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My classical challenge

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Freeman Keller, Jul 12, 2020.

  1. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

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    :lol::lol::lol:

    I tried, really I did on my brotherhood bass to do this but apparently I didn't buy/use the correct CA and just got through scrapping up the mess and touching up the body stain so never again unless educated better or walked through it. Until that day I'm doing the Jerry Rosa thing of Hobbyinc canopy glue from Zap, a company I trust from home repairs. Simply a glue formulated to glue plastic RC canopies to pretty much anything. I've tested it on Les Moore and it worked well.
    As for facts I'm full of 'em lmao

    Dave
     
  2. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    I won't tell you my first CA experience. Somewhere I read about just squeezing a bead of medium CA all the way around the binding channel, putting the binding in place and taping it down. Afraid that I might glue my fingers to the guitar I put on a pair of latex gloves and promptly glued them to the guitar. Ever seen binding with little bits of blue latex stuck in it?
     
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  3. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

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    :lol::lol::lol::lol:
     
  4. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    Did some clean up on the binding

    IMG_6509.JPG

    and glued a piece of Braz on for a heel cap

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  5. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

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    Sweet :)
     
  6. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    Many classical guitars have 650 mm scales which is 25.6 inches. Fender, of course is 25.5, Martin long scale is 25.4. PRS is 25.0, Martin short scale is 24.9, Gibson is 24.75 or .65 or maybe some others depending on the year and how they were making the necks. So much for standardization, eh?

    Natelson calculates the fret positions for 650 mm scale in both decimal inches and to the nearest 64th. They also show a really cool way to calculate the 12th root of 2 geometrically - it would be fun to lay that out. I doubt that the Master builders in the 1800's had scientific calculators built into their cell phones, they probably used the graphical method.

    I took the Natelson table and my fretboard out to the fab shop where I used to work and borrowed one of the machinist's 24 inch Sterrett rules and marked my board. Came home and put together a quick and dirty fret mitering box - a piece of MDF with two pieces of UHMW the width of the board. Made a cut thru the UHMW that stops the saw at its back brace with the blade 1/8 off the MDF.

    IMG_6467.JPG

    That little bent thing is a piece of fret wire with the barbs filed off, I use it to check the depth of the slot and to make sure its clean. Here is the board

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    Drew a couple lines to represent the edges of the board - the critical measurements are the width at the nut and 12th fret. Cut just outside the lines, then sanded the edges of the board flat to the line

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    Classical fretboard are traditionally dead flat but some modern builders put a very small radius in the board. I don't remember if C&N discuss this, I know they do radius their steel string board. When I built my previous classical I used a 20 inch radius, I'm going to do the same with this one. This is just a simple radius sanding block with a piece of 120 grit.

    IMG_6511.JPG

    Clamped the board onto the neck to check all the fitment. I've purposely left the neck slightly oversize - since the side of the board is flat and the correct width I'll bring the neck to it

    IMG_6512.JPG
     
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  7. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

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    Lovin' it :)
     
  8. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    Got the arbor press out, heated up the glue and stuck some frets in the board

    IMG_6519.JPG

    Here is that little slot checker. If you don't have one of these make one. It has saved my butt a couple of times

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    No pictures of the frets clamped over night. Next day I clipped the ends, then hit the belt sander to take them down to the board

    IMG_6521.JPG

    Finally hit the edge on the sanding beam. I know it is nice and straight so I can carve the neck accordingly

    IMG_6522.JPG
     
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  9. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

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    Glad to see I'm not the only one who glued frets in :). Some I think take it too far but hey. I just never wanted an air gap under the frets, especially as I tend to solid neck reinforcement in the old Martin tradition

    Dave
     
  10. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    Many people glue frets in, whether its during installation or just wicking a drop in the ends. I figure anyone working on my guitars after I'm dead and gone better know about using heat to pull frets. Most of the time I use CA but for this one it was HHG.

    Speaking of HHG, I clamped two blocks of wood to the top to locate the f/b from side to side, got all my clamps ready, heated up the pot and stuck the f/b on

    IMG_6523.JPG

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    Last edited: Aug 27, 2020
  11. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

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    What are you thinking in terms of strings? Just wondering
     
  12. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    Savarez medium tension to start with. I've got a couple of packages in my string drawer. However that may change - a friend is coming over this weekend to have me look at a couple of his guitars. He is a fine classical player and very good instructor - his personal guitar is a hand built brazilian one that his wife had commissioned. I'm going to ask his opinion of what I'm doing and if he had any suggestions this is a good time to factor them in.

    I'll be doing a traditional six hole tie block on the bridge so any string will work.
     
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  13. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

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    I guess I'm just besotted with Nygut atm. Nice crisp tone like gut but without the disadvantages
     
  14. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    There will be lots of time to experiment with string when and if this thing gets finished (and I feel it is worth it). I've got a pretty good feel for steel strings and what different compositions and diameters will do, but nylon is new to me. I keep the Savarez because from time to time I get to work on a classical and its just nice to have something on hand in case the owner don't supply me with strings.
     
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  15. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

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    I was raised around gut strung instruments oddly enough and prefer that sound but you get little service from them. Nylons last for a long time but tend to thud somewhat, like a Bass. One reason I've avoided classical guitars though I will have to say flamenco caught my eye as a young man lol

    Dave
     
  16. PhredE

    PhredE Tele-Afflicted

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    Looks great Freeman.
     
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  17. PhredE

    PhredE Tele-Afflicted

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    This is one of the reasons that carbon (composite polymer) treble strings are so popular these days. The trade-off is a slightly smaller diameter for e, b, g strings (ex.: .028->.024, .032->.028, .040->.033) and some *can* feel slightly harder or stiff under the finger tip especially as they age and get a bit tired, but, the bolder clearer tone is considered a suitable trade-off for most. The bass strings are usually just the same as in other popular sets, so no changes for those most of the time. They typically cost about $4-$5 more (than std. nylons) per set.

    Strings matter. :)

    PS. Oops, forgot.. I agree the std. Savarez set is a good starting point. Should be fine.
     
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  18. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    With the fretboard on I can do the final neck shaping. And lots of sanding

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    It interesting that altho I mostly work in Imperial units, inches and pounds and stuff like that and C&N give their measurements in inches, when it comes to the neck I automatically start thinking metric. The width at the nut is 50mm, 60 at the body joint. The neck is 21mm thick at the nut and 25 at the 10th fret. I could convert but instead I just set my caliper on metric and started sanding.
     
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  19. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    Classical guitars do not have finger board markings, either dots on the board or on the side of the neck. I can live without the ones on the board but in a moment of weakness I put 'em on the side

    IMG_6530.JPG
     
  20. Rjelecaster

    Rjelecaster Tele-Meister

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    Yes, metric is the way to go!

    Do you intend to drag this thing on into the second week of October????

    (all joke aside, very nice build!)
     
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