I did too when I was fourteen. Though I seem to have forgotten it all over the years.
     
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  5. Route67

    Route67 Tele-Meister

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    I haven't listened to his albums in a long time and probably never will again. He left the world shortly after the Isle of Wight concert at the end of August 1970. The recording of that is a masterpiece; it starts off roughly with a Beatles cover and then some hard rock (Castles) and then he unwinds into some very lengthy and expressive pieces that have been studied meticulously by guitarists the world over. He was a guitar players' guitarist. The technical proficiency of that concert I find is stunning. He covers a lot of ground in a live context (and it was a lengthy performance made much longer by technical difficulties and interruptions.) It's important to realize the context that concert was given, and the competition he faced by the equipment smashing The Who in his lifetime. Hendrix was so far above that level of spectacle by comparison. He didn't smash his guitar, he just dropped it at the end with exhaustion. He gave it his all. I like to think of Hendrix as a musician on par with jazz greats like Charlie Byrd Parker. So much of that art depends on spontaneous inspiration, off the cuff hooks that open into unexplored vistas of expression. Hendrix also had to overcome the constant challenge of keeping the guitar meticulously in tune, much more difficult in that way from a saxophone. For me, it doesn't matter if Hendrix loses popularity among future generations. What he accomplished in his short life is worthy of historical importance.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2017
  6. ebb soul

    ebb soul Poster Extraordinaire

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    The kid wants to play within convention.
    Pass on Hendrix, teach the standard fair.
    From a technical point, the kid is right.
    Don't let him lose faith in you.
    Just say "Hendrix played in semi tones" and move along.
     
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  7. ce24

    ce24 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I know this is a weird analogy but i Think of what Hendrix Did in his time for music is what Tiger Woods has done for golf and those that follow .I do think they were both that dramatic. I saw Hendrix... I've not seen Woods n person..


    Cheers
    Ce24
     
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  8. Ira7

    Ira7 Doctor of Teleocity

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    I guess my main argument is that regardless of how he supposedly paved the way for everyone, how he inspired them...

    A thousand guitarists after him did better stuff, and we're still listening to them, not him.

    Most of his stuff is unbearable, an exercise in "Look at what I can do!"
     
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  9. dsutton24

    dsutton24 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Why wouldn't a 14 year old kid have an opinion on a musician? Everyone else on earth has different musical tastes. To me the biggest surprise is that you've got a 14 year old student, there just aren't many of those around these days. Do everything you can to challenge him and bring him along. Trying to prove him wrong on something that's just a matter of taste is far more likely to discourage him than it is to bring him around to the 'correct' point of view. For example, I'd rather listen to a train car load of accordions fall into a giant shredder than anything the Rolling Stones ever performed. I'm waaay older than 14, and I don't care what anyone else thinks of that opinion.
     
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  10. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Actually JH on Johnny Carson shortly after woodstock discussed his intent for how the song was played, as for the patriotic rah,rah, stuff I just think it was JH's interpretation of the song as felt at the time, creative licence! not much else can be said about that.
     
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  11. 1300 E Valencia

    1300 E Valencia Friend of Leo's

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    There's Charlie Christian, T-Bone Walker, B B King, Jimi Hendrix, and Eddie Van Halen.
    Everybody else has copied these guys. The copies almost always aren't better, but the rough edges get sanded off to appeal to mass audiences.
    Just like Pat Boone was "better" than Little Richard. The masses like homogeneity.
     
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  12. tele12

    tele12 Friend of Leo's

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    Regardless of what anyone thinks of Jimi's music there are not a thousand guitarists after him who did better stuff than him that people are still listening to.
     
  13. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Jimi was only 27. Some of us don't do ANYTHING by that time in our lives. I know I was still figuring it out. Sure, Jimi was, too, but he was BRILLIANT and IMHO he had such a small ego and a huge love for the music. The stuff he did in that short time, exposing himself musically to everything he could get his hands on, and transforming it all into HIS unique expression. A true artist.

    We wonder what Hendrix might have thought if he had lived, or what he'd have done next. Fact is, our guesses would all be wrong. I suspect for quite a few years, he would have continued to lead us by the nose, to surprise us. Heck, Joni Mitchell says that when she last spoke with Jimi, in London shortly before his death, he bashfully mentioned to her that he was thinking of something involving big band music. Really?! We may not all like his work, but it was original, brave, and totally unique to him.

