Loose fretboard

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Rocky creek, Jan 23, 2019.

  1. Rocky creek

    Rocky creek TDPRI Member

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    A buddy of mine brought me a guitar that he has had for a while that had a squeak to it. When I inspected it I noticed the fretboard was loose from about the 1st fret to the 4th. I was wondering if I could just inject glue under it and clamp it back down. Not wanting to take the whole fretboard off.
     
  2. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Afflicted

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    Take the fretboard off (heat is your friend), clean off all the old glue, reglue it. Level frets as required.
     
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  3. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    Get some Hobby Shop Cyanoacrylate glue. (5 second glue) Probably the "thin" variety. But there is also "very thin" thick, super thick etc.
    -Have all your clamping figured out properly before gluing.
    -mask off the neck finish and fretboard with good fine line masking tape leaving just the glue joint crack exposed. (The glue destroys finish)
    -Squeeze glue into both sides at the joint, it will wick in fast. (for instance, when gluing in frets, you put a drop or two in one side at the fretboard edge and it wicks through to the other side in 1-2 seconds!)
    - Clamp and leave it for a few hours to be sure.
     
  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Use heat and a spatula to remove the fretboard. Clean off the old glue until you are back to level wood. Reglue with yellow glue or hide glue. Use a clamping caul and enough clamps to do the job. Adding glues that are inappropriate for this joint only make a repair persons job harder the next time it needs attention.
     
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  5. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Afflicted

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    What Marty said. Also when you have the f/b off you can figure out why it failed in the first place. Is a truss rod pushing up on that end of the neck?
     
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  6. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    this is what I have to do to my Beltone guitar for the same reason

    look on line tons of videos on youtube

     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2019
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  7. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    There's no way to avoid the truss rod pushing up at the fretboard, either in the middle or at the ends, as the case may be. That's what it's supposed to do in order to work.

    And if in fact the trussrod had something to do with this failure, then the fretboard was never properly glued in the first place.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2019
  8. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    There is no reason to remove the fretboard unless it does not mate to the neck well there is also every reason NOT to use anything except an animal based wood glue to do this repair. Super glue is not advisable for this repair. If that guitar is of much value, imho it needs to be in the hands of a guitar repairperson. It would take perhaps five minutes to prep and glue that fretboard.
    If there is something impeding the mating of the surfaces, then the board might need to be removed. That is rare, ime. I have never had a board come back off of the neck in such a job as this....and I have never removed a board to fix such a problem.
     
  9. Rocky creek

    Rocky creek TDPRI Member

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    DD4EA85C-A0ED-4E96-9F18-054B920D4AB0.jpeg F6966D97-81B4-45E0-B5E8-5C419F2D1FDB.jpeg 77CABEBF-39E3-4BEF-9888-F99DD5D71592.jpeg
     
  10. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Is that an opening of the joint between the headstock and the neck below that fretboard separation in the second picture?
    Regardless, there is no reason to remove that fretboard.
     
  11. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    My Grandpappy always used to say "You can either do it right, or you can do it over".
     
  12. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    As Freeman and Marty have already said, remove the fretboard, clean it up and reglue it back on.

    Who knows what kind of crap may be stuck down in that crack that is going to prevent a proper repair otherwise. And that will result in it not being properly glued yet again.

    For a home repair with little resources on a cheap guitar, that may be fine. But no reputable repair guy is going to skimp like that. It's not worth the risk.
     
  13. CraigB

    CraigB Tele-Afflicted

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    It seems to me you could also risk buggering up the truss rod if you wick thin CA into it.
     
  14. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Afflicted

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    It looks like a crack running into the neck stick which would imply that the head of the guitar has taken a thump and there is more damage than just the f/b to neck joint. If so and its a fracture into the wood of the neck then it might be possible to repair by opening the crack and forcing glue in, then clamping. The problem with trying to reglue the previous glue joint is that normally new AR glue doesn't bond well to old glue.

    If the wood is actually broken then I may change my comment about the need to remove the fretboard. The break on this neck started at the f/b seam but went down into the neck itself - I was able to work AR into the crack and clamp it

    IMG_4740.JPG IMG_4744.JPG IMG_4743.JPG IMG_4745.JPG

    I did take the truss rod nut off and wrap waxed paper around the end to try to keep glue from getting into the crack - the rod worked fine when I was done. I wasn't totally happy with this repair but it seems to be holding up OK
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2019
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  15. Rocky creek

    Rocky creek TDPRI Member

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    Thanks fo
    no just a large scratch
     
  16. Rocky creek

    Rocky creek TDPRI Member

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    Thanks for all the help guys.
     
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