Milk Paint Project

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by joshbot, Feb 16, 2015.

  1. joshbot

    joshbot TDPRI Member

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    First time poster here.
    I've lurked around the site for a while but havent had reason to post til now.

    I've started a milk paint (well, GF Milkpaint) project and thought I'd chronicle it for anyone else interested in using milk paint.
    The look is what i call a dull glow... like pastel or a haze. The paint sheen is flat.

    I started with a USACG Strat routed normally. I raised the grain and knocked back 2 x.

    After purchasing Baby Blue GF milk paint. GF High Performance Satin, some foam brushes and some sanding pads, I began painting.

    linked are images after 1, 2 and 3 coats, respectively.
    http://www.ninjabacon.com/img/image1.JPG

    http://www.ninjabacon.com/img/image2.JPG

    http://www.ninjabacon.com/img/image4.JPG

    Due to the light, Image 2 is closest to actual color.

    Im getting brush stroke marks, but very light buffing with 400 then more vigourous buffing with 800 smooths things out nicely.

    The paint is very easy to work with and I would recommend it if you like the look. As others have discovered, milk paint is really easy to relic. Just get a solid coat of one color for the under coat, then light wax and paint another coat on top. After the paint dries, you can sand back and reveal the under coat to great effect.

    Ill update the thread as i go.
    Feel free to ask any questions you like.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Cool idea. I love milk paint, it's so unlike conventional finishes.
     
  3. brewsterallen

    brewsterallen Tele-Meister

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    Yup, like that Milk Paint.
     

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  4. Phil Gerke

    Phil Gerke TDPRI Member

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    I dig it! Thanks for sharing, I've definitely considered milk paint, so I'll keep an eye on this thread for sure.
     
  5. joshbot

    joshbot TDPRI Member

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    I like that whitewash look @brewsterallen. Tele will be my next project, and Ill probably do something translucent.

    So, I've been flattening the brushstrokes via a gentle scuff with 400 (just until you see a bit of powder form) then rigorous with 800. The paint responds well and lays down to a very gentle uniform reflection.
    I did find that unless you have 4 coats, you might show some grain if you aren't gentle enough on the 400 scuff. However, and the rare occasion that I did break through, touching up and blending is a no-brainer... simply touch up the break through area and match your brush strokes to be as uniform as possible with the pre-existing stroke (aka with the grain). Try to taper the strokes to minimize difference between existing paint and the new touch up coat. GF Milk Paint blends well and seems to dry at an even pace allowing for a decent stroke match window, if thats important to you.

    I know many of you are pretty pro at finishing, but its my first time, so I'm assuming the audience level is the same in hopes of helping any else embarking on a similar project.

    I should have full coverage and be onto top coat soon, so I'll post a few more pics later.

    thanks
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2015
  6. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    Gosh, I have sanded many guitars, many times (sometimes/often the same one many times) and I still haven't seen any visible source of power form before my own eyes! Am I doing it wrong? ;)



    PS
    I really like how it looked after one coat!
     
  7. joshbot

    joshbot TDPRI Member

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    lol misspell.

    Thanks Barbrainy =)
     
  8. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Very nice, I have considered doing this my self. I think there's a high potential for some really cool looking BSB with milk paint. General Finishes is a great product all around, I dig the waterbased stuff the most. Being able to blend the milk paint, with the transparent stains seems like it could yeild some amazing results.

    Have you thought about spraying it?...with a pre-val maybe?

    Looking good so far.
     
  9. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I would approach it using materials and methods that i've already checked out on rather than trying a whole new set of materials. You can easily get translucent colors or whitewash by using less pigment if you're mixing from scratch, or by diluting white pigmented finish with clear of the same type. For instance, white pigmented base coat from Target Coatings and clear sealer from the same product family (in this case, all water based).

    As for the relic sandwich, I wouldn't use wax between coats because it may create adhesion problems in the areas where you want the second coat to stick. Instead I use a clear barrier coat so when you sand/scuff/scrape/insult the top layer off, you're secretly cutting into the clear layer with less chance of burning through both colors down to clear wood (unless you want to, of course).
     
  10. joshbot

    joshbot TDPRI Member

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    Thanks Dr. =)
    I have thought about spraying with Pre-Val, but i would only feel comfortable if i had a location in which to spray. I'd at least want a garage, which i don't have. Hand application is working pretty well so far, but I may opt to do top coat with pre-val if i track down a space to borrow... which really shouldnt be that hard.
     
  11. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Believe it or not a large cardboard box out doors will work as a kind of makeshift spray booth. The GF stuff Milk Paint is water based so no worries about fumes.

    I think Viz is right about the wax, I hadn't caught that the first time I read it. I'd put Zinsser Sealcoat or another dewaxed shellac inbetween the layers of milk paint as well as between the milk paint and what ever top coat you plan on using.

    I've actually tried this type of layering with other finish mediums, milk paint yeilds the easiest and better looking relic types than even nitro IMHO.

    The layering of various colors gives the finisher so many options. It's sweet that you can buy just the primary colors and use say colortone or transtint to augment those for the various shades, if inclined to do so.
     
  12. joshbot

    joshbot TDPRI Member

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    Good suggestion with the box. thanks.

    I know that other mp users suggested wax to prevent bleed when layering for relic, but you are probably right about using a different material.

    I'm just doing one color (baby/sonic blue), but perhaps a future project will take me to Relictown.
     
  13. Rano Bass

    Rano Bass Tele-Holic

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    Water based finishes and a preval generally dont mix...... I tried it but its really hard to do. Maybe somebody else can but i failed miserably :oops:
     
  14. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Rano, what was your experience/results?
     
  15. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I would expect that any heavy-bodied material, particularly with a lot of pigment in it, would be hard to spray in a Preval. However HVLP turbine kits have become quite approachable in terms of cost.
     
  16. Rano Bass

    Rano Bass Tele-Holic

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    Lots of fish eye problems....... water based products have to be applied very misty.
     
  17. RomanS

    RomanS Poster Extraordinaire

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    Looks great! I have worked with milk paint on furniture, haben't used it for guitars yet. Use a foam brush to get less brush strokes/easier sanding!
    I also like (homemade) chalk paint, esp. for previously finished surfaces.
     
  18. joshbot

    joshbot TDPRI Member

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    First coat on back, then 2 of final coat.
    I recommend 5-10 percent water dilution and using high quality foam brushes.
    I m sanding smooth between 3rd and after 4th coat with Ultra fine 3 pad and 1500 scotch bright type pad.
    Only occasionally would i break through and see any wood, but touch ups were really easy.

    Onto the clear coat! (GF high performance)

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  19. k.l.k

    k.l.k Tele-Holic

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    very cool.

    i've also only ever used milk paint on furniture. maybe this will motivate me to try it on a guitar.
     
  20. Brian J.

    Brian J. Tele-Afflicted

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    is "milk paint" like white wash?
     
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