Music to which your parents exposed you, that actually turned out to be good

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by Mr Perch, Jul 20, 2021.

  1. Happy Enchilada

    Happy Enchilada Tele-Meister

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    Don't know if the Joe Pass album is available on vinyl - I have it on CD.

    Another great Christmas CD is the Tractors one - they're an eclectic bunch out of Tulsa. Very cool for yule!
     
  2. Doomguy

    Doomguy Tele-Meister

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    My mom and I never got along musically. She likes country music, Skynard, older punk and ska bands that I just never liked. My dad exposed me to bands like Alice in Chains, Sabbath, Soundgarden, System of a Down, Green Day, Metallica.

    Dad definitely set me on the path of metal because as soon as I heard AiC I was like, I want to hear music like this but slower.

    I find it funny that a lot of what he listens to now are things that I've exposed him to. Just returning the favor, I guess.
     
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  3. Happy Enchilada

    Happy Enchilada Tele-Meister

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    Wonder how much Cool Whip they used for this?
    Let's hope you don't get busted for a "scantily clad (in whipped cream) female" by the forum PC police.
    You sure couldn't shoot that album cover today!
     
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  4. Steve Holt

    Steve Holt Friend of Leo's

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    My parents were born in the mid-late 50s so they were a bit too young for the 60s stuff I like. My dad introduced me to Stairway to Heaven and Nights in White Satin. When I was a kid it sounded like strange garbage, but by the time I hit high school, I had a different idea about it. My parents tend to skew more towards bands like CCR and the Eagles whereas I'm more into Dylan and the Beatles, as well as David Bowie.
     
  5. teleforumnoob

    teleforumnoob Friend of Leo's

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    My parents listened to the AM radio country of the 60s and 70s and they took me to the Grand Ole Opry once.
    Other than that they had little musical interest. They didn't even own a record player. I got my own little radio when I was 9 or 10, and bought my own stereo at 15 or 16 so I could hear rock and roll.
    A good bit of the old classic country that I hated back then I can appreciate now, and a lot of it is still worthless schlock.
    Same as it ever was.
     
  6. oregomike

    oregomike Tele-Meister

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    Beatles- Let it Be
    Willie
    Waylon
    Hank Sr. (of course)
    Cash
    Merle
    George (No SHow) Jones
     
  7. sloppychops

    sloppychops Tele-Holic

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    What I remember most is suffering through long car rides with the station tuned to WFRE, an "easy listening" station. However, they did watch Hee Haw, and even though I cringed through most of it, I think it had a profound influence on me musically. That's where my love for the Tele started, even though I didn't know it at the time.
     
  8. G3Hanz

    G3Hanz TDPRI Member

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    Dad (born in '44): Zappa, Emerson Lake & Palmer, The Nits (Dutch band, kind of theatrical), Cream, Stones, Mama's & Papa's, Kayak (Dutch '70's synth rock), Eagles, Supertramp, Fleetwood Mac, Pink Floyd. He also liked later era music like dEUS (from Belgium), 16 Horsepower, Tindersticks, Built To Spill, Morphine and a whole array of Dutch '90's/'00's bands like Bettie Serveert, Hallo Venray and Daryll-Ann. We traded quite a few cd's around that time.

    Mom (born in '46): Moody Blues, Tangerine Dream, Mike Oldfield, Beatles, CSN(&Y), Neil Young on his own, Roxy Music, ABBA, Leonard Cohen, Joe Jackson. Later on a period with UK New Wave stuff like Talk Talk, The Smiths, Joy Division, The Cure and from that she rolled into classical stuff somehow. Brahms and Mozart and such.

    First artist i really liked was Joe Jackson, through mom. While both my parents were into music, they never encouraged us (i have an older sister) to pick up an instrument. In fact it was the opposite: don't you dare to make noise at home! Still grateful for their music input though :)
     
  9. Mr Perch

    Mr Perch Tele-Afflicted

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    You got that right.
     
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  10. dlew919

    dlew919 Doctor of Teleocity

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    Sinatra. Slim dusty. My fair lady. Simon and Garfunkel. Holts the planets. Mozart.
     
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  11. Sparky2

    Sparky2 Friend of Leo's

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    Hank Williams
    Charlie Pride
    Frank Sinatra
    Dean Martin
    Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass
    Perez Prado
    Buck Owens
    Roy Clark
    Louis Prima and Keely Smith

    I got no complaints.

