Multi-Languages

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by uriah1, Aug 23, 2018.

  1. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    I feel like such a slacker knowing only one language ! The recent threads brought this up.

    I learned latin and french in high school, but, only enough to read it.

    I heard tell that in some countries you are requried to speak a minimum of 2 languages to get into
    college?

    I thought growing up that algebra and fortran were languages and that should be good enough. I was
    wrong. Later I got a Klingon language book. (LOL)..

    I hope to pick up some more some day, and perhaps travel to that area of the world and see how I do.

    lol

    I better start soon eh...lol
     
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  2. tery

    tery Poster Extraordinaire

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    Music and laughter are a universal language …
     
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  3. RoyalBaby

    RoyalBaby Tele-Afflicted

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    I feel like that. I feel bad that my kids haven't taken an interest in languages either.

    I have been going to France for at least a few days for the last few years. Trying to learn some French at home didn't really click but some of it comes together when I'm there but then goes again. Agghh.

    Immersion and practice. Trading Mrs Baby in for a French model maybe.
     
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  4. still_fiddlin

    still_fiddlin Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    I had Latin and Spanish in HS, and spent every dime I had saved/earned up until the age of 16 to go to Spain before my senior year and study Spanish for about a month and a half. What that accomplished was I tested out of my Spanish requirement at the university, so effectively never spoke it again. Now I'm surrounded by folks speaking Spanish, and 50 years later have been working on my Duolingo app on the phone to try and pull some of it back. The missus and myself are taking a couple weeks vacation in España next month so that's part of the impetus. I've been told that Franco no longer is in power, so it will be interesting to see the changes.

    Our son speaks about 8+ languages, including Mandarin and Cantonese. He picked up enough Hebrew in a few weeks to do a marketing roadshow in Tel Aviv last month. His ear is amazing. (He tested out of Spanish at the university, too, except he never *took* Spanish in high school.)
     
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  5. Rick330man

    Rick330man Tele-Afflicted

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    Years ago, I hopped a train from Madrid to Paris. When we got to the border they swapped out a Spanish crew for a French crew. Those of us who were non-EU had to file some customs paperwork at the border.

    I got to speaking quite a bit with two of the French crew who were helping out with the paperwork. One guy spoke Spanish and German. The other spoke English and German. They explained that by the time they graduate high school in France, they were required to have studied seven years of one foreign language and five years of a second. They also explained that most of Europe had some similar requirement and were pretty amazed that Americans didn't have something on par.

    They commented that they had dealt with many Canadians and how almost all of them spoke some French, but understood that Canada was officially bilingual while the U.S. was not.

    There have been threads on TDPRI in Spanish and Portuguese. I'm sure I've seen other languages on occasion. To me, being able to speak to a few more people just opens more doors.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2018
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  6. ce24

    ce24 Poster Extraordinaire

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    The younger the better. When my kids were 1-5 years old we lived in a small Eskimo village and they learned Yupik from their friends in tandem with English at home and have been language smart all their lives. They both were foreign exchange students for a year in high school and they both became fluent by Christmas in their respective countries...Danish for one and Dutch/ French for the other.... Me I speak s bit of Spanish.... The good ol USA is a linguistic backwater "I seen it". Lol
     
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  7. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Here in Anglo-Canuckistan (check yer maps!) French immersion schooling is common. My kids were in it K-12, in public school. My wife's family is also from a French-speaking country, but not Quebec. My younger daughter has the travel bug, and speaking other languages fits in with that. She did an exchange to go to Belgium last summer, and now she is doing her 12th grade in Chile, and learning Spanish.

    We were in Japan last Christmas -- New Year's, and it would have been nice to know more that a dozen words in Japanese!

    The world is getting smaller. This is a good thing, so don't construct barriers -- learn another language.
     
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  8. RoyalBaby

    RoyalBaby Tele-Afflicted

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    I know there are some Dutch folk on here and their schooling is bilingual, when I've been to the Netherlands I think everyone under about 50 spoke perfect English. You're in a foreign country and the teenager serving you in a shop speaks perfect English, the car park attendent speaks perfect English.

