Lodge skillet

maxvintage

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So I have a 10.5 inch lodge skillet that's at least twenty years old and carefully maintained. Food just slides right out of it.

I just got a new 10.5 inch lodge skillet for a socially distanced meal we are cooking that will require two skillets. The new one is much rougher than the old one. But I seem to remember--it was a long time ago--the old one being rougher when it was new. I'm seasoning and re-seasoning the new one.

So the difference between the two--did the old one get more smooth with use? Or did Lodge start making rougher castings? I'm tempted to sand the new one down a bit. But I cooked an omelette in it this morning and it didn't stick at all, so don't fix it if it ain't broke
 

Tyuk

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Just got a new 12” myself and noticed the same thing compared to my Lodge pizza stone.
 

rghill

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Some people go all out to remove the factory coating, and seasoning the new pan. Search on youtube for stripping and seasoning cast iron pans.

I have two fairly new Lodge pans, and never had a problem. Just cook like you normally would, and it will break in and cook just fine.
 

maxvintage

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It'll be fine. What's on the menu is the question?


two souffle's are on the menu. I'm going fancy but it's a cheater's souffle: https://food52.com/recipes/82304-cheese-souffle-recipe. No separating eggs. Looks fantastic bubbling and puffy in a cast iron pan. I might grille some sausages as well. Nice salad.; Two families, each gets it's own piping hot souffle.

I love the old lodge pans--I also have a small round griddle that's perfect for a lot of things. Cast iron is great nd I'm not sure why people need non-stick cookware.

As far as as seasoning I've read many recipe for seasoning, thing that works for me is cook with it, rinse it with water or scrub as needed, then dry it on the stove, putting a little film of oil on after it's hot.
 

Texicaster

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It Varies.....
New ones have a pebbly surface and are not as non stick as an old seasoned one.

I had one and while ok it never approached a vintage one.

I recently bought a DeBuyer steel pan that is great! Lodge makes steel pans too and I had one that was better than the cast iron but had a ridiculously long handle so passed it on. probably great for campfires.
 

StevesBoogie

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I'm about to pull the trigger on a Lodge skillet from our local Crate & Barrel ... but question for the group ... after cooking, and cleaning it, do you season both the inside AND outside of your skillet? Or is only the inside (the coooking area) needed for seasoning? Thanks in advance.
 

Jim_in_PA

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So the difference between the two--did the old one get more smooth with use? Or did Lodge start making rougher castings? I'm tempted to sand the new one down a bit. But I cooked an omelette in it this morning and it didn't stick at all, so don't fix it if it ain't broke

The act of seasoning cast iron (which is a continual process over time) puts a "varnish" on the surface made from the various oils that see the surface of the pan. That seasoning does build slightly over time and would mitigate the "just cast" roughness on the pan's surface. It is certainly possible that the older pan was smoother when new....manufacturing processes evolve over time.

As an aside, while I do have a few "plain" cast iron pans I use, I've mostly migrated to enameled cast iron (Staub in my case) which can be cleaned conventionally while the regular cast iron and the one carbon steel pan I have can't have soap. I also use acid, like lemon or other things frequently when cooking and that tends to strip off the seasoning, especially on the carbon steel. So with the enameled cast iron, I get the wonderful heat retention and cooking properties of cast iron without having to worry about my ingredients affecting the pan surface. I mostly use the regular cast iron only for veggies and only when not using acidic ingredients.

I guess it's clear that I seem to collect pots and pans like some folks collect Telecasters... :)

y4mTV-V_3yVgshMCw1JuCm3dsvLagrIWXaF7Cjbb-awXlCXFtaBTADuDP1_o5T_zITSB-jKEkps3OE0SqwUj9_UysWh7ArvYm0F3ZZSc7dNOWBxiRLJ6VuQQoD8JwyhHxpnY8MbB9XFrevmPxFc8QE2sRO7paWSeJXLvuYnrk6TqdT9BhbWzOOmBUjQm1xGj-3p
 

maxvintage

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Nice! I have a couple all-clad items but I think they're overrated. If i make something acidic I use a stainless revere wear pan that's ancient.


Never tried the enameled iron. Hmm
 

scooteraz

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I’ve had the Lodge, and it does seem the new castings are just a bit rougher than I remember from before. But, I don/‘t have a 25 year old unused pan to prove the point, so it may just be my memory.

