Music is not all made from the same 12 notes.

loopfinding

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Maybe not but this is.

Yes of course, Greek. But even if we are going further into Arabic music (which we down here all steal from), it’s usually not really 24TET because the modes follow some diatonicity with some liberties on “sour” note choice here or there. In OP example it strikes me more like “blue note.”

OTOH, east of the Himalayas, you get some real alien (to us) stuff. 5-7 notes to an octave. Likely none of us on this side has any conception of these true pitches:

 
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ndcaster

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1:20



pretty interesting music

european music emancipated itself from the drone, which was a Copernican move

we can all learn from each other
 

buster poser

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It’s still solidly western/euro. It’s just weird harmony. But this stuff absolutely rips. It is like the best euro folk music along with flamenco, I love it.
I guess that’s true, I think of all those those quarter tone trills and stuff they do but it does resolve strangely. Lots of seconds and fourths
 

oldunc

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The western tempered scale has not by any means been universally adopted- a lot of music from around the world may be based on a twelve note octave, but not the twelve we're used to. For instance bagpipes use an untempered scale, which is why they can be so jarring to our ears- an untempered major third is a particularly evil sounding interval. Harry Partch based his 43 note scale on the scales of Gamelan music, which can be pretty impenetrable. There are two basic tunings systems that use unequal intervals, then the instruments are tuned slightly off from each other to produce beats, similar to the Vox Humana on an organ. It can be difficult to get your ears wrapped around; it can also be very rewarding.
 

bottlenecker

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Yes of course, Greek. But even if we are going further into Arabic music (which we down here all steal from), it’s usually not really 24TET because the modes follow some diatonicity with some liberties on “sour” note choice here or there. In OP example it’s more like “blue note.”

I thought 24TET was just something westerners use to approximate arabic music.
Turkish Makam uses 9 comma points per whole tone, so 54 divisions of an octave.
Roza Eskenazi's music has lots of turkish influence and bits of makam.
 




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