Music to which your parents exposed you, that actually turned out to be good

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by Mr Perch, Jul 20, 2021.

  1. John Owen

    John Owen Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    1,912
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2010
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    My dad was a fan of Chet Atkins, The Mills Brothers and the Ink Spots. I still like all of that stuff!
     
    Greggorios and brookdalebill like this.
  2. davidge1

    davidge1 Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,176
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2006
    Location:
    USA
    My father was a big country music fan, and had a collection of records from the 50s and early 60s - all the classic honky tonk music from that era. I heard country music continually from the day I came home from the hospital until the day I moved out, so I had the history of it in my head from the 50s through the 70s. That's kind of informed everything I've done with music. I'm lucky to have that kind of "musical education"
     
    Greggorios and brookdalebill like this.
  3. IanMoss

    IanMoss Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    532
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2021
    Location:
    Australia / NZ
    Neil Diamond
    ABBA
    Harry Chapin
    Al Jolson
     
    Greggorios likes this.
  4. Chipss36

    Chipss36 Tele-Holic

    Age:
    58
    Posts:
    627
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2020
    Location:
    Texas
    I see a lot more logic in my parents music choices, than kids now a days.

    Leaning that old country, especially the lead lines , or fake lap steel on the tele, really drives it home.
    them cats were outstanding musicians.
     
  5. jays0n

    jays0n Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    756
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    My Mother played Bowie constantly (albums in the house, 8 Tracks in the car). I am pretty attached to Bowie's music to this day due to those times.

    My Father, though, ... he was into some real hippie love n peace stuff I could never get into but he also liked Velvet Underground/Lou Reed, Stooges and some others I did take to. Lou Reed especially reminds me of him, and I find I am drawn to that music more and more lately.
     
    Aftermath and Greggorios like this.
  6. Stanford Guitar

    Stanford Guitar Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,012
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2020
    Location:
    USA
    My entire family was very musical and I came from a very big family with many cousins etc. My parents were children of the 60s, so soul, 60's, hippie music was du jour at our house. My grandfather was an immensely gifted bluegrass player. Most of my uncles/cousins played a variety of instruments. So, I started with music pretty much from birth, and with a guitar when I was 5 or 6 years old. I started studying jazz/classical music when I was about 7 at the direction of my uncle, and later with some well known teachers. The area I grew up in was a big Piedmont blues area. I had a great childhood.
     
    jays0n, Greggorios and brookdalebill like this.
  7. eclecticsynergy

    eclecticsynergy Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,600
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2014
    Location:
    Albany NY
    My Dad was into Western music and establishment pop in the 60s & 70s, also loved pioneer ballads & campfire songs. He played guitar & banjo, and showed me my first few chords; later he taught me the 12-bar blues and introduced me to voice leading. Helped me build my very first guitar amp, too.

    When I was with him I heard old time Texas swing & bluegrass and light pop like Mamas & the Papas, John Denver, Herb Alpert, and James Taylor. And lots of old-time stuff, songs from the era of Titanic and the Great War.

    Mom had more of a taste for rock and thanks to her I got generous doses of Beatles and Stones. She also listened to film & Broadway soundtrack albums, folk/protest songs and 50s/60s jazz - bossanova and Brubeck, not so much bebop or big band. I still have her LPs of Time Out, and most the early Beatles records, along with a box of 45s from The Ventures and others. Themes from Peter Gunn, and Secret Agent.

    My stepfather was extremely traditional. Dinner in our house was a jacket-and-tie affair at eight sharp, a ritual always accompanied by classical music. First the opening of the wine to breathe, then the lighting of the candles, then the arrival of the food at the sideboard, then the carving & serving, then the pouring & tasting of the wine.

    It was quite a production, eating every night by candlelight at a 400-year-old table (whose battle scars were from actual battles), with chamber music or a symphony wafting in from the big room. And we had some very interesting dinner guests over the years.

    I hated dressing for dinner though. It was the 1960s, not the 1930s, and none of my friends had to. Still, I got a pretty good grounding in orchestral music.
     
    Greggorios, elihu and brookdalebill like this.
  8. drmordo

    drmordo Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    47
    Posts:
    1,372
    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2019
    Location:
    Miami, FL
    My dad was a jazz pianist and singer (he referred to himself as "an entertainer" which was a better description) before he retired around 2010 and then COVID got him in 2020. That said, my earliest memories of music - the music he made sure I heard - are the Beatles Revolver and Rubber Soul. He loved Jackson Browne and Guy Clarke, so Running on Empty and The Pretender as well as Old No 1 are also very early memories. Like I talked about in another thread, Don William's Country Boy was another one we hit hard when I was a kid. He was briefly a member of the Four Freshmen, so some of their albums like Five Trombones, Five Trumpets, and the one he was on, Mount Freshmore, figure strongly in my memory. Years later when I started to play music, he steered me toward Bird and Diz, Monk, and Bill Evans.

    My dad also introduced me to the "Great American Songbook" by watching him at gigs throughout my childhood, and those songs are still firmly lodged in my mind. My dad had a crazy savant memory for lyrics and an ear that could decipher changes in the moment, so he could literally play any one of several thousand songs on request. Sadly, I didn't get that from him - my ear is pretty good, but I can't remember lyrics to save my life.