I agree with @Jim_in_PA that the Staub pans are great. I have one of their grilling skillets with the meat press. I have put both in the oven at 450 Deg F, then added a steak or lamb chop or pork chops and they came out great, and the pan was a mess, but cleaned up nicely without a lot of seasoning like the Lodge.

Their regular skillets are nice too.
 

maxvintage

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I'm about to pull the trigger on a Lodge skillet from our local Crate & Barrel ... but question for the group ... after cooking, and cleaning it, do you season both the inside AND outside of your skillet? Or is only the inside (the coooking area) needed for seasoning? Thanks in advance.


I just do the inside
 

stxrus

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My great grandmother’s cast skillet iron that has only had cornbread made in it is at least 125 years old. Allegedly it has never been washed. I know since I’ve owned it and now that my sister has it it’s never been washed. It’s as smooth as a babies butt and the only time I’ve known anything to stick was a cornbread I screwed up and let burn. Scraped it out as best I could and put the skillet in a 500* oven for 15-20 minutes and wiped it clean. No harm, no foul.
 

W.L.Weller

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Regular dish soap doesn't hurt the seasoning. Lye will, but people haven't made their own soap at home using lye in quite a while now.

If you ever need to completely clean and re-season a pan, lye will help you get the pan back to bare metal.

I season the whole pan to increase the corrosion resistance. If you live in the desert, this is probably less of a concern.
 

dreamingtele

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I have a Lodge deep cooker which has a lid that turns into a frying pan as well.. I seasoned it, but I never cook in it all the time due to fear of stripping the season. LOL and yes it also came with a bit rough exterior..

I did roast a chicken once in it, and it was great! LOL


The act of seasoning cast iron (which is a continual process over time) puts a "varnish" on the surface made from the various oils that see the surface of the pan. That seasoning does build slightly over time and would mitigate the "just cast" roughness on the pan's surface. It is certainly possible that the older pan was smoother when new....manufacturing processes evolve over time.

As an aside, while I do have a few "plain" cast iron pans I use, I've mostly migrated to enameled cast iron (Staub in my case) which can be cleaned conventionally while the regular cast iron and the one carbon steel pan I have can't have soap. I also use acid, like lemon or other things frequently when cooking and that tends to strip off the seasoning, especially on the carbon steel. So with the enameled cast iron, I get the wonderful heat retention and cooking properties of cast iron without having to worry about my ingredients affecting the pan surface. I mostly use the regular cast iron only for veggies and only when not using acidic ingredients.

I guess it's clear that I seem to collect pots and pans like some folks collect Telecasters... :)

y4mTV-V_3yVgshMCw1JuCm3dsvLagrIWXaF7Cjbb-awXlCXFtaBTADuDP1_o5T_zITSB-jKEkps3OE0SqwUj9_UysWh7ArvYm0F3ZZSc7dNOWBxiRLJ6VuQQoD8JwyhHxpnY8MbB9XFrevmPxFc8QE2sRO7paWSeJXLvuYnrk6TqdT9BhbWzOOmBUjQm1xGj-3p

I’ve had the Lodge, and it does seem the new castings are just a bit rougher than I remember from before. But, I don/‘t have a 25 year old unused pan to prove the point, so it may just be my memory.

I agree with @Jim_in_PA that the Staub pans are great. I have one of their grilling skillets with the meat press. I have put both in the oven at 450 Deg F, then added a steak or lamb chop or pork chops and they came out great, and the pan was a mess, but cleaned up nicely without a lot of seasoning like the Lodge.

Their regular skillets are nice too.

How are the Staub ones? do you wash them like regular pans, kind of clean it with foam and maybe scrub it gently for those stubborn sticky residues and it will be fine??
 

SuprHtr

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Lodge makes them rougher (no machining post cast) for economical reasons and to make seasoning stick better. I found that old cast iron frying pans are thinner, lighter, and much smoother. I have one of the giant Lodge skillets and it annoys me. Griswold and Wagner are vintage brands that are well worth restoring if you can find them. Junk shops are a good source.

I have a method for seasoning that is the very best. I found it on someone's website/blog more than a decade ago and I swear by it. It needs a separate thread but I'll try to get back to it soon. Every other youtube method I've seen is garbage. Seriously. The woman from who's website I got the method is a chemical engineer living in an apartment in Manhattan and she has figured it out. I've benefited from my own background in knowing that sticking a cast iron skillet in an oven and setting it to self-clean will not harm the skillet.
 

maxvintage

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My wife is rolling her eyes at my seasoning methods. I've tried flaxseed oil in the oven but I find olive oil of the stovetop works well for me.
 




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