Making setlists

eddiewagner

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Nov 6, 2005
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ROCK!linghausen/germany
The oldfashioned way:
C5E15365-CA05-435F-9E45-DC833D01CA07.jpeg
 

Tele-beeb

Friend of Leo's
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Apr 2, 2012
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3,850
Location
The Bluegrass
I clicked in hopes of seeing a formula…
like:
Expressive Upbeat Fast Song
Another Bold Upbeat song
Take it Down a notch
Smooth Listening song
Flow into a slow/ballad dance
Back up-beat
Long jam/crowd interaction
Another dance/listener
One everyone knows
A set-ending high note
But not that, I was hoping for something not that
Ha
 

bottlenecker

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Dec 6, 2015
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7,134
Location
Wisconsin
I tend to not play sets longer than will fit on a bar napkin at the last minute when I forgot to make set lists.

Formula:

1. Midtempo easiest to execute good enough to get attention song.

2. Another one of those.

3. Higher energy, top shelf song.

4, 5. A couple of downers.

6, 7. A couple of mid tempo palate cleansers.

8. Polka time.

9. Serious downer.

10. Loudest, good enough to close song.
 

schmee

Telefied
Ad Free Member
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Jun 2, 2003
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22,677
Location
northwest
I make 'em every gig. Send em out early. We get about half way through maybe, then start to wander on song choice. If it's an unfamiliar gig we may have to change things early on, depending on "feeling the crowd". For repeat gigs it works well.
One slow every set, enough dance songs to satisfy people.
SampleSetlist.jpg
 

douellette

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Feb 25, 2011
Posts
117
Location
Kalamazoo, MI
We mix our own sound at 90% of our gigs, so we start with a song by our singer who doesn't run the mixing board, while I go out front (wireless) and listen and signal to our sax player who makes adjustments to the mix based on my hand signals.

Often that first song will be someone saying "funky blues in A" or "driving blues in E" and the bass player will set the feel and the singer will sing lyrics he knows over the different feel. That keeps things a bit fresher for us. We try to get all three soloists in the mix on that first song.

Then, if the sound is really close to set, our other singer (sax player) will sing one, and I'll go out front one more time to verify that we're good to go for the night. Then on the next song we go back to the first singer to have the sax player go out front briefly to confirm my ears.

And then we're off and running for the next four hours. Our first few "real" songs (after we're set with the mix) are usually 3-4 originals from our latest album.

We don't usually write out setlists for bar gigs, and I just call songs on stage from our list of 70-80 tunes, plus ones that we forgot that we know to mix it up on ourselves to stay on our toes.
 

Happy Enchilada

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Mar 25, 2021
Posts
4,083
Location
God's Country
I tend to not play sets longer than will fit on a bar napkin at the last minute when I forgot to make set lists.

Formula:

1. Midtempo easiest to execute good enough to get attention song.

2. Another one of those.

3. Higher energy, top shelf song.

4, 5. A couple of downers.

6, 7. A couple of mid tempo palate cleansers.

8. Polka time.

9. Serious downer.

10. Loudest, good enough to close song.
ANYTIME is POLKA TIME.🤪
 

Cosmic Cowboy

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Dec 10, 2020
Posts
1,573
Location
New Mexico
Opener: Something rhythmic to get the band in sync.

Followed by: Some upbeat tunes, band introduction etc.

Couple of mellow/slow dancers

Something lively to end the 1st set.

Repeat
 

keithb7

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Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Posts
5,459
Location
Western Canada
I too prefer paper versus digital devices. Recently a band member had his ipod program sh*t the bed. He lost all of his lyrics, personal notes and arrangements. No thanks.

We place songs that generate lower crowd response, into the first set. We hit the second set hard right after the break, with a couple well-known dance numbers. The third set everyone in the crowd is well lube'd up and dancing. The sweaty dance numbers fall into place then. They always call for more by the time we have them riled up through the 3rd set. Then we have a couple of hot encores. Works pretty well for us and the crowd.

We used to take 2 breaks. 3 sets. Now we have so many great songs, we often take 1 break and have 2 sets across 3 + hours of performing.
 




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