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music education for the young today - ugh!

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by ndcaster, May 26, 2017.

  1. ce24

    ce24 Poster Extraordinaire

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    We speak 'merican' down here.... English is considered a second language....lol...I seen it!
     
  2. ce24

    ce24 Poster Extraordinaire

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    We hosted a French exchange student and she picked Idaho since it was close to Canada. She reasoned that since French was spoken in Canada there was reasonable expectation that she would have some french speaking classmates...... Unfortunately the only French they knew came before fries. I personally find it abhorrent our resistance to learning second and third languages here in the US. it's not universal but it is pervasive enough to be shameful.
     
  3. dented

    dented Doctor of Teleocity

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    I have a friend that does exactly that. He contracts out to school districts in SoCal. He goes around to the elementary and middle schools and presents music appreciation in the auditoriums. He brings a couple dozen instruments with an assistant and demonstrates them all by playing fun and popular songs that kids can relate to. He brings all the small stuff too like bells, claves, occarrina, washboard, tambourine, marracas and more. He then brings kids up on stage to play the smaller instruments and join in. Just a small way to bring music to them and create an income for himself. He was a school music teacher way back when before it went away.

    http://www.ocregister.com/2014/05/0...ementary-school-students-a-musical-education/
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2017
  4. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Doctor of Teleocity

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    Hip hop & lotsa rap, don't gimme none of that other crap
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2017
  5. vintagelove

    vintagelove Tele-Meister

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    As someone in the field, the problem is the "principle" wants kids singing cute songs at the spring concert, they don't care a bit about music education.


    Which is why we need to care about it 3x more. Also, kids pick up theory and reading so well it's just stupid not to help kids reach their full potential.
     
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  6. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Jelly Roll is for yall!

     
  7. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    My daughter told me her band was going to a jazz festival in Moscow! ... Moscow, Idaho...
     
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  8. Frank'n'censed

    Frank'n'censed Doctor of Teleocity

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    Real Jelly Roll...



    “Jelly Roll” Morton who at the age of 28 made Vancouver his home during August 1919 thru to January 1921.
     
  9. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    Yeah. I performed there. About 43 years ago.
     
  10. ce24

    ce24 Poster Extraordinaire

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    That's a prestigious festival... Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival... My son went a few times... Is really cool.
     
  11. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    I didn't mention, but the UofI at Moscow is my Alma Mater.
     
  12. thesamhill

    thesamhill Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    De facto ipso ixnay de jure entonces huh-uh de academia
     
  13. Frontman

    Frontman Tele-Holic

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    I joined the band in junior high school, and there I learned to read music. I continued playing throughout my high school years, but having no talent (I played brass instruments), I stopped playing upon graduation.

    In those days I lived in California, which spent generously on it's schools. Our high school music room had a complete selection of instruments, and though our band had some 200 members, if a new member joined, there would be something for him or her to play.

    Times indeed have changed. We spend more than ever on education, and America spends more per child than any other country in the world. But though we spend more and more, we get less and less in return.

    Education is like other government-run programs in that the bulk of the money ends up in the bureaucracy and pockets of contractors, leaving little left for the teachers and students. The education system is much like the infrastructure system, nowadays it cost more and takes longer to paint a bridge than it used to cost to build one.

    I now live in Japan, which spends a fraction what America spends on education. But in Japan the dropout rate is extremely low, and in many schools, is zero. Teachers teach, and students study. People here realize that if you want to succeed, you need an education. The cost of living is high in Japan, and if you want to have any kind of life for yourself and your potential family, you need a white-collar job.

    Japanese schools have good music programs, but most parents send their kids to piano or violin classes. Almost any Japanese you will ever meet can play at least a few songs on the piano, and can read sheet music.
     
  14. jaybones

    jaybones Friend of Leo's

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    IMO teachers (at least in high school) are more concerned about getting their students to pass standardized testing that the state requires. Instead of teaching the students critical thinking and knowledge, they teach them to pass the test.

    Luckily when I graduated high school (1990) the state test wasn't in play (yet). It may have been more than a blip on the horizon, but when I graduated it was because I had accumulated the required levels of instruction. There was only a diploma, or not.

    Now (as I understand it) you can get levels of high school graduation. Full diploma, partial diploma, vocational education (they had that when I went) or an attendance certificate.

    My household must have been a rarity then. I started playing piano at age 6 (on an antique oak upright that my dad bought from a church and stripped and refinished, had several layers of paint over nice old growth grain, ebony and ivory keys).

    Mom had played when she was a kid, and I was recovering from third degree burns on the palms of each hand (campfire accident and an older brother at 3 years old). The plastic surgeon said piano would make me stretch my scar tissue, and I wish I had stayed with it.

    I could read music, but was never going to be great. I couldn't play intricate lines on both hands at once. The bass clef I could read and play on my left by itself, and the right by itself. But putting them together, the right was still OK, but left suffered.

    I played from age 6 until 10, did recorder for 4th grade (everyone did, then decided if school band was something they wanted to do), 5th to 8th I played alto sax and then switched to percussion for 2 years of high school.

    In some areas, yes.

    Major metropolitan areas have newspapers and advertising in Spanish.

    Also small ethnic pockets of various immigrant communities.

    I'm glad I used to be fluent in Spanish, as that's the fastest growing one. But so many other tongues are making their way here (mostly from Asia, Middle East or Africa) that I'm going to be one of those snobbish Americans that only wants to speak English here.

    So the USA is becoming a multilingual country.
     
  15. Henry

    Henry Tele-Holic

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    I wholeheartedly agree with these sentiments. The arts in general have been sacrificed on the alter of pragmatism. You'll find few advocates for education in maths and science more determined than me but this should be balanced (complimented) by education in music, civics, the plastic arts and social sciences.
    Things are pretty dire over here too.
     
  16. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Yes, she went with her school and had a great time there, too.
     
  17. Matt G

    Matt G Tele-Afflicted

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    For those who apply themselves, it's OK. A kid can get a grounding in the basics, but beyond that the instruction focuses on the mechanics of playing one's respective part in the school band.

    There's more theory on TDPRI than in school.

    So, you'll find kids in band who are great musicians, but there aren't any great musicians being made in band.
     
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  18. joy-z

    joy-z TDPRI Member

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    My district here in NJ offers has an orchestra/stringed instrument program (violin, viola, cello, double bass) starting in 3rd grade and a band program (woodwinds, brass, percussion) starting in 4th. My son had been taking violin since 3rd grade. We have to rent our own instrument, but the school provides the lessons.
     
  19. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    When my kids were growing up, I found that sports outside of school were generally superior to school sports. The level of play, coaching, officiating and sportsmanship for club sports seemed better for swimming, soccer and basketball. Music education seems to follow this pattern.

    When I went to the school talent shows, it seemed to me that a lot of the best musical performers were not the products of the excellent school music programs, but were kids who found a way to learn, usually with supportive families and sometimes limited resources. They put bands together and wrote music, which is not what kids learn to do in school music programs.

    I realize that public schools are necessarily inclusive, so that classes include many pupils who aren't motivated. And public schools provide opportunities for pupils whose families are unable or unwilling to provide private lessons, instruments, places to perform, etc.
     
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  20. Matt G

    Matt G Tele-Afflicted

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    It's one of the conundrums of public education.
     
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