    ;)
     
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  12. kafka

    kafka Tele-Afflicted

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    It was a constant parade of jazz and modern classical. It was always great, to me, then and now. These are just the names that showed up repeatedly over decades. The total list is endless.

    Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Charles Mingus, Thelonious Monk, Joe Pass, Gerry Mulligan, Ella Fitzgerald, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Sarah Vaughan, Joe Williams, Mel Torme, Art Blakey, Wes Montgomery, MJQ, Chet Baker, Benny Goodman, Louis Armstrong, Chet Atkins, Les Paul, Nat King Cole

    Béla Bartók, Igor Stravinsky, Sergei Prokofiev, Claude Debussy, Erik Satie, Maurice Ravel, Steve Reich, Phillip Glass, Terry Riley
     
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  13. JRapp

    JRapp Tele-Holic

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    We never had much music around, but my da had some Ellington, Basie, and Julie London with Barney Kessel. It was my older cousin John who played me some BB and Freddy, the Byrds, the Band, etc, and had the first electric guitar I ever saw up close; a cherry red ES345.
     
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  14. buster poser

    buster poser Friend of Leo's Platinum Supporter

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    My folks (and their parents) are music fans, and started taking me to see live music when I was ten years old.

    When I was smaller than that my dad knew that I hated the way he sang "Tom Dooley," and when I finally heard the original in my teens, I realized I preferred his version.
     
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  15. fjblair

    fjblair Tele-Holic

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    Old school country and Lawrence Welk.

    Just kidding about LW, but my mom watched that and had records by Ray Conniff and the Connoff Singers. It was awful. But my dad liked country, and most of it was good back then.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2021
  16. Big_Bend

    Big_Bend Poster Extraordinaire

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    My father was born in 1935 on a farm near a very small Texas Czech town South of Houston. He spoke Czech and didn't learn English until he started grade school

    I grew up listening to dad playing Czech polkas records and listening to the Sunday morning broadcasts of Czech polkas on the radio. He would often take the family to Czech polka dances at the old community hall. Good times!

     
  17. haggardfan1

    haggardfan1 Friend of Leo's

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    This is an interesting thread.

    I was just thinking yesterday evening in the car, while taking my younger daughter out to dinner--I listen to much of the same popular music that she and my other kids do. I already had the radio on one of her favorite stations. I wonder how many two-removed generations have that happen? I can tell you that in the seventies and eighties, neither my mom nor dad cared one iota about the poop and rock music that I enjoyed, along with what they had raised me on. Hmm...

    Back to the topic. The apple really didn't fall far from the tree between dad and me--he always had a Merle, Willie, Ray Price, Charley Pride, or some such 8-track playing in his vehicle. He was a dyed-in-the-wool country, bluegrass, and gospel fan--and I got a huge dose of that too.

    Mom was probably responsible for my diverse interest in music I don't necessarily perform. She was a virtuoso pianist who could play anything from sheet music, plus she listened to what was easy listening radio at the time or what would today be called AM Gold.
     
  18. stnmtthw

    stnmtthw Friend of Leo's

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    Creedence, Everly Brothers, Marty Robbins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Elvis, George Jones, a lot more I can't remember.
     
  19. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    My piano teacher had grown up in a Pentecostal church in which the pianists added a lot of flourishes of the kind made famous by Jerry Lee Lewis. In becoming a straitlaced Baptist, she played the notes mostly as written, adding an arpeggio only once in a while.

    In the 1950s and 1960s, at least a couple dozen gospel quartets and family gospel ensembles were celebrities in the South, and the misbehavior of the singers was an object of gossip. I remember carloads of young men and women driving sixty miles to Springfield, Missouri, to see a big-name gospel concert. Concert promoters tacked up posters on wooden utility poles to advertise the events.

    Now I realize that the gospel music performers, like the churches, were racially segregated, even though the composed music was shared. A black composer, Thomas Dorsey, wrote two of the most performed songs by white groups, Take My Hand, Precious Lord, and There Will Be Peace in the Valley. There’s no question in my mind that gospel music is rooted in blues and is a musical cousin of rock n roll.
     
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  20. arlum

    arlum Tele-Holic Platinum Supporter

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    Nat King Cole

    Benny Goodman

    Glenn Miller

    Merle Travis

    Chet Atkins

    Roger Whittaker

    Les Paul

    Jerry Reed

    Gene Krupa

    Buddy Rich

    Roy Clark
     
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