My college rig has finally come together!

Cheap Trills

Tele-Afflicted
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Good luck in college. Smile a lot and realize everyone there is probably just as nervous and excited as you are. Learn a few popular acoustic songs for those moments at parties when someone randomly asks you to "play something." Busting out some shred at that moment may get you 15 seconds of pats on the back, but songs they can sing adds to the party (and may get you laid).

I think those are good guitar and amp choices. Keep it simple. I only took one guitar, one amp, and don't even think I owned a pedal back then. At that time, you needed room for your massive desktop computer and monitor, stereo system, and 13inch TV which took half the room.
 

BoomTexan

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Good luck in college. Smile a lot and realize everyone there is probably just as nervous and excited as you are. Learn a few popular acoustic songs for those moments at parties when someone randomly asks you to "play something." Busting out some shred at that moment may get you 15 seconds of pats on the back, but songs they can sing adds to the party (and may get you laid).

I think those are good guitar and amp choices. Keep it simple. I only took one guitar, one amp, and don't even think I owned a pedal back then. At that time, you needed room for your massive desktop computer and monitor, stereo system, and 13inch TV which took half the room.
I personally hate pedals, but if I try to join a worship team running my LP into a DI, it's not gonna go well. If I could make this work, I'd just bring my personal handmade amp (6W6 + 6SK7 + diode rectifier, 1.5-3W), an attenuator, and a 1x15 speaker, but I wanted to be prepared for possible gigging, and the Peavey can more than handle anything you throw at it. If I find that its impractical for dorm usage, Atlanta is full of old Peavey crap, so I can pick up a Bandit or Rage for $25 no problem and sell this on Reverb.

I do need to learn more pop songs, but I just don't like them, haha. Anyways, 15 seconds on Spotify and a chord chart in front of me is more than fine for "learning" a new song at a party. Most of them are just C-G-D or some variation on that.
 

dogmeat

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yells at cloud 2.jpeg
 
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NickFisher

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Congrats) Great selection for college. At one time I took one guitar and one amplifier and I didn’t have enough of it. I had to upgrade the equipment when I started playing in a band with my classmates.
 

fenderchamp

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I'm going to Georgia Tech to study Mechanical Engineering. Super excited and also super worried, haha. Gonna be hard for sure

I wonder how I'm gonna solve the revolving door instrument problem that I have. I buy and sell stuff, so at any given point I'm getting rid of some amp/guitar/pedal for a different one. With space constraints, that's gonna be a lot harder. I also do amp tech work, so it might get even more crowded.

Goodness, a J45, your roommates must have been jealous. I sure know I would be. How did it sound? I've always been partial to Epiphone Texans, Gibson Doves, and Gibson Hummingbirds myself. Not much of a Martin or Taylor guy, its Gibson all the way for me.
Sorry to be real, and old but ...

You should be too busy with math and Engineering homework to worry about goofing off with gear too much. Keeping up with you classes and your GPA, and trying to keep your hands in shape, if are much of a guitar player, and trying to meet new friends, not to mention members of your preferred ... how do you say that these days... better keep your GAS at bay.

If you are a freshman at Georgia tech and you have Distortion boxes, Craigslist and the Gearpage on your mind all of the time, you are doing something wrong. if you find that happening, re-evaluate and make adjustments, possibly make appointments for some free advice at the University Counseling center.
 

fenderchamp

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A backend developer should have extensive knowledge of one or more programming languages mlsdev.com/blog/71-development-of-mobile-apps-for-food-delivery-services. They should have experience working with databases and server-side scripts. They should also have strong knowledge of object-oriented programming and other server-side technologies. They should be familiar with version control systems and have knowledge of the HTTP protocol. They must also be familiar with programming languages such as Python, Java, and Ruby. It's also important to have strong knowledge of OOP.
are you posting to the correct thread?
 

BoomTexan

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Sorry to be real, and old but ...

You should be too busy with math and Engineering homework to worry about goofing off with gear too much. Keeping up with you classes and your GPA, and trying to keep your hands in shape, if are much of a guitar player, and trying to meet new friends, not to mention members of your preferred ... how do you say that these days... better keep your GAS at bay.

If you are a freshman at Georgia tech and you have Distortion boxes, Craigslist and the Gearpage on your mind all of the time, you are doing something wrong. if you find that happening, re-evaluate and make adjustments, possibly make appointments for some free advice at the University Counseling center.
Haha, it's 2nd week of classes so far and I wish I'd done Music Tech instead of mechanical engineering. Met a guy at a jam session doing that and he's majoring in building mixers. They get to think about distortion boxes all day, lucky them...

