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Micro Mesh finishing Pro's - I need Advice Please

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by dlmc, Dec 26, 2013.

  1. dlmc

    dlmc NEW MEMBER!

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    Sorry Guys , Another wet sanding question ! I have been a member a while and haven't had to post questions that often , But I need to clarify this Micro mesh question . I have read and searched this forum endless on sanding and finishing . Most everybody says To level sand w/ 600 wet to level orange peel and then go through the grits 600 to 2000 wet and buff and polish . I'm not to that point yet . So i need to do my research and make a plan before I get there that way I can order what I need . I 'm thinking the Micro mesh is the way to go . There are some of you that use use Micro Mesh and some say the Micro Mesh Grits over lap the sand paper ( going backward in grit ) . From what I have been reading I haven't gotten a clear answer , do you wet sand with 600 to 1200 wet paper then switch to Micro mesh ? If they over lap in grit , is there a wet paper grit to stop at , then switch to the micro mesh ? Or do you start to level sand with the Micro mesh and just go through the grits , then use a drill foam pad with 3M Perfect-it 39002 compound ,Finesse-it II machine polish and 3m Imperial hand glaze to mirror finish . Any Help would be appreciated . Thank you
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2013
  2. BartS

    BartS Friend of Leo's

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    I wouldn't know about micromesh. The way I figure it people hace been getting incredible finishes with sand paper for probably over 100 years. Actually I just looked it up seems the chinese invented it in the 13th century. So for aproching a Millennium sand paper has had a tried and true reputation. Why make the switch now???
     
  3. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have the micro mesh and all the various grits of paper too. I would say the kit is worth the money. As far as finishing. Check out this thread:
    http://www.tdpri.com/forum/finely-f...nafu-need-those-nitro-lacquer-experience.html
    I used the micro mesh on these fixes. I was able to a ding out and get the finish around it back to a gloss very quickly.

    I recently saw/worked on a finish my uncle put on one of his grand kids instruments. Inbetween coats he sanded with 400. It looked amazing just a clear coat on walnut, no grain filler or sanding sealer. I did have to do some drop filling for him before he does his final coats but I was shocked at the quality of finish. I always thought sanding between coats w/400 in an attempt to level might cause adhesion issues, but this was a solid finish.
     
  4. piece of ash

    piece of ash Friend of Leo's

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    Just use the regular paper... Mesh style paper is there to avoid clogging, which is not really an issue when wet sanding. I'm sure the makers of mesh will tell you otherwise.

    Also, papers finer than 600 really only came onto the scene when polyurethanes took over the auto repair industry. If you are using acrylic or nitro, you can easily skip anything beyond 600 and go directly to compound.
     
  5. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    piece of ash - really anything over 600 isn't needed? What type of compound should we use?

    I'm asking cause the first Macquire's compound I use says it will remove fine scratches from 1200 grit up. Is there a compound that would let you begin that process at 600 grit? That would make life so much easier in the finishing department. I saw a video on UTUBE where they guy went to compounds after 800 grit on an acoustic build but I couldn't tell what he was using for compounds/polishes.

    I like the micro mesh because you can wash them more than the paper, rather they last much longer IMO.
     
  6. piece of ash

    piece of ash Friend of Leo's

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    You could stop at 600 and use something like this:

    http://3mcollision.com/products/buf...super-duty-rubbing-compound-05955-gallon.html

    Mind you, there is nothing wrong with using finer grades, and proceeding to a finer compound. That said, I still wouldn't use a mesh... its not unidirectional... it has a grain of its own.

    If you wish to use the finer grades... be sure to alternate the basic sanding direction between grits. This way, you can easily see when the 1200 has removed the 600 scratches etc...

    Regardless, don't get caught up in the 600, 700, 800, 900, 1000, 1100... trip. The only winner there is sandpaper man. something like 600, 1200, 2000 makes more sense.
     
  7. dlmc

    dlmc NEW MEMBER!

