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Live: how do you amplify your acoustic?

Discussion in 'Acoustic Heaven' started by DaphneBlue, Dec 30, 2017.

  1. DaphneBlue

    DaphneBlue Tele-Holic

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  2. bottlenecker

    bottlenecker Friend of Leo's

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    At louder venues, if the sound guy doesn't mute it before I set it down, or if it's in my own monitor, it can feed back. Other than that, no. Other band members can have it in their monitors, and I can usually hear it ok from the guitar and bleed from the mains. My monitor could have a little, since it's a cardioid pattern mic, but none is safest.
     
  3. ac15

    ac15 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Several years ago, I installed one of the most highly touted pickup systems (Trance Audio Amulet system) into my Martin CEO-4 dreadnought.

    I decided I wanted to blend the Amulet with the Baggs M1, so I then installed an extra jack, and now have two end pin jacks on the guitar.

    It sounds great. But I realize that for applications where people would usually use an amplified acoustic, I usually prefer using a hollow body electric instead.

    So now I have this great guitar that I don't use, but has been altered to the point where I probably would have a hard time finding someone to buy it.

    So if you wanna buy my Martin, man, your setup will be smokin'!
     
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  4. DaphneBlue

    DaphneBlue Tele-Holic

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    I'm interested in your hollow body set up. How do you make it?

    I did that with my gretsch clipper and an hot rod deluxe but for strumming sections it was always a bit tricky.
     
  5. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I don't play out, but I do like to have the option to fill the room with sound, playing at home. My OM28V has a K&K Trinity, with outboard preamp/mixer, playing through a Fishman Loudbox Mini. The Pure Mini portion - the bridge plate sensors - sound fine on their own, but not quite like the unplugged guitar, to my ears. But blend in the gooseneck mic, and yeah, it sounds quite natural.

    I can see how the mic would be impractical for live playing, because of the feedback. It's not like the Lyric, where it's buried deep in the soundhole. This one is designed to sit 3/8" below the B string.

    Now that I have another nice Martin, and I'm not a big fan of putting crap into my guitars, I'm probably just gonna mic it in the room.
     
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  6. ac15

    ac15 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Good question. For starters, for solo gigs I tend to set my hollows for a warm sound, probably what most would consider a “jazz” tone. I use the neck pickup. Most of what I do is fingerstyle, but when there is strumming I use a feather light touch on the strumming hand to avoid a harsh tone.

    Not sure though if that’s what you mean by strumming parts being “challenging.”

    If you’re playing anything other than a full hollow, then you get a little less of the “acoustic guitar” response, so it can be harder in that regard.
     
  7. DaphneBlue

    DaphneBlue Tele-Holic

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    Yeah that's what I meant ;) thanks for the reply!
     
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  8. ac15

    ac15 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    I have a Marin o16ny from the 60’s and I have decided to not put anything in it either. My solution is to use a removable magnetic pickup.

    Putting a mic on an acoustic is indeed a nice sounding solution, as long as you are playing where people are quiet and listening to you.

    If you play in a noisy bar with that setup, you’re screwed.
     
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  9. NJ Deadhead

    NJ Deadhead Tele-Holic

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    2002 Taylor 314ce (older model from before the "expression" system) run straight into the PA. Sounds fine...I much prefer a mic'd up acoustic guitar but I usually play ****ty bars and this setup is easiest for that.
     
  10. Bob M

    Bob M Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I had to play an acoustic at church recently. I generally don't play acoustic and the only acoustic I have that is amplified is an Ovation Celebrity classical guitar-kind of a Willie Nelson vibe. I ran it through my small bass amp (Ampeg BA 115v2) with an EQ pedal, a little reverb and delay and it sounded great. Round, full sound, like I'd been doing it all along.
     
  11. theleman

    theleman Tele-Meister

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    By strumming harder ...
     
  12. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    So, my wonderful wife asked me what I wanted for my birthday... Why, the Red-Eye of course! And, I'll tell you, it sounds really good. It's a perfect match with the K&K and JJB pickups. It's simple. Battery or phantom power operated. The Boost feature works nicely (at most a little more finger noise on the strings and a touch more soundboard noise, but nothing unmanageable). But, the most important part is that it really sounds damn close to the un-amplified sound of my guitars! I am super stoked for this combo and cannot wait until I can use them live!
     
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  13. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

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    Microphone pointed at the sound hole of the guitar.
     
