Meguiars Scratch-X 2.0 - To buff out scratches

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by dreamingtele, Jul 28, 2019.

  1. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,624
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Okay,

    so this is purely against the trend of relic'ng and all..

    I just got a Squier body that has noticeable light scratches from cleaning, picks, some usage markts.. Good thing is no dents, dings, paint chips and all..

    Ive read about the Meguiars stuff, and I'm ready to buy, but unfortunately, I dont have tools, or access to it. I dont want to send this to my guitar tech as it involves a lot of money..

    Of course, I can just play this and dont care anymore, but at the very least, I want to prep the body and clean it, as I will also fix up loose pickguard screws that arent biting on wood anymore thats so common with these Squiers..

    So I'm ready to buy this. Without tools, what else do I need that I can just use?
    1. Microfiber Cloth
    2. Meguiars Scratch X
    3. ???
    4. ???
    5. ???

    I understand its gonna take some elbow grease, but at least it will improve it and do my own scratches on it!

    There's also this one
    https://www.guitarscratchremover.com/collections/players-kits-guitar-scratch-remover

    But Im here to save money!
     
  2. bender66

    bender66 Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    6,504
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2010
    Location:
    on my bike
    I dont know if you'll get that stuff out without a buffing wheel but I'm sure someone has found alternatives to one.

    Does the Meguiars have silicone in it?
     
    RodeoTex likes this.
  3. Chuckster

    Chuckster Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    547
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2017
    Location:
    Boston/Cape Cod
    I use Maguiars Mirror Glaze Swirl Remover #9... the Scratch-X seemed too abrasive for my liking.
     
    Dismalhead likes this.
  4. Dismalhead

    Dismalhead Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    56
    Posts:
    6,168
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2014
    Location:
    Sacramento, California
    I'll second that.

    Just Mirror Glaze and a soft clean cotton cloth. Sit in front of the TV for an evening and all those little swirls and scratches will slowly disappear. Very cathartic.
     
    Chuckster likes this.
  5. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,624
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Okay, Well nothing into the paint, The body is black which makes it more noticeable, but its nothing too deep, its probably like the scratches you will get when cleaning it overly...

    This is the body.

    [​IMG]

    Will this work on the Pickguard as well?
     
    Chuckster likes this.
  6. Dismalhead

    Dismalhead Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    56
    Posts:
    6,168
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2014
    Location:
    Sacramento, California
    'tis but a flesh wound.

    Most of that should polish right out. It's not going to make it look worse. Every guitar I've used Mirror Glaze on has come out better than expected. As for the pickguard, I've never tried it on one. If it doesn't work, buy a new one.

    That is a sweet looking body. Something about that style with the chrome and black. Very tasty.
     
    Chuckster likes this.
  7. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,624
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Its actually a partscaster I made!
    Thread here: https://www.tdpri.com/threads/birthday-ngd-p90-partscaster-tele-content.965667/

    I bought a new Gotoh Bridge for it, as the saddle screws are stripped and would not go up any higher despite having more height to crank it up.. Thats my only issue with these Squiers, as the hardware are usually very cheap..

    so while the bridge is off, I thought, maybe I can buff out the scratches as well?

    I've looked for a cheaper pickguard alternative but the two P90 version are a bit expensive, but not uncommon.. I'm thinking of delaying ordering a pickguard when I have the money to upgrade or change the covers of the P90's to cream and I will buy a tort to compliment the all black (including a dark rosewood neck) color scheme
     
  8. Dismalhead

    Dismalhead Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    56
    Posts:
    6,168
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2014
    Location:
    Sacramento, California
    Tortoise on black does look great, especially if you have a rosewood fretboard.
     
  9. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,624
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    I would think so too!

    Okay, so back to topic, just cotton cloth? No foam? Microfiber?
     
  10. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    21,183
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2012
    Location:
    Montana
    Here is your solution. I have used it on my strat and a Les Paul. The two step process uses a lot of elbow grease and some patience, but it is made for this specific application and it works better than expected from personal experience. I could not see any evidence of a fairly deep scratch in the poly coat once I was done. "Eternashine" players kit. IMG_4036.JPG
     
    Jim_in_PA likes this.
  11. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,624
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Oh wow, yeah I referenced that in my original post, so it really works? Im a bit hesitant as I dont know if it really works, but they have a vid on youtube showing it.. still hesitant.. felt like too good to be true and I have to import it from US to Australia and shipping is not cheap.
     
  12. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    21,183
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2012
    Location:
    Montana
    It is not cheap, but what do you want your guitar to look like? The two tubes are surprisingly small, yet is could probably do dozens if not more larger scratches. I've only used it twice, but it is nice to have in the toolbox ... just in case. It comes with a cloth already. What is nice about the product is that once you have polished out a scratch, but you can still see it, you can just go through the process again and again until you are satisfied. Light scratches are pretty easy. If you have ever rubbed out an old car paint job, it is a similar amount of effort, just on a much smaller surface. Those scratches near the bridge would be best done without the pickguard on, but I think you could do it without removing the bridge. As long as the scratches are not in the paint, this stuff will do the job, but those scratches will take an hour or so. Turn on some music and the process seems rather zen-like.

    Anyway, I have not tried the Meguires, so I have nothing to compare with. Perhaps a local guitar shop can get it for you to save shipping costs?
     
  13. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,624
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Well, the Meguiars scratch X is plentily available here, other Meguiars products suggested above isnt. and I have to import it, same with the guitarscratchremover players kit.. I can ask my guitar tech if he can order it and I'll just buy it from him, he regularly buys stuff from Stewmac anyway..

    I'll be taking off the original bridge and replacing it with Gotoh as the 4 saddle screws from that bridge were stripped and not biting the grooves anymore, I just wrestled it to get it to a proper playing action.. so while the bridge is off, I want to do some polishing and cleaning..

    I have a cordless drill/drive that I want to use to lessen the "elbow grease" a little and get it assembled right away as I really want to use this for a give in 2 weeks. LOL
     
  14. dan40

    dan40 Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    1,300
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2015
    Location:
    Richmond Va
    You can purchase a small 3 or 4" foam buffing wheel for an electric drill at most Harbor Freight stores. Makes the buffing job much easier. Just take your time and go lightly, not staying in one spot for too long, and you shouldn't have any problems.

    StewMac also sells a nice buffing wheel and polish if you prefer...https://www.stewmac.com/Materials_and_Supplies/Sanding_and_Polishing/Buffing_and_Polishing/

    They also have a video showing how to properly use the buffing wheel if you have never done it before.
     
  15. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,624
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Yes I've never done this before!

    Honestly, I wasnt really finnicky about scratches, but I never had a black guitar! but since this is a Squier body that I can try to buff, if I'm successful, I may move on buffing my AVRI62 as it needs a full clean too! LOL
     
  16. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    21,183
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2012
    Location:
    Montana
    Regardless of what you use, I would highly advise to stay away from buffing wheels of any sort. Doing it by hand will allow it to feather well into the rest of the guitar finish. Consider this a restoration instead of instant gratification. Buffing wheels by someone with lots of experience can work, but until that experience is gained there are a lot of divots, burns and other damage created. Trust me on this.
     
  17. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,624
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    I will trust you on this! I will do it by hand and see where it takes me!
     
    Obsessed likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.