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    Micro Mesh

    Hey Thanks for the info ! I guess I should have stated that I 'm Going with Nitro finish . I haven't started on the Alder Body yet , Its to cold right now in the garage ( can't work in the house ) . You know us California people we can't handle 40 degree weather ( LOL ) . So when it warms up I'll be good to go. Mean while I want to get my plan worked out . I have to order everything off the internet cuz the auto stores don't have much of a selection . I went to a real paint and body shop and they where almost double the price on the grits I need than the net . I'm Going to do the tele in blue transparent . I did my last one that way , Or I should say my buddy a cabinet maker helped me and shot the nitro for me . It was a Flame maple top w/ mahogany back in trans blue dye . Mahogany ! I'll Never do that again ! I didn't seal the pores enough in the mahogany and we had to put about 20 coats or more to fill in the pores and still didn't fill them all the way . It took about a year to finish because I had to leave at his shop . This time I'm doing it my self . I got pretty good at spraying from the last nightmare . I want to get the sanding and finishing right this time . The other one came out shiny ( a lot of scratches and pin holes ) , I'll need to go back and wet sand it out , the right way and and polish it out again . Its still not completed , 2 years later , It pissed me so bad I put in closet in time out (LOL ). That's why I want to get the wet sanding down by my self without my buddy telling me " Its Good Enough ! Take The Damn Thing Home ! Now I have all my own equipment and cleared the garage out to work.------ Hey Here's Something I did ( had to do ) cuz I kept sanding though the edges . I couldn't match the dye color the same on the edges to match the top to fix the sand throughs ( Note To Self mix a big jar of dye ) . So I gave up - I ended up taking my little trim router w/ a 1/8th round over Flush cutting bit and rounded over the top edge all around the maple top and gave it a light sanding . Mixed my dye color as close as I could and stained it . Still couldn't match the top color . So I went a head and shot the nitro over the edges away, couple coats , then shot the face again few times. It melted in perfectly . And then ..... WHOLLY CRAP ! .... It turned out like a Light Blue Binding all around the maple top in a lighter color then the top and body. TOTALLY AWESOME ! Like a pro planed it that way . My friend said it looked Professional ! To bad you F***ed up the rest of the body ! Maybe you guys might want to give it try. If you doing a natural binding , or light stain binding , This is the way to do it without trying to mask everything off . Just stain the top and back , shoot some clear over it , Rout it , sand lightly , Stain it or keep natural and spray over it . and you'll have a Totally Awesome Binding ..... Any way I guess this time when I start finish sanding I will use the 600 to level and work my way to 1200 to buff and polish . But it seems to me if I use the Mirco Mesh I would have a less chance of sand throughs as its a finer grit . I was thinking may some of you have used it before and maybe tell me how it worked for you . Thanks
     
  8. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity

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    I would not choose alder for a dyed clear finish as it can tend to dye a little blotchy. Alder is usually a paint grade wood. Ash or maple look a lot nicer dyed bur ash needs grain filler like mahogany. I have polished finishes with micromesh many times, I don't have a buffer and I don't like using a drill for a buffer because the speed is too low. It works just fine (pun intended) but you need to keep a soft cloth handy and with any dust off so it does not ball up and scratch the finish if working dry.

    This is ash with grain filler, sonic blue translucent nitro, clear, micromesh.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. musicalmartin

    musicalmartin Poster Extraordinaire

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    I use very fine Micro Mesh as the final finish on model autos which have to be perfect beyond the call of reason .I use poly on those .I also used it as a final polish finish on a nitro strat .Its really for poly where you cant polish as such just gradually work out the fine scratches of heavier grades .Nitro almost polishes itself .There is a school that says you dont need any polish if you have sprayed it correctly using leveller coats on nitro and the right mix on poly.In both cases it should come up wet and shiny and perfect ,in theory .
     
  10. orangedrop

    orangedrop Friend of Leo's

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    just to avoid confusion...
    Micro Mesh is not a mesh at all AFAIK.

    I believe the "Mesh" refers to mesh grades which is why the numbers don't jive.

    This is not the same as Abranet which on a R/O works magic, nor is it related to 3M mesh sandpaper like I imagine both Ash and I have used for sanding plaster work. Cough cough:eek:

    Micro Mesh is amazing stuff, and is usually used dry.
     
  11. Glen Smith

    Glen Smith RIP

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  12. Ronsonic

    Ronsonic Tele-Afflicted

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    Those pads look like the ones I got in a headlight resurfacing kit. Should be great for fret work.

    And as a guy with color vision issues, they did a great job on the color codes.
     
  13. TEAM LANDRETH

    TEAM LANDRETH Tele-Meister

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    I use the Lee Valley pads on my R.O.S. I'll wet sand to 600 and switch over to the sander. Starting at 1500, which will cut more than you would expect, and stepping up all the way to 12000 doesn't take very long at all. The sides you will have to do by hand, but the pads are very flexible and with elbow grease it shouldn't take too long.
    One nice feature is any build up that may happen is easily removed with a utility blade used as a scraper. They will last a lot longer this way.

    I was blown away at the results and highly recommend micro mesh.
     
  14. piece of ash

    piece of ash Friend of Leo's

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    Yikes! I didn't realize that THIS micro-mesh has a redefined grit numbering system. Any prior advice is based on the archaic (Windows 7) grit numbering system.

    Usually, when people try to reinvent the wheel... they come up with another wheel.
     
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