Long Exposures

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Bones, Jan 19, 2014.

  1. stevieboy

    stevieboy Poster Extraordinaire

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    Then you'd need a really long exposure!
     
  2. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    #1 looks like stone penguins coming ashore out of the surf..... ;)

    I like B&W pics... I wonder if that's because we saw a lot of B&W TV as kids?...
     
  3. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    They are all great pix. No 1 would be superb if totally monochrome. Somehow B&W looks more authentic and real to me. Great Stuff Sean!

    DC
     
  4. KevinB

    KevinB Doctor of Teleocity

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    Bones, there is a guy I occasionally "talk to" on a photography forum named Ian Bramham. He's from the same town in England as I am and he specializes in long exposure photography. He - fairly successfully - sells prints of his work.

    Here's the sort of stuff Ian does...

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Check out his on-line gallery.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2014
  5. Mjark

    Mjark Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    The one with the rocks and active sky is the best. Last one is nice too.
     
  6. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I think anyone can "learn" to do something, maybe most anything passably well. But it simply can't be denied some are "born" with talent and if they "learn" too, they produce results far beyond those of us who have merely "learned."
     
  7. greggorypeccary

    greggorypeccary Friend of Leo's

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    Sure it can be denied. Look into the literature, the concept of "natural talent" doesn't stand up to scientific scrutiny. Look behind anyone who's great at something and you'll find that they worked their ass off. Being born at the right time, right place, and under the right circumstances doesn't hurt either.

    But, I guess some folks need to believe that others are somehow born with magical powers.
     
  8. Bones

    Bones Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Well, I do think that people in the arts may have in edge in that they see/hear/perceive things in a different way. The technical aspect of translating that into something that other people can appreciate and understand can certainly be learned. But if you look at a bunch of old pilings in the surf and all you see are old pilings in the surf, all of your photos are going to look like old pilings in the surf and that's all people are going to see.

    I posted these photos on my Facebook and on the photography forum that I and a member of and the response as here has been very encouraging.

    I used to do a lot more abstract and street photography and one day I just took pictures of things I saw when walking my dog and some of the best responses that I got were for a rusty nail sticking out of an old piece of wood. People went nuts for it because the "art" of it was in the way of looking at an old rusty nail in an old piece of wood that most people would not have considered. I think in that way, some people have a gift. Maybe I'm one of those people, maybe I am not. I don't think it's for me to say, but I do know that all of my photography gear has been paid for by my more "quirky" pieces that are interesting to other people besides myself.
     
  9. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I couldn't possibly disagree more. If you believe that ANYONE can work hard and learn to create drawn art to the degree of the greats, to think that ANYONE can study music theory, immerse themselves in music and produce musical masterpieces, to think that ANYONE can study photography and learn to view and compose a three dimensional object and project that onto a two dimensional media in the way Bones has....then you are in denial of some really basic genetic transfer.

    I do not have it. It doesn't bother me that I don't. I still work hard to take pleasing images. Bones does have it and it isn't magic in any way. It's a genetic wiring in the brain. A gift if you will.
     
  10. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have a few miniature watercolors here that defy explanation .
    You just can't learn this , it has to be a part of you .
    I can't do it , but I sure can appreciate it .
     
  11. ce24

    ce24 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Very nice I actually thought the first picture was in the Arctic. I spent 10 years up there. I didn't realize it was the ocean until about the fourth or fifth picture.
     
  12. telleutelleme

    telleutelleme Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I particularly like #2. I think a good B&W trumps a color shot for many subjects.

    Enjoy your work. Put that one in a frame throw it up on flea-bay and post the link. I'll run it up.
     
  13. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Me too! As good as anything I've ever seen...:lol:
     
  14. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    HDR can produce different effects depending on how its post processed.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Bones

    Bones Telefied Ad Free Member

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    My personal feelings about HDR is that it is an abomination 99% of the time . Obviously, not everyone feels the same way. The last picture in the set above, looks good to me.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2014
  16. ThreePlyGuy

    ThreePlyGuy Friend of Leo's

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    I enjoy your photos Sean, as for HDR, it doesn't bother me though it often has a signature. BTW Astrophotographers make use of long exposures all the time.
     

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  17. Bones

    Bones Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I use Sony a77s, I have two of them. My next camera will be full frame. Any yes, if I have posted any videos recently, they were shot with the a77.
     
  18. Bones

    Bones Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I like these, but to be honest, I do not spend much time looking at other people's artistic photography, because I don't want to get any ideas that way. I do look at technical photography, like birds and wildlife to study the techniques used, but for street and artsy stuff, I tend to keep to myself.
     
  19. w3stie

    w3stie Poster Extraordinaire

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    Good for you Bones. I remembered this quote from Ralph Waldo Emerson;

    A man should learn to detect and watch that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages. Yet he dismisses without notice his thought, because it is his. In every work of genius we recognize our own rejected thoughts: they come back to us with a certain alienated majesty. Great works of art have no more affecting lesson for us than this. They teach us to abide by our spontaneous impression with good-humored inflexibility then most when the whole cry of voices is on the other side. Else, to-morrow a stranger will say with masterly good sense precisely what we have thought and felt all the time, and we shall be forced to take with shame our own opinion from another.​
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2014
  20. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Very well said.

    Bones' has got a head start on others because he was born with a great eye. But he's still digging; he wasn't content to drift along - he keeps trying different things and he's got that curiosity and don't forget he's got patience.

    Patience with the medium, that is. Patience with people, maybe not. ;)

    Trouble with "sales" is, it messes up the artistic mindset imo. People that buy stuff have to be patronized and that's how we get Thomas Kinkade instead of more Picasso.
     
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