Mustang III for Chicken Picking ?

Discussion in 'Modeling Amps, Plugins and Apps' started by Brett Fuzz, Feb 8, 2014.

  1. Brett Fuzz

    Brett Fuzz Tele-Holic

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    I just sold off all my Wampler pedal collection to fund other stuff.

    Just curious before I eventually replace those pedals, can you get a decent compressed chicken picking, slap back country sound from the Mustang III ?

    Would be cheaper and more convenient than lugging all those expensive pedals around again.
     
  2. Guitarist4u36

    Guitarist4u36 TDPRI Member

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    I work a lot of theater showcases so I do a variety of styles, but mostly country-based material. I do a lot of the "Brent Mason" tele type stuff. While I do have a big tube amp/pedal board rig if I need it, in the theater stuff I use a mustang III. It sounds great for just about anything I throw at it. Is it a $2000 tube amp?? No....but I can't say there's $1500 worth of tone difference either. I like mine real well. The Mustang IV is great too IMO. I hope this helps.
     
  3. Brett Fuzz

    Brett Fuzz Tele-Holic

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    Thanks for the info.

    Just what I needed to hear. That's the way I'll go.:)
     
  4. Jim Dep

    Jim Dep Friend of Leo's

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    Music Matty that used to post here is a James Burton, chickin' pickin' fan.

    He uses a Mustang IV on stage and loves it. The Fender amp modeling is 2nd to none.

    Here's another guy from your neck of the woods that loves his vintage Fender tones through his Mustang III. He owns a few of the actual amps and prefers to take the Mustang out on his gigs. I wish I was still gigging so I could take my MIII out of the house.

     
  5. Brett Fuzz

    Brett Fuzz Tele-Holic

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    Thanks Jim,

    I'm going to buy one in the next week or so. I need a new amp and now I don't have any pedals, this looks like the best solution.

    Thanks guys.:)
     
  6. Tle4

    Tle4 Tele-Afflicted

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    I sold a couple of pedals to fund a used MIII V2 with the thought of just leaving it at my rehearsal space so I wouldnt have to lug my tube amps out. Now I am thinking I may use the MII V2 to gig with. It is light weight and less gear I have to bring.

    Mine came with the 4 and 2 button foot pedals which makes it very gig friendly. I lock the 4 button switch in mode 1 so I can use the tuner and select between 3 presets and use the 2 button switch to turn on 2 different effects. My 3 presets are clean, just break up and crunch and I usually have an OD pedal and delay I can turn on each preset.

    Check out your local CraigsList.... Maybe you can find one used but for what they cost. I think they are well worth the money.
     
  7. Jim Dep

    Jim Dep Friend of Leo's

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    I think your approach is the way to go for live work. There's so much versatility there even by just keeping it simple.

    I've read that some people get stressed out because of all the options available and maybe they don't know where to begin.
    I'd suggest taking the basic amp models at the end of the menu, picking one or two amps that you're most familiar with, set the EQ flat with no effects, just like if you were trying out any new amp.

    Adjust the tone to your liking, then you can add a touch of reverb, or delay, or gain, etc, and save those presets under a different name. Now you have those new presets stored on both your amp (and in a file on your computer if you choose to attach the USB cable). Your original factory settings will always be stored on your computer if you accidentally erase one. ) Just by doing that, keeping it simple, you are ready to gig. You also have the option of keeping the EQ on the amp flat, with no effects, and then adding your favorite pedals, either between the guitar and amp, or through the effects loop.

    When you get on stage, adjust the tone knobs on your amp, and/or pedals, depending on the acoustics of the room. You already know that can change depending on how many bodies fill the room. It's no different than using any other amp. In due time, add more amp models as you feel comfortable with.

    Also, if you pick up a used Mustang, try to get the original receipt so you can have what's ever left on the 5 year warranty.
     
  8. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    The compression on the M III is more than enough to cover the needs of someone in your situation.
    They also have an excellent set of delays that you can get pretty much dial whatever delay you are shooting for.
    I love this amp, and I use mine on stage as well as a Roland Cube.
    I really believe that modelling is going to be the next big move into the future.
    The Line 6 stuff I used for a while had some nice amps, and comps, but the rest of their pedal gear and mod stuff was pretty cheesy.
    Now they are starting to dial in the real deal.
    I use Patch 86, 89, 85, 9, 16, 17, but I always adjust the control EQ's. This amp, as with most of Fender's gear, is more aimed at Metal and Rock players. They set the patches to a LP, or other humbucker guitar.
    In order tho get that snap and twang, I find I have to cut back the mids a lot, and the bass some too, then boost the treble.
    If you are looking for that Bakersfield twang, put in a set of Keystones.
    Don't forget to go to the Fuse website. Players are always putting interesting patches on this site, and they are free to download to your amp.
     
  9. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm not complaining, but does anyone know why they suddenly took such a tumble in price?
    When I started looking at this amp they wanted around $500 MSRP. Now you can get one new for about 1/2 that.
    Just curious.
     
  10. Tle4

    Tle4 Tele-Afflicted

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    Maybe they are clearing out the version 1's. Most places I am looking online have the MIII v2 for $300-$329 and are sold out. I think the MIII v1 originally sold for $299 . I have not seen them going for $500.... MSRP is just the suggested sale price. Usually street price is a bit lower
     
  11. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    Cool, thanks.
     
  12. dburns

    dburns Friend of Leo's

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    I've done the same thing. I keep the Mustang III at my buddy's where we rehearse. Haven't done a gig with it but I feel totally comfortable with it as a backup to my tube amps (TRRI/Peavey Classic).

    I also have and use the 4 and 2 button foot switches similar to you. They are kinda necessary if you want to maximize the versatility. Can't imagine a much better value.
     
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