Look At This Ugly, Adorable Thing

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by samsterdam, Jul 12, 2013.

  1. samsterdam

    samsterdam TDPRI Member

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    First, I want to thank this community for all of it's help. I have learned so much about refinishing my tele!

    So, I have run into problem after problem with this project, but all of them, I can manage to live with (for example, I wanted a nice, mellow blonde tele, but it mixed something strange with the laquer and it become a more pronounced blonde. I still like it though, so, all's well).

    My problem here is the strange shiny spots you see. They seem very random and possibly underneath the surface (?) My fear is that I'll sand to try to get rid of them and then accidentally completely sand through the laquer!

    Also, in the second picture you can see a furrow towards the bottom (a little thread made its home in my guitar) - is there any way too make it less noticeable?

    So, I have two questions: (Aside from what I already know from Reranch 101)

    1. How do I go about sanding/polishing/finishing this?

    2. What do I do with the furrow?


    Ahh, help would much be appreciated!
     

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  2. Barfly

    Barfly Tele-Meister

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    Looks to me that the body didn't get filled and sealed.Shiney spots=the areas where the grain was tight and the paint filled it,dull rough areas=spots where the grain was open
     
  3. halfmassive

    halfmassive Tele-Meister

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    If the shinny spots are grain, etc. that didnt get filled you can shoot some more clear to kind of grain fill what's there and then sand it level and polish (after it cures).
     
  4. samsterdam

    samsterdam TDPRI Member

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    Ah, thank you both so much for your replies!

    I followed the spray rules of three for the laquer. Should I repeat that process? Then sand and polish?
     
  5. bullfrogblues

    bullfrogblues Friend of Leo's

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    What kind of wood is the body made of?
    As said previously, it doesn't look like you grain filled and have a lot of open grain and pores. If that's the look you want, fine. But if you want a completely smooth finish, you may have to start over. Whatever is shiny is what is too low in the finish to sand. So that part somehow needs to come up to the same level as the other parts of the body. Which is better than sanding the other parts down to the low spots. Then you will have to start over!
     
  6. tvvoodoo

    tvvoodoo Tele-Afflicted

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    Looks like you could use some drop filling in some spots too- if perfection is what you are going for. If you don't mind a thick finish, you could probably keep going with the lacquer after drop filling. but you will need to do rough levels say every four or five coats until you get to fifteen. This is from my experience on a similar project.
     
  7. samsterdam

    samsterdam TDPRI Member

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    Thank you all for your replies! This project is making me feel so defeated, but you're advice is so helpful!

    The wood is ash.

    By "start over" do you mean strip this finish and completely start over? Or do you mean that I do the Spraying Rules of Three over again?

    What do I need to "drop fill"?

    It was recommended to me that I wet-sand with 400 grit until the shiny spots are gone and then repeat the Rules of Three for the clear finish. Is this solid advice?
     
  8. bullfrogblues

    bullfrogblues Friend of Leo's

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    I don't know what the 'rules of 3' are, but I would think if you wet-sand with 400 grit until the shiny spots are gone, you'll be back to bare wood anyway. If it were mine, I would use a power sander and take it all back, seal it and fill the pores/grain, and start the finishing process over.
     
  9. samsterdam

    samsterdam TDPRI Member

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    ahh, that isn't exciting news, but I'm grateful for your advice!

    I'll post pictures when it's finished ... might be a while though. this project has really got me discouraged.
     
  10. ezas

    ezas TDPRI Member

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    Don't get discouraged. An expert is someone who has made all the mistakes. My first body was re-done 3 times. Including one full chemical stripping of the body (including dropping it on concrete while stripping).
     
  11. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    +1

    My first two bodies......1) a blonde strat. Lots of issues.....took several attempts to finish, and it's not without it's flaws. Took me a good six months to complete. But I absolutely adore it now it's finished. It's my favourite guitar to play. http://www.strat-talk.com/forum/diy-strat-forum/150265-strat-talk-made-me-do-60s-strat-build.html - if you want to read about all the mistakes I made. 2) a honeyburst tele. I have been going at this for nearly a YEAR!! I have yet to get the finish right, I have sanded back to bare wood and started over AT LEAST five times.

    Sometimes I get frustrated, and that's usually when more mistakes occur, so I try to leave it for another day when I am frustrated. I just see it all as part of the learning process. As great as TDPRI is for learning, doing it all in practice without an expert looking over your shoulder, well, that's always going to be lots of trial and error. I just try to remember to not make the same mistake twice..........

    Also, I sort of like the problems and mistakes, as that keeps the build going. There probably is some finite limit on how many guitars I can make for myself, so the longer each build takes, the longer I get to keep enjoying the hobby!
     
  12. joeford

    joeford Friend of Leo's

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    lightly sand the whole thing down, then spray some more clear on it. the shiney spots won't be so noticeable if the whole thing is shiney

    i love all the positive advice on this thread! stuff like this is what makes keeps me coming back to this site...
     
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