Music and the brain... magic.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by 4pickupguy, Sep 15, 2019.

  1. 4pickupguy

    4pickupguy Poster Extraordinaire

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    There is a whole ‘music and the brain’ discussion I’m hoping to spark here.

    I watched this and cried like a baby. If this doesn’t move you, nothing will.



    This looks like a good calling... volunteers providing healing musical performances to perfectly hip people trapped in their own bodies... it’s frickin’ magic.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  2. ronzhd

    ronzhd Tele-Meister

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    This should be available in all hospice's as well as retirement homes.
     
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  3. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    When I first started teaching special ed, the district began what they called "Music Therapy" for our students. I expected some well studied, formal program to help special needs students. It turned out that it was simply playing to (or even in some cases, at) the students. There was a little student participation, depending on the "teacher" that came in once every two weeks. Again, as I soon learned, these "teachers" had VERY LITTLE specialized training.....they weren't even certified teachers. So, after a couple years, and some budget cuts, the program was discontinued. I then started my own "music therapy" sessions....not endorsed or supported by the district, but no one objected, either. I started taking a $50 Rogue acoustic to class, and then later I got a Yamaha 3/4 sized guitar (cool guitar, BTW) and would simply play things for the students. They would sometimes play along on tambourines, triangles, woodblocks, etc. I would also let them hold and strum a guitar, although none ever approached learning or even quite understanding the concept. We would even open YouTube videos on our big screen, and they enjoyed watching those some.
    I can't say I ever witnessed any tangible difference or improvement with the students, although it certainly didn't hurt anything. And I REALLY hate to say this, but in MANY special ed classes, we (teachers) are just glorified babysitters. I tried to do as best as I could for the kids, but in reality, for many of them, it was almost pointless. I hate to sound negative, but I have to be honest.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  4. Musekatcher

    Musekatcher Tele-Afflicted

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    Its going to sound negative, but its not - there is a lot of exploitation under the guise of music and music therapy. And a lot of exploitation of elderly and disabled. I don't doubt the two are exploited together.
     
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  5. 4pickupguy

    4pickupguy Poster Extraordinaire

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    I understand totally. The brain establishes ‘pathways’ and in the case of older people music has the power to reopen existing pathways using the brains neuro plasticity. We musicians (and drummers:p) are unbelievably blessed!



    Not to focus on the dementia shattering effects of music alone. I mean, we all get how magic it is. We live for and crave music (our dopamine fix) because it feeds our very souls. I suffer from Synesthesia (recently confirmed) and if I go any time without playing, my ability to not be ‘distracted’ by effects become hindered. Listening helps but playing music is the pooh for me and music is magically unique for everyone’s brain activity.
    There is simply nothing like music for the brain. Even sex is a very distant second for brain activity and dopamine production.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
  6. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    I have to disagree with you because I think you're applying standard measures of cognition to a special population. Some people can learn to play an instrument like a virtuoso, but some people can only learn that objects exist that make music. Is the knowledge that objects exist that make music worth having? I think it is. If a person's capacity for understanding is limited, it doesn't mean basic concepts are not worth having--even if that knowledge is fleeting. I don't understand how things can become so compressed and dense when a black hole is formed, but I'm glad I have a rudimentary understanding of it. Black holes fascinate the hell out of me, but I'm entirely special when it comes to understanding them. Don't babysit kids, show them the world. Just my two cents.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
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  7. Shuster

    Shuster Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Thanks for sharing that, just watching this old Guys face light up when he heard the music, was best thing I've seen in a while!!
    Music is Moonlight,, in the Gloomy Night of Life,,,
     
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  8. Bristlehound

    Bristlehound Friend of Leo's

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    Yup - music and language do something special.
     
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  9. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    I sincerely appreciate and welcome your "two cents". I'm not sure what you were disagreeing with, but I wasn't trying to make any blanket statement regarding the powerful effects of music. I was simply relating my observations and experiences with a very particular and limited group. In my class, I did the "music therapy" in spite of not recognizing any "immediate" results.....for all I knew there might be a two or three year delay, and, besides, the kids and I had fun doing it. The "babysitting" comment was not intended to infer that was MY attitude, but it reflected the actual approach of my school district. They would deny that accusation until they were blue in the face.....but it was a fact. 80% of policy and curriculum were designed to put a positive face on things for the public, and to satisfy state educational requirements, which in turn were aimed at satisfying Federal mandates. Programs can be designed with sincerely good intentions, to exploit vulnerable groups, simple laziness, or components of all three.
    You don't know me, so I won't take any personal offense at questioning what I did in my classroom, but I assure you....I felt a personal mandate to hold my students' best interests in EVERYTHING I did in our interactions. It just got very frustrating sometimes at the obstacles thrown up in our faces. Like they often say.....you wouldn't believe the stories I could tell you. ;)
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
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  10. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

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    .
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2019
  11. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    I didn't realize you'd "been there" too.....other teachers can understand the issues much better than "civilians". ;)
    I'm retired now, so I appreciate the "best wishes", but let's send them forward to those still in the trenches. The only "burn out" I experienced was due to administration. The students were a special joy right up to my last day. I did receive a serious rotator cuff injury by a 350+ lb. special ed student, but he REALLY didn't know what he was doing, and I can't blame him for what he did.
    I saw many instances of what it sounds like you experienced, with SPED students "mainstreamed" into regular classes. There are valid reasons for that, including the socialization factor, but I feel education often suffers for it. You didn't say if you're still in the classroom, but if so, YOU deserve the best wishes and "attaboys!"
     
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  12. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    You have to be careful playing oldies for people. Sometimes a song will trigger an unpleasant memory.
     
  13. 4pickupguy

    4pickupguy Poster Extraordinaire

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    What led me to the topic on music and the brain was my wife and I sitting on the couch Saturday morning researching the strange habits, eccentricities, addictions, mental issues and scandals of the lives of the great classical composers. Franz Liszt had more groupies than David Lee Roth and partied harder than Motley Crüe. Some were prolific murderers.
    There was a series a while back on the subject called Scandalous Overtures

    One article made the connection of music as a coping mechanism for the great composers, another focussed on the freakish musical gifts a very young Mozart possessed, which led us look up music's effect on the brain. Down the rabbit hole we went. Fun stuff.
     
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