Musical training that is complimentary to guitar

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Stanford Guitar, May 16, 2020.

  1. Stanford Guitar

    Stanford Guitar Tele-Meister

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    I'm thinking to take some formal snare lessons to work on my timing. I'm thinking this will carry over to my guitar/bass playing as well.

    Thoughts? Other ideas?

     
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  2. scook

    scook Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    I took drum lessons for a while for exactly the same reason. It definitely helped my rhythm, counting, and overall understanding of time and feel.
    Immensely helpful to overall understanding of music.
     
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  3. ce24

    ce24 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I wish I had piano lessons...
     
  4. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I was a snare drummer in marching bands through primary/high school......

    I have a metronome in my head now.... marching and playing sure helps your timing...;)
     
  5. tfarny

    tfarny Friend of Leo's

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    Drums are super helpful for a musician, just to develop that part of your brain, and if you play with a drummer, to hear what he/she is doing and respond to it. Plus they are a heck of a lot of fun except when you sit there waiting for all the guitarists to tune up and talk about their pedals...

    I'm buying a keyboard tomorrow, mostly for ease of working out harmony singing but also to re-learn to read sheet music.
     
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  6. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

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    Singing lessons.
     
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  7. cyclopean

    cyclopean Friend of Leo's

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    mandolin will make you a better guitarist.
     
  8. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I took up the bongos to help my timing and it was the best idea I ever had ... to help my timing.
     
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  9. Bergy

    Bergy Tele-Holic

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    Studying other instruments can grant fresh perspective to the way you approach your primary instrument.

    I took a semester of snare drum/marimba lessons at one point. It helped me with reading rhythms and also helped a bit with overall general rhythmic sensitivity. These days I have a drum kit in my basement and that helps me a lot. It is a pretty rare day when I play with a marimba player, but it would be odd for me not to play with someone on a drum kit. It helps me fortify the groove if I can understand his drum beat.

    Studying and playing bass has helped me as a guitarist, too. Those calluses you get playing bass, mainly the right-hand pointer and middle finger can be helpful in fingerstyle acoustic. Understanding bass grooves and how to play a few yourself will enhance your sensitivity to the bassists you play with.

    At one point I had to play some banjo and I detested it....but when I picked up my guitar and started playing fingerstyle again all of my rolls were really tight. Banjo helped my fingerstyle guitar playing.

    Yea, playing some piano can be helpful. Especially when you are looking at how to build chords. I've taken more group piano lessons than I would have preferred. Part of the problem for me was that pianos and guitars are functionally so similar (harmonic, rhythm section instruments) that it felt way more redundant for me than say a drummer who never studied how to build a chord, or a horn player who wasn't used to polyphony.

    Singing has been my bane. I love it when other people sing but I hate to do it myself. So many mediocre academic musicians have busted my balls that I have become unnecessarily resistant to it...but it really does help. I think classical ear training and sight singing are usually taught in a way that is dogmatic as crap. It doesn't have to be, though.

    I think its pretty helpful to know how to play a few other instruments other than your primary. Most of the time when you play music, you will have to interact with people that are playing different instruments. Knowing a little bit about drums, bass and vocals can be really advantageous in say...a rock or blues band.

    I've been going back through the history of chordophones lately. I'm thinking about trying to build some simple versions of the earliest stringed instruments to see if they can offer any perspective.
     
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  10. gimmeatele

    gimmeatele Tele-Holic

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    Just bought myself a keyboard to learn to play and have to say I am picking it up pretty quickly thanks to playing guitar and understanding music theory, even leaning to sight read (at last)
     
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  11. johnny k

    johnny k Friend of Leo's

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    Learning the basics of musical styles you are not familiar with might help too. i.e. funk in that case.
     
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  12. El Marin

    El Marin Tele-Afflicted

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    Bagpipe, banjo... Learn what NOT to do sometimes is good for you :D
     
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  13. PoorNoodle

    PoorNoodle TDPRI Member

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    As a guitarist...good to know singing (while playing), bass and drums (to understand rhythm) and piano (since a lot of theory uses it as a starting point and to build hand strength and stretching). Oh, and the bassoon! :D
     
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  14. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Straight out lessons from a teacher who knows their chops.
     
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  15. Gardo

    Gardo Tele-Holic

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    Why not solfege ? Primarily used for voice training it is easily applied to any instrument.
    Rather than thinking C D E we learn do re mi . Makes sight reading easier, finding roots simple and transposing is automatic
     
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  16. tah1962

    tah1962 Friend of Leo's

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    I started playing drums when I was 11, and guitar at 13. Drums will definitely help with timing. However, through all my years of practicing/playing both instruments, practicing to a click track, or metronome has proven to be the most rewarding. It amazes me how many drummers refuse, or can’t play to a click track. Timing is everything and a cheap metronome is a simple and effective solution.
     
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  17. mfguitar

    mfguitar Tele-Afflicted

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    I think that the piano would be a great choice as well, all the notes are right there. Learning to play banjo and pedal steel helped me greatly with the guitar style I play today. I do love well played drums though.
     
  18. cousinpaul

    cousinpaul Friend of Leo's

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    A lot of the finger-style accompaniment I do on acoustic guitar is based on drum patterns. I've also kept a keyboard around since I was in my twenties. I'm not great but have gigged on keys and they have definitely informed my guitar playing.
     
  19. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Doctor of Teleocity

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    I think the consensus answer is.....ANY musical training, especially on a strange (new to you) instrument is an advantage. It will broaden your perspective, and force you to acquire different motor skills.
     
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