Lost One Of The Flock.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Stringbanger, Dec 12, 2019.

  1. Stringbanger

    Stringbanger Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Olive Oyl became the first of my flock to kick the bucket. I noticed the other night that she wasn’t in the coop, but she was lying in the pen below the coop. I shined a light on her and I could tell she was alive. I thought maybe she was clucking or just in a mood. Yesterday I found her dead in the pen. She was a Rhode Island red that looked similar to this one:
    3654FF90-71AD-4321-A3DC-537D3E51CA50.jpeg

    Now I have 3 left. We got her in a trade with my neighbor. We needed two hens and we gave him a rooster. We raised the other two hens from chicks.

    This all began in the spring of 2012, and we had great egg production for about 4-5 years. The last egg was laid this spring, and when I picked it up, it felt like rubber.

    So my girls are pets now, and from what I have read, their life expectancy is 7-8 years. I suspect that the others don’t have much longer. Oh well, it has been quite an experience. I don’t know if we will get new chickens or not.
     
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  2. Dan German

    Dan German Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Bummer. We were part of an Egg Collective. We all paid for hens, and a friend nearby kept them at her house and took care of them and we all got discount eggs. Sadly, over the past few months, the raccoons have done them all in, even our contribution, Yolk-O Ono. I always enjoyed the silly birds when we went over there. I will miss them.
     
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  3. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Hey sorry man. Even birds have a personality and you can become attached to them for sure.
     
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  4. tery

    tery Poster Extraordinaire

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    Pretty bird .
     
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  5. Stringbanger

    Stringbanger Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Thanks. Yes they do have personality! Olive Oyl, for example, was always “talking”. Louise is friendly, and she is the only one that will let you pick her up. Stinka is a big scaredy-cat, and Esther is laid-back and goes with the flow.
     
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  6. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    This is why my mother would never eat the beef that came from a bull my brother raised....it had a name. "Bully" was slaughtered and butchered when pretty young and was some of the best tasting beef we ever had, but, well, he had a name. Don't name things you intend on eating, I guess.
     
  7. Bristlehound

    Bristlehound Friend of Leo's

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    I'm afraid that chickens will die for apparantly no reason at all... and I still find it sad when one of the girls goes to join the flock celestial. Amber is the only one of our 'originals' who is still with us. The fresh eggs are just lovely, but I find the responsiblity of looking after living creatures that are always under threat to be daunting.
     
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  8. Skydog1010

    Skydog1010 Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

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    Sorry for your loss, animals do find a way to grow deep fondness in our hearts no matter their purpose. Why I could never have a casual farm/ranch, plus I'm a city slicker.

    I can hunt and harvest meat that way, but prefer the butcher shops or grocery store method.

    Now especially I have grown too tenderhearted to even find zeal in hunting.

    That's a great photo of a RI Red.
     
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  9. Stringbanger

    Stringbanger Telefied Ad Free Member

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    These are layer hens, which people typically don’t eat. My buddy up the street ate his flock when they started to die off. He said they were very scrawny. I doubt he named his, because he had around 15.
     
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  10. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    We had chickens when I was a kid, and they were certainly pets, loved and cared for after they stopped laying.
    Seems like we kept getting another few as time passed, since we had built pens and gotten used to our clucky lads and lasses.
    Eventually our Maine town banned livestock, as tourism pushed subsistence living off to the fringe.

    Sorry you lost the old girl...
     
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  11. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I rented a room with a family who had a gallery and raised chickens, rabbits, dogs & cats, and eventually turkeys.
    The chickens were for eggs but the bunnies and turkeys were for meat.
    The artist couple were a painter husband and photographer wife.
    The animal pens had painting in them, one I really liked in the chicken coop was covered with poop.
    Being a gallery property it was all arty and decorative.

    No bunnies were killed or eaten!
    Even the turkeys lived for years, and they just couldn't bring themselves to do the due.
    Eventually a friend volunteered and killed a turkey.
    After roasting it sat in the fridge.
    Nobody would eat it.
     
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  12. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    My dad grew up on a farm that raised chickens for their eggs to sell. His mom would cook the tough scrawny ones that stop laying eggs as a common dinner item. If guests came to dinner is was a younger tastier/tender chicken for the special meal, which being part of a huge family, he ate little of the good ones.

    To this day, at age 90, my dad is still not a big fan of chicken and often talks about how bad the old ones tasted. So, you are probably doing the right thing.
     
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  13. Guitarzan

    Guitarzan Poster Extraordinaire

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    In general, people do not realize that the chickens we eat are hybrid broilers bred to purpose and fed to purpose. Free ranging barnyard chickens and layers in general not fed that way do not produce the same quality of meat. I don't really care to eat one of those barnyard zooters again.

    When people bought batches of chicks for the purpose of having laying hens, they would end up having roosters (too many roosters) in the batch. The roosters would go under the axe. Making a stew of some sort with them is about the best way to use that meat, they are not that good for cutting and frying.
     
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