Minimum Bar Band Loudness

Discussion in 'Band Wagon' started by Nick Blue, Jan 20, 2016.

  1. String Tree

    String Tree Doctor of Teleocity

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    Make sure the VOCALS are as Clear as they are Loud.
    All of the other instruments need to support those Vocals.
     
  2. Big John Studd

    Big John Studd Friend of Leo's

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    You're too loud.

    I played in a blues/rock band for awhile and consistently measured over 110 dB in small bars where we played. I tried to get everybody to manage their volume, but it was futile. I had to wear earplugs to get through the gigs. It sucked.
     
  3. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Why do you conclude this? In one band I almost never wear earplugs. But we are very quiet - need to leave room for acoustic mandolin (mic'd), drummer uses a very small kit and power rods.

    In the other we play similar rooms but play "rock". We keep the volume reasonable and for those even 5 feet out front of the singers, dancing their tails off, there is no need for earplugs. But for me standing front and center, right in front of cymbals? Better believe I need earplugs, especially the left one that's like 2 feet away from a cymbal.
     
  4. haggardfan1

    haggardfan1 Friend of Leo's

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    This.

    But why is the jukebox, during breaks, almost always louder than the live band?
     
  5. Telepathist

    Telepathist Tele-Afflicted

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    Too many people are looking for reasons to be offended these days.


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  6. Telesavalis

    Telesavalis Friend of Leo's

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    logical answer to OP

    80-85 Db at mid room is plenty loud. Many bar bands hit 95-105 DB which is too loud.
    have someone stand mid room with a sound level meter at your next gig and measure your loudness for you. Your bass player is probably right.
     
  7. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I'm not an audio expert. But I think I've read that unamplified violins and cellos are like 85-95db. If so 80-85 seems pretty low. But again I'm not an audio expert and maybe I'm not fully-appreciating the significance of "mid room".
     
  8. Big John Studd

    Big John Studd Friend of Leo's

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    Just based on the post/comments...people complaining band is too loud, wearing earplugs, etc. That and many blues/rock bands are WAY too loud.

    The reason I suggested making an SPL measurement is because then you can be certain. Just search google for "SPL OSHA" and so forth for recommended volume levels to make a decision about the risk of hearing loss.
     
  9. String Tree

    String Tree Doctor of Teleocity

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    At this point, it can become a Can of Worms.
    "A"-Weighted Average vs "C"-Weighted Average ...

    If a Customer complains about the Volume, you should turn it down.
     
  10. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    + This...
     
  11. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity

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    This is the answer right here.
     
  12. Teleguy61

    Teleguy61 Friend of Leo's

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    If a band plays well, and is making music, you can play as loud as you want, and people will love it.
    If you don't play well, and it's not music, you will be asked to turn down.
     
  13. Big John Studd

    Big John Studd Friend of Leo's

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    Don't fret too much about the weightings for bar band rock music. Just set it to A.
     
  14. Mayas caster

    Mayas caster Tele-Holic

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    It depends on the situation. 5 to 7 where people want to be able to talk while listening to a blues band or after 10 o'clock where people go out for the night. If the drum is not micked, it can't be that terribly loud. Then again, we have a smoooooooooot drummer...
     
  15. Tle4

    Tle4 Tele-Afflicted

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    The problem with most bars I have played in is the room itself. People on one side of the bar say you are too loud and on the other side they cant hear you. We mic everything up even in small rooms so we can send the sound to the other side of the room without having to blast out the people in front. Amp stands also are a big help in cutting down stage volume so you dont blast out he people right in front

    I just set my amp volume to the drums and all is good. I have measured my drummers SPL before and he comes in around 100db

    3 of us in the band just switched to in esr monitors and now with my Fender Musang III modeling amp, I could turn the stage volume of my amp all the way off if I wanted to and still hear the same mix that I like in my ears. I now just set my amp volume as a monitor so my drummer can hear me.

    My question is..... Is it always the bass player that complains that the stage volume is too loud?
     
  16. MatchlessMan

    MatchlessMan Tele-Holic

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    My rule of thumb: If a customer can't order at the bar without shouting in the bartender's ear, the band is too loud.
     
  17. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Yes. Ironically, they are very often the ones driving up the overall volume by drowning everything out. Not so much singing bassists (correlation?). But in my experience non-singing bass players often complain were too loud, while forcing that level with theirs.
     
  18. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    I'm not a great musician by any means but I'm pretty good. My biggest complaint about weekend warriors is they can't control volume. Bands are all to loud and too consistently loud, no dynamics. Music lives in the dynamics.

    After years of playing lots of different gigs weekly or more I;m down to mostly play in a bar band a couple times a month. I wear ear plugs, partly because I'm 56 and I only have one set of ears and I want them to last. But also because TOO LOUD
     
  19. bblumentritt

    bblumentritt Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

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    My brother, who plays bass in a blues rock band, believes that good music shouldn't have to assault your ears, and they play conversational level music, where the audience members can talk to each other without raising their voices.

    If your drummer can't get a good sound without banging the hell out of his kit then he's not a very good drummer. Watch Hugh Laurie's Let Them Talk videos. They're playing blues in a small club. The audience is not getting their ears assaulted. The drummer has rags draped over his drum heads.

    Watch Levon Helm's On Drums and Drumming videos, and then watch The Band play Life is a Carnival live on SNL or on Levon's video. It's listening level NOLA rock.







     
  20. beyer160

    beyer160 Friend of Leo's

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    Bar bands should be loud enough to keep people from talking too much- if they're talking, they ain't drinking, and that's the entire point of a bar.

    Bar bands should NOT be loud enough to drive people out. Keep it between these two points and you'll be fine.
     
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