    My mother has always had (and still has) very questionable music taste. She either likes very trite and bad country music or she connects with a female singer's life story and loves her regardless of the music. The one album she impressed on me that has stuck with me as an absolute masterpiece is Willie's Red Headed Stranger, which is an album I still love unreservedly. A personal tragedy about 10 years ago coincided with me listening to that album a whole lot, and as a result I really struggle to listen to it since then. Even now I'm getting choked up just typing about it. "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain" is much more than I can take.
     
  9. drewg

    drewg Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    441
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2020
    Location:
    Cascadia
    I found these three records in my mom's crate. That Bob Dylan guy's pretty good. Kris Kristofferson, too.
    Screen Shot 2021-07-21 at 12.42.33 AM.png Screen Shot 2021-07-21 at 12.43.07 AM.png
    Screen Shot 2021-07-21 at 12.43.57 AM.png

    From my dad: Bob Denver, Glenn Campbell, Elton John, Cat Stevens, oh yeah, and Neil Young.
     
    Greggorios likes this.
  10. Teletubbie

    Teletubbie Tele-Meister Gold Supporter

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    126
    Joined:
    May 2, 2003
    Location:
    North London, UK
    Greggorios likes this.
  11. Mr Perch

    Mr Perch Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,797
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2011
    Location:
    los angeles
    Joe Pass is the only true guitar hero. However, I couldn't understand anything in the rest of your post.
     
  12. Mr Perch

    Mr Perch Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,797
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2011
    Location:
    los angeles
    Your dad had great taste.
     
    Greggorios and brookdalebill like this.
  13. Mr Perch

    Mr Perch Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,797
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2011
    Location:
    los angeles
    They were cool indeed, although "early Sabbath" seems oddly out of place in that mix.
     
    natec likes this.
  14. 421JAM

    421JAM Tele-Holic

    Age:
    49
    Posts:
    660
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2020
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    My dad liked Roy Orbison and we used to listen to the Big Chill soundtrack in the car when I was a kid. That’s how I got into Motown.

    My mom was into British Invasion bands.

    We also had the Hooked on Classics record, and my parents friends would come visit and give me records. Bee Gees, Beach Boys, and that type of thing.

    Nothing very surprising for a kid in the early ‘80s. Boomers always seem to want younger people to live the same life they lived.
     
    Aftermath, jays0n and Greggorios like this.
  15. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,939
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2015
    Location:
    europe
    Jazz, classical, Tom Jones, Engelbert Humperdinck.
     
  16. Chester P Squier

    Chester P Squier Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    73
    Posts:
    1,099
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2021
    Location:
    Covington, LA
    I grew up in a parsonage in north Louisiana. The main music of my parents was hymns. I'm four years older than Harry, quoted above. Except I didn't quit going.

    I grew up with the 1956 Baptist Hymnal that Harry referred to. It replaced the 1940 Broadman Hymnal, which had shaped notes. The '56 Hymnal was the one my piano teacher used to teach me how to play hymns on the piano. She taught me to play the bass line in octaves in my left hand and just play the soprano and alto parts with my right, but after I taught myself to play guitar I figured out how to put in the third harmony (tenor) part in my right hand.

    One of my brothers once told me that the '56 Baptist Hymnal was aimed at fans of Hank Williams Sr. It's actually more eclectic than that.

    We also watched southern gospel music quartets on TV. Did you know that two such quartets, the Blackwood Brothers and the Statesmen, were Elvis Presley's two favorite recording artists?
     
    Harry Styron, elihu and Greggorios like this.
  17. Addnine

    Addnine Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    762
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2019
    Location:
    New England
    The best stuff my parents played were all those standards from the 30's to 40's. Back then I thought they were corny muzak. Now they're my favorites to improvise with.

    The worst was hours and hours of Sing Along With Mitch [Miller]. The absolute nadir was when they actually did sing along.
     
    Chester P Squier likes this.
  18. Addnine

    Addnine Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    762
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2019
    Location:
    New England
    My parents did the Montovani thing as well. I hated it.
     
  19. Greggorios

    Greggorios Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    4,491
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Location:
    NY
    Big bands like Glen Miller and Benny Goodman, Nat King Cole, Louis Armstrong and Broadway Showtunes- "OOOO-klah-home-ahh...". My folks were "casual" music listeners but encouraged my interest in music including taking up a "band instrument", clarinet, and singing in Church choirs.

    On an August Saturday morning in 1969 when I announced I was gonna hitchhike to hear "some bands" in upstate NY (Woodstock) Dad politely informed me the only place I was going was to mow the lawn. After the appropriate debating, cajoling and whining he offered me my only alternative which was that he'd take me to see a band of my chosing in NYC. My choice was the Grateful Dead, opening for Country Joe & the Fish, at the Filmore East 5 weeks later. Neither of us were ever the same.
     
    elihu likes this.
  20. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    11,471
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2007
    Location:
    Manassas Park, VA
    My parents had Big Band records ( Tommy Dorsey, Glenn Miller, and a 1936-1945 Ten Album Collection), plus Perry Como, Mills Brothers and Mitch Miller.
    I have memories ( in the mid 1960's) of playing my dad's records (the Big Band stuff) on our Grundig ( tube!) Console, more often than he did- once I was old enough to work the Hi-Fi, put on a record.

    I was listening to blues, basically, long before I learned what I was listening to!
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.