    I strongly feel that Jimi was one of those people who simply have more capacity than most of us. An ability to have insights and make connections that most of us just don't have or see. His work, and his attitude, have enriched my life.


    As for the 14 year old kid, he's absolutely entitled to his opinion - why not?! It might not be informed by what we would consider relevant, but he's trusting his gut, ears, and taste. Or perhaps he's influenced by a recent tweet... I dunno.

    Everything I said at 14 was idiotic. But somehow those moments were key to getting me from birth to here. Same for the kid. He's on his path, leave him be.

    Steve, you could always slide in some Mayfield style rhythm work into a song the kid likes. Maybe he goes "hey, what's that?". "Your mom won't let me tell you." :lol::lol:
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2017
  14. 1955

    1955 Poster Extraordinaire

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    When anybody says something sucks, no matter what age they are, ask them if they can do better than what the person they think sucks did. If they can, maybe they're right.
     
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  15. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I love Hendrix's use of triads to play chords and leads interwoven. I wouldn't agree that he has little value when teaching theory, quite the opposite.

    On the other hand I'm not a big personal fan of music that is really all about the guitar. His lyrics and singing hold no interest for me. Maybe I'm just not of his time.
     
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  16. Brian Wright

    Brian Wright Tele-Meister

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    Hey me too! We must be related.
     
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  17. Chick-N-Picker

    Chick-N-Picker Friend of Leo's

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    We also could disagree on what's "pretty hard" and not. So in my opinion, it is pretty hard for you not to deny it, but to you it's a piece cake.:lol:Rock on. :)
     
  18. Brian Wright

    Brian Wright Tele-Meister

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    It saddens me to think of all the music that could've been if he hadn't died.
     
  19. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Ahh, you are too young to know the internal conflict that was in everyone back in the 60's. I think you got Jimi's statement very well and it just goes to show that you can feel his stuff. As to your "feel" about things "untouchable" ... Yup, all part of what Jimi was trying to say.
     
  20. strat123

    strat123 TDPRI Member

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    So many things to say... Hendrix died when I was 12 years old. I stared getting into rock music at age 13. Up until that moment most of what I listened to was either Soul music or Motown and that was great stuff. At 14 I hated Jazz, but I never thought that Duke Ellington or Louis Armstrong sucked, actually I admired them for what each had accomplished through their musical endeavors. The 1st 3 rock albums I bought were Live Cream, The Worst of Jefferson Airplane, and The Band of Gypsies. That Hendrix album would go on to have a profound effect on my views and understanding of rock music as I came to know it. To this very day, I still view what he did with the Band of Gypsies at the Fillmore East originally released on Capitol Records to be other worldly. Nothing and I mean nothing short of what Charlie Parker and the musicians who played with him did at The Jazz concert at Massey Hall in the mid 1940's and/or What Coltrane did on The album and song Giant Steps during the early to mid 1960's. I'm not a big fan of Classical Music but I understand the importance of Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Schoenberg, and Stockhausen. Yes, I do like Classical Music also though it may not be my music of choice in a given moment. My father loved Jazz and I hated it, but through my music teacher I began to appreciate the music of Charlie Parker and Miles Davis, and the great Thelonious Monk and our music teacher who was an accomplished Jazz pianist also had albums from groups like Led Zeppelin and Gentle Giant among other rock groups of the time that he turned us on to. There are saxophone players who can play as fast as Charlie Parker but few who can write, play, and interpret music as brilliantly as did he. I don't think I've ever heard anyone play more intense and fast as Coltrane but that's only a matter of time, someone will come along and surpass him but that does not diminish the wonderful contributions those two men among many, many others known and unknown made in the world of Jazz and Western Music in general for that matter. Hendrix is one of the originators of what we now call shredding and in his day he had few peers in that category. The thing about Hendrix though or at least in my opinion is that his music went a great deal beyond that. His lyrics and musical arrangements, not to mention the social/political impact of what he spoke about through his music were a great deal beyond much of what was being done or said at the time. Hey, if you don't like Hendrix fine, that's ok. All the same he was a great lyricist, guitarist, and musician even by today's standards, but like others have said the kid is only 14. By the way, Hendrix is not my favorite guitar player but consider this there are guitarists out there that are just as or perhaps more proficient that the great Segovia, but no one denies his greatness.
     
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