Microphonic S.D. Antiquity

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by Fretting out, Jul 12, 2019.

  1. Fretting out

    Fretting out Tele-Meister

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    I have a Seymour Duncan antiquity 2 bridge pickup in my paisley tele. I’ve noticed that it is fairly microphonic.
    Does anyone else use one of these and experience this?
    Is yours microphonic?
    Is this a common problem?
    Could it be the electronics causing this issue also?
    Do you guys know if they were wax potted?
    Did fender wax pot in the grey bobbin era?
    I think it sounds great and twangy I just don’t know if this is an (accurate) reproduction?
     
  2. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I believe the Antiquity line is unpotted to be more vintage correct.
    Gray bobbin Fender pickups were probably lacquer "potted" (dipped really) but as they age they get more microphonic.
    I have a lot of those originals and all are unusably microphonic, so I pot them myself.

    That said, try slipping a piece of copier paper under the front edges of the bridge plate to make sure it's firmly against the body, as over tightening the bridge screws can raise the plate and make a banjo out of it.
    Rubber mounting spacers rather than springs can also help reduce microphonics, but if the pup is squealy you'll have to pot it.
     
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  3. Mincer

    Mincer Tele-Meister

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    Antiquities are not wax potted, and are supposed to be slightly microphonic. This is the way old pickups were made, and it helps with the touch-sensitivity.

    EDIT: they *are* wax potted (unlike most other antiquities), but the ones I tried are slightly microphonic which lead me to believe they weren't. My guess is that they don't use as much wax as current pickups on these. Sometimes, however, the SD pages have some incorrect info. Not sure if that is the case here.

    From the Antiquity II Page:
    We use custom aged, gray bottom flatwork, brass plated steel bottom plate, vintage push-back cloth wire, and each pickup is lacquered and wax potted like the originals.We use custom aged, gray bottom flatwork, brass plated steel bottom plate, vintage push-back cloth wire, and each pickup is lacquered and wax potted like the originals.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2019
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  4. Obelisk

    Obelisk Tele-Afflicted

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    They are most likely unpotted or barely dipped, so these pickups will be more susceptible to microphony. Personally I use a bunch feedback, so I avoid unpotted pickups. You can always turn the treble control up if your guitar is too dull. Here is what the SD website says about your pickup:

    "Like the originals, the ferrous bottom plates are not wax potted, which gives you just that little extra edge and snarl, while the rest of the pickup is lacquered and potted in lamp black paraffin wax just like they were in the 50s."

    https://www.seymourduncan.com/antiquities
     
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  5. Fretting out

    Fretting out Tele-Meister

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    Thank you everyone,
    I like the tones I get out of it alot,
    if it’s normal I have no problem with it.
    I just wasn’t sure if I had a defective pickup. As it does sound good and isn’t so microphonic that it’s unusable.

    When you say they get worse with age,
    is this from temperature changes causing the lacquer to soften then harden and eventually flake away?
     
  6. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

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    You paid extra for it :)

    I like the airiness and presence of my old microphonic pickups. They sound the best just at the edge of squealing.
     
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  7. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Tele bridge pickups seem to take a mechanical beating and the top flatwork of the bobbin warps, leaving gaps and a looser area at the top of the coil. This takes decades though, and many of them get a short in the coil by that time.
    Most of mine that are that old I've had rewound, and some that are original coil are not warped, but look like they were replaced early and lived in a drawer for decades rather than bashed with picks and slogged in beer.
    Old lacquer generally looks pretty good, but hard to say if some get painted/ dipped/ or otherwise modded at some point when the squeal comes back.

    When I pot I use a higher than correct temp to reduce the amount of wax that remains, which keeps a bit of microphony.
    Unless a pickup is a little too bright, in which case plenty of wax has a bit of a dulling effect.
     
  8. bdkphoto

    bdkphoto Tele-Meister

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    I have an Antiquity II - they are based on the early 60's pickups and it is potted - I had in in my Tele for 3 years and it was never microphonic (looking at it right now)-- From the Duncan site:

    Summary

    Our tribute to the 1960s gray bottom Telecaster lead pickup. Bright and twangy with a slight softening of the treble response.

    Description
    The Antiquity II Tele bridge is built with specially calibrated, hand ground Alnico 5 rod magnets with the period correct pole stagger. There is plenty of snap and bounce of the low strings, and on the high strings this pickup gives you that classic Tele twang, but without the dreaded ice pick harshness.

    Hand built in our Custom Shop, the Antiquity II Tele Rhythm recreates the look and sound from the 60s. We use custom aged, gray bottom flatwork, brass plated steel bottom plate, vintage push-back cloth wire, and each pickup is lacquered and wax potted like the originals.
     
  9. Fretting out

    Fretting out Tele-Meister

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    I figured it had a little something done to it because you can see a lacquer drip on top of the bobbin I just wasn’t sure if it was potting or apart of their “aging” process.

    Either way I enjoy it.
    I wouldn’t want to play it through a twin on “10” though ;)
     
  10. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    Could also be any baseplate you have under the pickup vibrating. You can take the plate off, warm it up, smear on some candle wax, and reseat the pickup while the plate and wax are still slightly warm and pliable. I think some have used a little wood glue there instead.

    I haven't noticed any loss of 'airiness' when even vacuum wax potting a pickup but they sure can handle distortion after that though.

    .
     
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