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Music theory 'workbook' for guitar?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by trxx, Jul 24, 2020.

  1. trxx

    trxx Tele-Afflicted

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    I think I mentioned looking at that book in this thread already. It looks like a run through of fundamental music theory concepts. I'm looking for something more like a workbook that bridges theory to making music and playing (more of a theory and composition book that has musical theory exercises). I already have an understanding of fundamental music theory. Where I am at now is, I have been playing for years, have played and gigged in some local classic rock cover bands as well as some heavier non-cover bands when I was younger, am a blues based player (mostly garden variety chords and pentatonic licks and jamming), can pick out tunes and lines by ear outside of more harmonically complex jazz based stuff, have studied fundamental music theory along the way (the same as what looks to be covered in that book), have written some songs and jam pieces along the way. But I have put very little music theory to practical use over the years. Of what I have learned, the most useful has been knowing the spellings of keys and Major and minor chord scales (often helpful for picking out chord progressions in songs and writing songs), relative Major/minor scales, and pentatonics. My ear often leads me away from basic Major and minor chords for chords that are a little more colorful but my progressions most often have little underlying melodic movement, I stray very little from pentatonics in lead playing only minimally playing diatonically, almost never utilize arpeggios.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2020
  2. rsclosson

    rsclosson Tele-Afflicted

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    50 years ago this book changed my playing entirely:

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/0786696907/?tag=tdpri-20

    To do it properly, you should thoroughly work your way through it from beginning to end and not use the last pages as a reference as one (lousy) teacher told me years ago. You must also use the chord positions exactly as the book shows; not your own version of them. There is almost no dialogue and a teacher familiar with this book (like me) can help. However, many have understood what it is teaching just by playing through!

    It is dry as stale bread to work through and requires a lot discipline and persistence to not give up out of boredom, but you will know your fretboard better than ever; even after just going through the major minor and dominant seventh positions. Everything after that is icing on the cake.
     
  3. trxx

    trxx Tele-Afflicted

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    Looks interesting. Thanks! It seems to be in the same vein of a video series at Truefire that I started in on recently called Fretboard Breakthrough by Howard Morgan, which is one of the only genuinely musically useful courses I have seen over there so far. It starts out talking about the reasons behind the fretboard layout, how simple chord shapes fall across string sets (for example, how an open E, A, and D shapes are really the same, only having a small shift due to the 4th tuning between the G and B strings), on to the most enlightening chord construction approach I have ever seen (demystifying and bringing together all those seemingly crazy jazz chord voicing shapes) directly on the fretboard (not on paper), showing how seemingly complex chord voicings are really made up of triads, and later getting into bringing forth melodic movement and lines from chord changes and improvising through and from chord changes and chromatic walking bass lines. It's literally the best piece of music tutelage that I have ever seen, which is in stark contrast to most of the other courses on Truefire that I have previewed. RIP Howard Morgan. I would have definitely ponied up for some lessons from that guy. Great teaching, despite the one-way communication. Maybe you can point out any sorts of differences that might be in that book? I think I need to get the hell off the internet and get back to it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2020
  4. CupofJoe

    CupofJoe TDPRI Member

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    Linear Expressions by Pat Martino opened my eyes in many ways beyond playing, he is great to listen to and an inspiration ...
     
  5. Rocky058

    Rocky058 Tele-Afflicted

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    Someone early on linked to this Ted Greene book.

    I got my copy years ago: I'm on page 4.

    [​IMG]

    Seriously, there is enough in here to keep 'most'

    guitarist busy for the rest of their days.
     
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  6. trxx

    trxx Tele-Afflicted

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    Yea, tons of time to spend in blindly memorizing pages and pages of chord shapes, trying to figure out the right order in which to read the book and the rest of it's broken organization, and trying to make heads or tales of why anyone thinks that this is a great book (it's a big mess, really).
     
  7. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Ted himself would refer to it as 'chord catastrophe' occasionally.
    As I've espoused multiple times, the good stuff in CC is in the chapters proceeding the chord lexicon. This is where he actually inserts a lot of the shapes in to actual music.
    It's def worth looking into.
    Tim Lerch has several good vids on how to utilize the book.
    I have a bunch of TG 'quickie' videos on my yt channel as well.
     
  8. Ignatius

    Ignatius Tele-Afflicted

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    Yeah, that whole 'seeking knowledge' thing is WAYYY overrated...
     
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  9. Morpeli

    Morpeli TDPRI Member

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  10. trxx

    trxx Tele-Afflicted

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    The first book has been brought up a couple of times in this thread. It looks to be an introduction to music theory for guitarists, without any application.

    The second book looks to be pretty much the same. A clue to that is at the end of the book, being one page on 'Using scales and modes'.

    There are tons of these sorts of theory books that essentially provide scale patterns and sometimes sequences, without getting into any real application or even any musically inspired ways for practicing them.
     
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