Anyways, I'm fully expecting classes to get significantly harder in a little while, and I'm gearing up for the point when I won't be able to go to jam sessions twice a week and go out to pawn shops and check out their stock, but so far I've met a lot of people who can adequately balance difficult courseloads and still find time to hang out and talk shop with other musicians for at least couple hours a week.

Anyways, thanks for reminding me to get off TDPRI and get back to studying for my American government class's debate about the striking down of New York's gun control law by the Supreme Court. Can't wait to see how getting shouted down by a class of 200 liberal-er students feels like. Not gonna win, but might as well give it a shot.
 

BigDaddyLH

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A backend developer should have extensive knowledge of one or more programming languages mlsdev.com/blog/71-development-of-mobile-apps-for-food-delivery-services. They should have experience working with databases and server-side scripts. They should also have strong knowledge of object-oriented programming and other server-side technologies. They should be familiar with version control systems and have knowledge of the HTTP protocol. They must also be familiar with programming languages such as Python, Java, and Ruby. It's also important to have strong knowledge of OOP.

And soldering. Must know how to solder.
 

imwjl

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I've been preparing for this for a while now. It wasn't an easy decision and I had to leave a lot of stuff behind, but I think these are the essentials for me.

First, the hardest choice was which two guitars to bring. I eventually settled on these, an Epiphone Les Paul Standard and a Kramer Ferrington. It basically came down to me asking which guitars would be best for using on stage at a new church, and I just had to go with the Kramer for its acoustic electric ability.

For audio equipment, I chose the Two Notes Torpedo Captor X and the MAudio Duo, mainly because they were the cheapest yet most reliable equipment I could get my hands on. They'll come in handy when I need to practice silently, or when I need to record.

For pedals, I took my basic pedalboard that I've been using for a while now. Boss TU-2 into EHX Memory Boy, and then into a Behringer reverb pedal. From there, it goes into a heavily modified EHX LPB-2 (LPB-1 in pedal form). From there, the signal hits a Caline EQ that I mainly use for a boost for lead parts, and then into a Sunn Model T preamp pedal. Basically, the only overdrive is coming from double boosting my signal into a MOSFET preamp. The Sunn by itself is very Marshall-y, but when double boosted, it can get into serious metal tones.

The pedalboard is going into my most recent acquisition, a Peavey PA200. I chose this because it has built-in spring reverb and a master volume, so if I need to ditch the Behringer reverb for a fully analog sound, I can, and if I need an edge of breakup sound from the preamp, I have that too. Peavey distortion is really underrated. This is tasteful, but when boosted, super aggressive too. It sounds great clean or distorted, and is the perfect pedal platform while still having enough character for me to like it without pedals. In case I pick up bass, it'll be great for that too.

The cab was recently thrown together, and when I get to Atlanta, I'm gonna get an Eminence Texas Heat or a Delta Pro 12" speaker. I just need something that can handle the Peavey if I go on a gig or something. I chose not to get one yet because I don't think it could survive a 14 hour road trip bouncing around in my minivan.

This (and having increased my bank account from 200 to 3k) is the culmination of 1 year of constant trading, buying, and selling, and I'm really happy with how everything turned out.
Lots of stuff for a dorm room! My son put his decisions. Good luck!
 

THX1123

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Haha, it's 2nd week of classes so far and I wish I'd done Music Tech instead of mechanical engineering. Met a guy at a jam session doing that and he's majoring in building mixers. They get to think about distortion boxes all day, lucky them...

Anyways, I'm fully expecting classes to get significantly harder in a little while, and I'm gearing up for the point when I won't be able to go to jam sessions twice a week and go out to pawn shops and check out their stock, but so far I've met a lot of people who can adequately balance difficult courseloads and still find time to hang out and talk shop with other musicians for at least couple hours a week.

Anyways, thanks for reminding me to get off TDPRI and get back to studying for my American government class's debate about the striking down of New York's gun control law by the Supreme Court. Can't wait to see how getting shouted down by a class of 200 liberal-er students feels like. Not gonna win, but might as well give it a shot.

You might find a more balanced view than you expect.

People who shout rarely have an argument. It seems that the current state of things forgets this.

A very important thing you can learn at Uni is critical thinking - why do believe what you do? How do you make a solid argument to support it? What can you bring from the course material and which existing arguments are actually valid? You'll find most of the nonsense from TV talking heads and from public figures are versions of classic fallacies.

I liked to argue the opposite of my opinion. I learned way more that way.

 




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