    In parts of Wales there is bilingual schooling although the only point of the Welsh language seems to be that you can be rude about the English in front of them ( kidding!). My cousin learned and became fluent in Welsh as an adult and won prizes for this as it's so difficult to learn from scratch as an adult. Makes me ashamed at how p*** poor my attempts at French are.
     
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  9. Rick330man

    Rick330man Tele-Afflicted

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    Most foreigners don't seem to realize that what they call Spanish is actually castellano - the dialect of Aragon and Castile. Imposing it on the entire country 500 plus years ago was part of the effort to then unify Spain into its modern form.

    As was the case back then, many of the other provinces have their own local language. In Catalonia they speak Catalan. In Galicia they speak Gallego, which sounds a heck of a lot like Portuguese. In Valencia they speak Valenciano. There are more. In his 1939 effort at unification, Franco outlawed their use. He mandated that castellano be the official language of the country and outlawed use of the local languages. When he died, the King and then the prime minister maintained the policy of maintaining castellano as the official language of the nation, but allowed the "autonomous regions" to also speak their local languages.

    In some of the autonomous regions, you have to be careful. They view "español" as a nationality - being a citizen of Spain - not as a language. The language foreigners call "español" they call "castellano". In most of the country, referring to the language is "español" is fine. They get it. However, if you ask some Spaniards in the autonomous regions if they speak "español" some will take offense because they think you are denigrating or subjugating their local language and/or culture.

    There's the Cliff Notes version of 500 years of Spanish history in 3 paragraphs! now go learn some castellano (Spanish).
     
  10. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Is this accurate?

    [​IMG]
     
  11. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

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    I did the Duolingo course; it was OK because it was easy to use and inspired me to do better. But it didn't suit my style of learning very well, really. I am now doing studyspanish.com (the free version, so far) and find it much better suited for me.
     
  12. slauson slim

    slauson slim Friend of Leo's

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    i went to the local DMV last year. Near the front door is an employee who assesses what a customer came in for. The day I was there that employee was a young Mexican-American man who was able to help customers in English, Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese and a little Cantonese. Very impressive.
     
  13. Rick330man

    Rick330man Tele-Afflicted

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    I've seen that graphic. It is needlessly confusing.

    The language spoken is the same. There are some regional differences - like the way some Americans say "soda" while others say "pop" or some say "dinner" while others say "supper". And yes, there are different accents - like a U.S. southerner compared to a New Yorker. But to categorize them as two different languages or even dialects borders on absurd.

    True story: four of us with different accents - one Puerto Rican, one Cuban, one Argentinian and one Spanish - got together last night. No communication problems at all.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2018
  14. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    The "pop" analogy is what I was looking for! I was just wondering what countries referred to Spanish (one language) as Espanol vs Castellano. My daughter was travelling to Chile so I was practicing "Castellano:,
     
  15. dented

    dented Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    Funny you should say something. I'm in a Spanish class at University of California Irvine. I have loads of Spanish speaking patients and I am learning to communicate with them faster. It's pretty good I might add! I took 3 years of French in high school and I can remember how to ask where the library is........doh!
     
  16. Nickadermis

    Nickadermis Friend of Leo's

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    I had 4years of French in high school so they sent me to Central and South America and Mexico. Had I known..........
     
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  17. Harry Styron

    Harry Styron Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I have a niece from Arkansas who married a Max from Honduras, who had a German nanny when he was small. Max is a native Spanish and German speaker and speaks English and French well. Their son is four and bilingual. On the patio of a restaurant, I heard Max and his son have a conversation in Spanish. The son walked across the patio to his mother and said in English, “Dad says that it’s your turn to take me to the restroom.”
     
  18. Crobbins

    Crobbins Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Spreak engrish prease.
     
  19. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

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    Person who speaks three languages: trilingual

    Person who speaks two languages: bilingual

    Person who speaks one language:
    American


    :cool:
     
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  20. unixfish

    unixfish Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    ...and I was getting ready to type the same thing.
     
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