Melody Maker build

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by flatfive, Oct 14, 2011.

  1. flatfive

    flatfive Friend of Leo's

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    Sounds good; let me know if you need a small piece of mahogany
    (a job Dave volunteered me for :lol:).

    Excellent!!

    I enjoyed the Dumpster MM diversion. Anyway, won't be more
    going on here for a couple of months at least (unless the neck
    snaps off my MM). Oh -- and the demo video...
     
  2. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Oh, I'm generous to a fault! :lol::lol::lol:
     
  3. flatfive

    flatfive Friend of Leo's

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    Where would we be without you? :eek:
     
  4. jipp

    jipp Friend of Leo's

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    i never find any thing like that in the trash around here.. you must live near a music s tore? also that other rout. you could use that too add a nanomag for a acoustic tones ( i want to try this pickup my self made by shadow. you see i have some other pickups made in the usa by this german company.. epi had them make a small run of them in the early 90s from what little info i can find on them.. the price was right free as the music store was going out of business.. so i think it will be fitting to get a nanomag to g with them).. and you would not have to alter anything.. that rout for the wires and what not is there. i agree with the plug. it will be under a pick guard anyhow if you use what it had originally from the out line. what a cool fine.. i see no reason why the neck wont work you may have to do a fret level and what not ( which i need to learn to do so i can fix my old yamaha se 200 sigh my first love i mean my first guitar (
    congrats on the find and thanks for trying to save her.. im so tired of our throw away society. mom raised me to be a hippie. im not a radical one but i do try to treat things with respect and know we do not have endless resources like they use to think back in the day 1700;s? please post pictures of when you finish her. thank you so much. you rock dude.
    chris.
     
  5. OpenG Capo4

    OpenG Capo4 Friend of Leo's

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    Once when I was taking out the trash I found a pretty nice Washburn acoustic in the dumpster. Headstock broken at the joint. Some maintenance guy from the apartment complex caught me just as I had digged it out and tried to make me put it back. I told him those breaks were common and easy to fix and he started cussing. I let it go at that point because it wasn't worth the trouble.

    When the college kids move out in May they leave all their unwanted stuff behind. The apartment complex will just put out a dumpster and they'll toss their perfectly good stuff into it and it'll all go to a landfill. I once got a golf bag full of balls, tees, and a full set of clubs out of a dumpster. All that cheap "dorm room" furniture is MDF and great for making templates.
     
  6. flatfive

    flatfive Friend of Leo's

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    I think I just figured this out. They must have used dark brown
    or black filler on both the back and *front* of the body. The
    dark brown in the grain in front would then show up through the
    yellow paint as orange.
     
  7. flatfive

    flatfive Friend of Leo's

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    Hi all. I'm back on this after spending a week or two
    to recuperate from the challenge.

    Here's the guitar today:

    [​IMG]

    After getting to know it a little, I've learned two things:
    the pickups (Tonerider Alnico 4 Classic) sound good, but
    the neck is way too chunky.

    So I need to sort out the neck, along with doing a sunburst
    like my old Gibson.

    First step is removing the hardware, but there are a couple
    of problems. The first is removing the bridge mounting
    studs. Here's a pic:

    [​IMG]

    The key thing is that the bottom is closed, not open, so
    the usual trick for removing the studs can't be used.

    I've got a similar problem with the tuner bushings. I drilled
    the tuner holes with two diameters for a tight fit, but don't
    see how to remove them.

    [​IMG]

    Any thoughts on the right way to remove the bridge
    studs and tuner bushings are appreciated!

    For the neck, used a contour gauge to measure a neck
    I like, and transferred the shape to cardboard.

    [​IMG]

    My only concern here is missing the truss rod cavity.
     
  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I bought the stew mac kit years ago. It looks like a large socket ( socket wrench socket) like shape that fits over the stud and a bolt with washer passes through a hole in the top, into the stud. There is a cushioning washer at the bottom of the socket to avoid finish damage. When you tighten the bolt, the stud get pulled up assuming the bolt doesn't bottom out. So basically you need to rig up a puller. I've stacked large steel washers on top of each other to do it occasionally.

    Tuner bushings.... get a dowel that is the size of the hole or a hair under and tap it from the opposite side. They usually go flying so make sure you don't lose them.... How do I know this?.......I've used a drill bit shank too for odd sizes.
     
  9. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    The bushing is closed on the bottom? Drill a hole in it and remove as you normally would. Same on the tuner bushings. Drill out the back of the headstock to match the front and push the bushings out. The bushings won't harm a drill bit and a slight chamfer on the bushing end won't be an issue. With careful setup in a drill press, both operations should be a snap.

    The Stew Mac jig is costly for what it does. You can make one pretty easily. Theirs uses all-thread with machined tips for various thread sizes. Using a bolt with matching threads works just as well. You may have to stack washers under the bolt head to get a tight fit...depending on pvc pipe and bolt length.
     

