Manners....

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Bluesboy3, May 13, 2020.

  1. Fretting out

    Fretting out Friend of Leo's

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    This reminds me of of my best friend, ha

    My friends standard dress code was an old t-shirt and a pair of Mountain Dew or Dr.pepper pajama pants, Everywhere! No matter where we went that’s what he wore (even through high school even though we had a dress code, he was one of those kids the teachers wouldn’t even argue with) he was sloppy and would have loud conversation or say crude things out in public

    Gosh how this would bother me, but I knew I wasn’t going to change him and love him for who he is (minus a couple features) but I let him be and he didn’t bother me about things I did that probably bothered him

    I know I probably said something once or twice and it just ended up bad so why ruin a good relationship over some little things
     
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  2. ping-ping-clicka

    ping-ping-clicka Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    manners spare us all our more unsavory aspects as courtesy saves us from our brutish natures
    or
    courtesy spare us all our more unsavory aspects as manners saves us from our brutish natures
     
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  3. Nick Fanis

    Nick Fanis Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    The difference between a neanderthal and a homo sapiens.
     
  4. fattboyzz

    fattboyzz Tele-Meister

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    Alot of people today are downright rude !

    I believe a good percentage of society just doesn't care.

    It's pretty sad :( .
     
  5. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    So how would you do it if you had your own way? Butter the whole loaf on top and then tear it?

    Or maybe just skip the butter and go at the whole loaf?
     
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  6. Fretting out

    Fretting out Friend of Leo's

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    Sorry for so many posts but watching the “Mr.Bungle” video got me thinking

    The biggest thing that irks be is littering! (I guess that can be apart of proper manners)

    I can’t stand seeing litter especially next to the proper receptacles or when people throw things out of their cars

    I guess it was ingrained into me at school, in 3rd or 4th grade we were taught about the environmental impact of littering, the teacher told us how the rings on top of six packs get into the water system or anywhere for that matter and animals will get there body parts stuck on them, then about how cigarette butts will get accidentally eaten by ducks and such and expand in their tummies causing harm
    I may not have taken the lesson about not smoking to heart but you better bet I always have a receptacle with me or put the field stripped butt In my pocket for proper disposal later

    I can’t stand seeing butts or people throwing them out their car windows, I always revert back to the poor tummies of the ducks of the world
     
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  7. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    I agree. If you are video chatting don't eat or drink. One pickup manufacturer is always drinking coffee or Scotch, and talking about it, to the extent where the pickups are not even visible.
    I was brought up with very strict morals and manners , so , one tends to expect the same or similar in others..
    Maybe the disaster of 2020 will make us, and our children, reflect on how we treat eachother in the future. As my Mother used to quote " Do unto others..... "
     
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  8. johnny k

    johnny k Friend of Leo's

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    How do you hold properly a knife and fork ? Does it apply to lefties too ? ;)
     
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  9. notmyusualuserid

    notmyusualuserid Friend of Leo's

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    That problem wouldn't arise, because any lazy sod that went out in pyjamas would be no friend of mine.

    Judgemental? Probably, but you're also judged by the company you keep.
     
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  10. johnny k

    johnny k Friend of Leo's

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    I don't know if it has been mentionned yet, but what you think are proper manners might be considered very rude in other cultures. Japan comes to mind.
     
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  11. dfbach

    dfbach TDPRI Member

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    There’s a difference between being polite and following etiquette. Both, I guess, can be considered manners, but for me, politeness is more important than etiquette. Still, someone who takes offence at the way someone else is using their cutlery will have a less enjoyable meal.


    The problem for me has been that manners are regional and often arbitrary. I’ve lived in a few different countries over the years. The manners I was taught growing up in the US are not universal. One example: In Germany, where I live now, you hold your fork in your left hand, your knife in the right, and you never switch. If you’re not using one of your hands, you keep it on the table, NEVER in your lap. I had a hard time getting used to that. When I’m visiting friends in Italy, however, they frown when I use my fork in my left hand unless I’m cutting something. In Germany, you use your knife to push food onto your fork. In Italy, that’s considered crude. The list of regional differences is seemingly endless. Blowing your nose in public is done all the time in Germany. In the US, it’s considered rude. In Japan, blowing your nose is about the worst thing you can do, while snorting is perfectly OK.


    Anyway, it’s a strangely fascinating topic. Thanks for bringing it up!
     
  12. Larry F

    Larry F Doctor of Teleocity Vendor Member

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    My dad pounded the concept of courtesy from a young age. When I went off to the drugstore the first few times, my dad would remind me over and over to be courteous when in public.
     
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  13. Si G X

    Si G X Tele-Afflicted

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    That comes under 'dining etiquette' for me, I find it pompous and ridiculous to be honest. When my family eat we sit at the table together, laugh, chat and enjoy our meal and each others company. Often we aren't even using a knife and fork, we are using our fingers, chopsticks, spoons... whatever, it's not important to me, what's important to me is that we are together, we are enjoying the food and the experience.
     
  14. stxrus

    stxrus Friend of Leo's

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    I think manners are becoming a lost art. Not just with kids but many adults
    Here we say “good morning”, “good afternoon”, and “good night”. Each is a greeting depending on the time of the day. You enter a room and say the appropriate greeting. Those in the room respond back. Meet someone in passing it’s the same. It’s a small that is so civilized

    I enjoy being stateside and get into an elevator. “Good morning” and watch their faces because you’re not supposed to speak or make eye contact in an elevator. It’s just manners
     
  15. Thinline casket

    Thinline casket Tele-Meister

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    Being kind and respectful are the most important things.

    Not tailgating, opening the door, please and thank you are all signs of respect.

    How you hold your knife or whether your jelly is all down your shirt is how you respect yourself, not others. I could care less. As long as you clean up after yourself I say slob onward. Just don't get it on me or my stuff. :D
     
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  16. Thinline casket

    Thinline casket Tele-Meister

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    Addendum:
    Keeping your kids from running around tearing up the store, restaurant, or another's house is MUCH MORE IMPORTANT than how you hold your knife or where you put your napkin!!!
     
  17. stormsedge

    stormsedge Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Being polite and courteous costs one nothing, and has potentially great gains. My military career placed me in a position of leadership where I could choose (for the most part) how I treated those around me. I didn't realize until many, many years later how positively simple courtesy and manners affected those around me, especially my subordinates. I still barked and bit when needed, but it was not/has not been my normal approach/demeanor, and those around me knew when I barked things were becoming critical. Many of my peers were not that way, and imo made everything ridiculously hard for those around them...even to the point of making themselves unapproachable---something I always felt detrimental to the overall good and mission---and something that saved the day more than once because folks thought they could approach me and offer opinion/observation. Simple manners are a piece of it, but I realize some of the specific manners my mother taught me have left the building. Keep smiling.
     
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  18. ben smith

    ben smith Tele-Holic

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    manners don't cost anything my mum used to say to me as a kid
     
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  19. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I thought fork in left hand/knife in right hand was the normal way to use utensils for right handers...

    except when you don't need a knife, then you might use a fork in your right hand...

    I live in a smaller community and use the same stores/businesses mostly, it's easy to be friendly/polite to people you see regularly... and I carry that attitude where ever I go...

    I'd be the one to say a small greeting of some sort to those in a lift when I walked in.... whether anyone responds is their business, I never expect people to respond, really...

    just being polite... and comfortable around strangers ...
     
  20. tery

    tery Doctor of Teleocity

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    I would never embarrass my friends , guests , or you with my perceived superior etiquette .
    … I am above that :)
     
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