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Multi scale thoughts

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by gangreen, Sep 23, 2014.

  1. gangreen

    gangreen Tele-Afflicted

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    Are they common on traditional parallel fret guitars? I've seen it used on Steinbergers. Other common brands? I see another build (hydra head) coming out of this.
     
  2. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Afflicted

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    Gretsch is the only production one I know of off hand.
    ProfessorBB_56512_Gretsch zero fret.jpg
     
  3. Ripthorn

    Ripthorn Friend of Leo's

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    I like zero frets, but they also have their pros and cons. It's all about tradeoffs. One of the beauties of building your own guitars is that you can decide which tradeoffs to make and where as opposed to some designer from decades long past or on the other side of the world. Let's be honest, it's not like building these is THAT much cheaper than buying a new one, all things considered. However, that doesn't stop me from doing it :)
     
  4. gangreen

    gangreen Tele-Afflicted

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    If I decide to go that route anything to be aware of in terms of planning and construction?
     
  5. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Afflicted

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    This is what I have found for my playing style. I want the zero fret or the nut if I am using a nut to be the same height as the other frets (fret wire) So for the zero fret I use the exact same technique for installation on this zero fret as all the others. After all, it is just like using a capo. I guess there are some players that like to have their nut set higher than the fretwire (I don't know why you would want this). Gibson has an adjustable zero fret. You can google it and see what they say.
    Z-FAN.jpg
     
  6. abarson

    abarson TDPRI Member

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    I don't know who built that guitar in the first photo, but the hardware is definitely Rick Toone headless. Rick has also done multi-scale builds.

    http://www.ricktoone.com/
     
  7. Ripthorn

    Ripthorn Friend of Leo's

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    One thing to keep in mind with a zero fret is you need your neck slightly longer so that there is enough wood behind the fret that it won't split out when pressing or hammering it in. I made this mistake on one guitar, but was able to use thin CA to glue it back in place. I like about 3/16" meat behind it. Also, you will still need a shelf for the nut, but it will only act as string guide, so file the nut slots really deep. One final issue with zero frets is getting enough downward force over them. This becomes especially hard when there is too much wood between the zero fret and nut. It's a delicate balance of having enough to not split out, but not so much as to make the break angle shallow and thus have insufficient downward force over it. I had that problem, too, and it caused buzzing on one open string. I used a string tree to increase the downward force over the zero fret and it solved the issue.
     
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