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  10. flatfive

    flatfive Friend of Leo's

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    guitarbuilder and Guitarnut -- thanks very much, guys, for
    the quick reply. :)

    This morning after waking up I realized the idea you
    suggested for the bridge studs, but didn't have such an
    elegant design as you suggested. I was thinking of a
    chunk of hard wood with a hole drilled through it the
    size of the stud. The use of PVC pipe and washers will
    be much simpler.

    Regarding the the tuner bushing -- I can't use the idea
    guitarbuilder suggests because each tuner hole was
    drilled with bits of two different diameters. The smaller
    hole has the same diameter as the inner diameter of
    the bushing.
     
  11. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    Glenn, I looked back thru the thread and didn't see any direct specs for the TR or it's slot. Yours looks like the smaller of the dual actions rods out there which I believe need a 3/8" deep channel. Since you had depth for a filler strip, I'm going to assume at least a 7/16" channel was cut. Backing out the 7/16" channel and 1/4"" for the fretboard at it's thickest, that leaves less than 1/8" of the .770" behind the truss rod. .082" to be exact. Maybe the fretboard isn't the full 1/4" but it would worry me being this thin. If you could live with .8125" total thickness, that would give you a full .125" under the TR nut. Guessing the .94" on the drawing is the current thickness, you'd be dropping over 1/8" in thickness in the new carve.
     
  12. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    I think either would work but unless you just want to have the jig on hand for future use, I would drill out the bottom of the bushing. Then just drop in a PU slug, thread in a bridge stud and you're done. :cool:
     
  13. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    I forgot to mention...great to see you back on this one. It almost has me inspired to brave the high temps in the shop today. :rolleyes:
     
  14. flatfive

    flatfive Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks, Mark. I didn't have any PVC or other pipe so just used
    some MDF. It was easy as pie.

    A scrap of 1/4" MDF with a 1/2" hole and some washers.

    [​IMG]

    To turn the screw I used the edge of a paint can opener
    with some tape to protect the finish.

    After getting it halfway out I switched to some 3/4" maple.
    (The washers weren't quite as large as the stud.)

    [​IMG]

    Only took 5 minutes for both studs. Thanks again Mark
    and guitarbuilder.

    The tuner bushings look to be a trickier problem to solve.
    I was thinking of just drilling out the smaller diameter of
    each hole to make it the size of the larger diameter, but
    drilling out a 1/4" hole with a 5/8" bit is inviting disaster.

    I can't use a step bit to start the 5/8" hole because it
    would hit the bushing; same with a reamer.
     
  15. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    Cool! Glad to see it worked out.


    On the tuner bushings, since you're uncomfortable with drilling them out and you want to keep the smaller holes on back, take a dowel and taper it so it's a snug fit in the bushing. Cut a slit into the end and tap it into the bushing from the front. Then tap a thin bladed screwdriver into the slit from behind. This will wedge the dowel and you should have a good enough grip to work the bushing free.
     
  16. flatfive

    flatfive Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks -- good idea! I'll try it.
     
  17. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    You might want to put a small shoulder on the dowel so it doesn't extend past the bushing. It it did, it might grab onto the headstock instead of the bushing.
     

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  18. flatfive

    flatfive Friend of Leo's

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    That was brilliant! :D

    Worked like a charm. I'm going to file that away for this
    and similar problems in the future.

    Luckily I had a piece of dowel around that was about the
    right size. I crudely cut a slot in it with a razor saw.

    [​IMG]

    The pic's not good, but I actually made a second cut
    at an angle, so the screwdriver blade could enter the slot.

    I sprayed a little spray adhesive on the outside of the dowel,
    pushed it in the bushing, and knocked the screwdriver in
    with a rubber mallet.

    [​IMG]

    Bushing popped out.

    [​IMG]

    The first one took a little persuasion, but you quickly get
    the feel for it. I got all of them out in minutes. Brill!

    Thanks Mark!

    I also slimmed the neck down. I was rushing so didn't take
    pics, but here's what I did:
    • used the ROSS belt sander along the middle of the back of the neck to get the thickness right
    • used a rasp to make some facets along the length of the neck
    • blended the facets together, again using a rasp
    • switched to 80 grit paper, then 120, then 180, using a dowel on the transitions

    A while ago guitarbuilder suggested the use of facets while
    carving the neck. Having done a few necks, the value of this
    method is clearer. If you just kind of randomly shape the neck,
    it's not easy to spot assymetry from side to side, or other
    problems.

    It's easy to spot problems with the facets, and once they're
    finished, not much more material needs to be removed.
     
  19. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

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    :cool:
     
  20. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Poster Extraordinaire

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    In the 70's, the "books by Irving Sloane, David Russell Young, Arthur Overholtzer and Joseph Wallo were the only sources of information commonly available" to quote Steven Dembroski. The facet idea is from one of the first two (prob David Russell Young). These books (when available) are goldmines of info. With the exception of a few eccentricities, it all still applies. Anything I ever learned about making a fine instrument, I learned from them ;)


    Good luck on the burst Glenn, that is one fine looking guitar. Your challenge reminded me a lot of it, brothers from another mother, so to speak. Well done on both ;)

    Dave
     
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