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Long Throw and Short throw?

Discussion in 'B-Bender Forum' started by Superc_1, May 13, 2011.

  1. Superc_1

    Superc_1 Tele-Meister

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    I know what a Long vs short throw is when it comes to my body parts :), but could someone explain or show the machanics of the difference and how to may this happen when I build my DIY bender? Thanks in advance.

    Better yet anybody got any detailed drawing that are alittle more indepth than a sketch?
     
  2. gumbo

    gumbo Tele-Meister

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    Hmm...must be my night for replying to things...:eek:


    There doesn't seem to be a great rush of effort back on this one, so I thought I'd jump in after a few days and not let the OP feel we're ignoring him...


    Basically, my answer is that (my understanding of things - AND let's note here that I DON'T own one!) simply the "throw length" refers to the amount of movement that has to take place of the lever attached to the strap button versus achieving a specified amount of pitch raise...

    "short throw" means you don't have to heave down as far on the neck to get the same amount of 'bend' on the string - conversely, "long throw" means you have to move the neck further, but the corresponding bend is achieved more slowly (or gradually, if you like!)

    Short vs Long is really then a matter of choice for the player, in a balance of effort (pressure down on the neck against the force of the return spring) and control (the speed with which one can ultimately achieve the 'bend' - and the corresponding way that effect may enhance or otherwise affect the player's style of playing)...

    From what I hear around here, the camp is divided somewhat as to what individuals prefer....:rolleyes:

    In any case (and for most bender mechanisms) the difference is simply achieved by altering the linkage attachment points within the setup..in other words, shortening or lengthening the distance between the attachment point and the fulcrum point of one or more levers.....some bender mechanisms have 'options' built into their design where this type of adjustment is easy and user-friendly....some others not quite so friendly..:cry:

    Here's hoping someone with more knowledge than me will now chime in and tell you what they reckon is the best option for you....from what I have read here in the past on the subject, I would think it would be preferable for you to get to try out both types, and ultimately decide what suits you, you playing style, and the sort of music you want to make..

    If you are able to invest in a system that allows you to infinitely adjust this aspect :idea: , you get the best of both worlds and can figure out what is best for you as you get into it...


    HTH

    Cheers,
    Gumbo

    (off to bed now, Folks!)
     
  3. telex76

    telex76 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    gumbo is pretty much right. Some benders come short throw, or medium, or long throw. Some benders can be adjusted to get any of the 3 throws.
    Different players like different throws. Some think short throw is faster, some think long throw is more musical. Many players don't agree with either of those statements.
     
  4. asatfan

    asatfan Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Very nice explanation, Gumbo!

    My Evans Pull String is variable. I prefer something in between the long and short, so mine is set in somewhere in the middle. As everything else around here, personal preference is key.
     
  5. mojotele65

    mojotele65 Tele-Meister

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    when I had Forrest build mine, he put it simply, think Long throw - Marty Stuart/ Clarence....Short Throw - Brad Paisley. I have long throw,but it can be changed to short.
     
  6. Chet Johnson

    Chet Johnson Tele-Afflicted

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    I've had a short throw, and a medium throw Parsons style. I Liked the short throw much more.
     
  7. BrianF

    BrianF Friend of Leo's

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    it all depends on what kind of music you play...modern Nashville chicken pickin ...go with the short throw....Slower more traditional country rock....long or medium throw. Its actually more than just the differnce in the mechanical distance...Because of this the short throw is much more of an on-off affair with less time spent in the actual bend. It The long throw can more expressive because of this...You can have more control during the bend...Again it is a preference...but there are musical differences. Despite these tendencies someone with alot of skill, practice and control can just about play any bender lick regardless of the throw though...
     
  8. Chet Johnson

    Chet Johnson Tele-Afflicted

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    I agree. I played a short throw as my main guitar for 13 years, some saucy slow steel guitar whining, some on-off chicken pickin licks.

    I could do the same with the medium throw, but it felt awkward for the fast stuff.

    I prefer short just for ease of a shorter triggering.
     
  9. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    Long throw benders are not exclusively used for "slow" bends, nor are short-throw benders *only* for "on-off" switch bends either. It's more a player-influence thing than strictly style oriented.

    If you follow players like Brent Mason and other Nashville guys the tendency is to gravitate to the short-throw benders since that's what *they* use; if you are more strongly influenced by the west-coast 70's (and onward) country rock that grew from the *original* bender played by Clarence White you may find a long-throw more to your liking.

    Caveat - "long throw" and "short throw" are extremely arbitrary "definitions". Clarence's original and the first modded Parsons-White "long throw" developed by Mike Nihen have a 1 1/4" pull; a stock Parsons White, OTOH, has a 5/8" pull. At first glance the 1 1/4" type appears ridiculously long but it's surprisingly easy to adapt to - and not "slow" at all.

    PW's, Parsons-Green, Glasers, Sheltons and most other production units seem to operate in the 5/8" territory. Gene Parsons had to come up with a long-throw to try to prevent loss of customers to installers who started taking Bill Bores bender parts and converting them to long throw, cutting him out completely.

    But what Gene makes isn't really a long throw - it's more of a compromise, with around a 3/4"pull.

    Dave Eveans initially solved the preference issue (since players were locked into one or the other - but not both) by developing a mechanism that provides approximately 9 different throw lengths between 5/8" and 1 1/4" and adding adjustable spring tension to the mix.

    Others have taken those variables and adapted them to their own or other designs - but of the ones I've played the Evans provides the smoothest, most linear (consistent tension) pull at either end of the spectrum and all points in between (plus it only takes about 5 minutes to change the throw.).

    Hope that adds a little more detail.
     
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