  14. Ooba Tooba

    Ooba Tooba Tele-Meister

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    F2B3947A-D651-4219-BE9C-8488E801D443.jpeg
     
  15. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I must be missing a piece of the puzzle. Is your DI connected to an amplifier onstage as well as the house PA? That's the situation that a ground lift is meant for so you're not connected to two grounds (the onstage amp and the PA) that might be on different electrical circuits. Ground-loop hum happens when there's different potential on the two different grounds (in other words they're sometimes not perfectly neutral). When you activate the ground lift, you're disconnecting the ground on the XLR cable going to the PA. You still have a send/return on the other two wires, and the mic cable to the PA is still shielded because it's connected to ground at the other end. But your DI and guitar won't be connected to the PA's ground. In that situation you need some other path to ground such as an onstage amp, via the phone jack output on the DI.

    However, as far as I know, if you don't already have the rig connected to something else that's grounded and you're only going to the PA, if you use the ground lift switch on the DI you've just disconnected your shielding in the guitar cable as well as inside the guitar wiring and everything becomes a nice antenna. Sometimes I've seen guitar players hear hum and think, oh, the answer must be the ground-lift switch, and in fact the hum gets worse for lack of shielding on the guitar.

    And while we're at it, before plugging your amplifier into an outlet in a new place, do you use a plug-tester to make sure (1) there is in fact a ground on that three-prong receptacle and (2) the polarity isn't reversed? (the latter is just a sign that the wiring wasn't done carefully and shouldn't be an issue with a modern amplifier so long as there's a ground, I wouldn't try to change a lightbulb on a lamp plugged into an outlet with hot and neutral reversed, however).
     
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  16. Jethro

    Jethro Tele-Afflicted

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    I use the Baggs "Lyric" in my D28. It's quite good, but it really does require some tuning in time with a DI. Once you get it tuned in it can sound very authentically acoustic, but without a DI it tends to sound somewhat hollow or enemic

    My main go-to acoustic is my Gibson J 185 that came equipped with the Fishman "Ellipse Aura". It's basically an under saddle piezo that also has 4 pre programmed images. There's a blender slider that lets you control how much pickup or image you want. As far as ease of use and quick setup this is by far the best thing I've come across, and it really sounds excellent even without a DI. I've used it through many different PA systems and it is very quick and easy to get an honest acoustic tone. I've had many complements on it's tone....it's definitely taken me by surprise at how good it is
     
  17. DaphneBlue

    DaphneBlue Tele-Holic

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    Thanks for your precise answer!

    Well I usually play this way: lr baggs m1 passive > lr baggs para di > sound engineer's PA

    There's always a pro sound engineer as I play clubs and festivals. Some of them cut the hum by finding the ****ty frequency and others prefer to get rid of my para di to plug my guitar in an active di and use ground lift.

    I prefer when they kill the ****ty frequency. It's more efficient.

    I'd like to add that this ****ty frequency is not created by my mic. It is the result of my single coil exposed to a precs type of light systems and lame electrical systems. See what I mean?
     
  18. LP26

    LP26 Tele-Meister

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    I have a Gibson J-45 Vintage and a Martin 000-18GE. Both have Baggs Anthem pickups installed.

    I plug straight in to a Henriksen Bud amplifier.
    The Bud works equally well with acoustics or my hollow body Gibsons.
    Hell, it works like a charm with my Telecasters and plays very well with pedals - perhaps excluding real heavy distortion boxes though I've had success with a Fulltone OCD, a Wampler Clarksdale or my personal favorite, the wampler Tumnus.

    At 9" x 9" x 9" and 18 pounds it's also a great grab and go amp, particularly if traveling by cab or subway.
     
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  19. Old Tele man

    Old Tele man Friend of Leo's

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    DeArmond 240 "in-sound hole" pickup:

    [​IMG]
     
  20. bettyseldest

    bettyseldest Friend of Leo's

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    The uke has an under saddle piezo along with a Belcat preamp, it is a uke so it is supposed to sound nasal. It is never used on a loud stage so I don't need it monitored. I either run it direct into the PA, or if I'm just accompanying un-amplified singers I might use a Behringer B205D.

    upload_2018-1-25_21-11-19.jpeg

    I picked up the Clearwater Bohemian a couple of years ago for £60 used in as new condition, it gets used for open mic's and anywhere else I am reluctant to take the Yamaha. Again it has an under saddle piezo which is run direct into the PA, there is no pre-amp so I may need someone to address that issue at the mixer. It has three soundholes, two upward facing, which avoids the need for monitoring.

    upload_2018-1-25_21-11-54.jpeg

    The Yamaha LL11E has both under saddle piezo and internal mic. A stero lead connects to the external pre-amp where the two signals can be blended. I usually run it into the PA. The first time I used it in a band situation I struggled with feedback, since then I have used a side fill monitor rather than wedge. For small solo gigs I have run both the Yamaha and my vocal mic into one or two of the Behringer B205Ds.

    upload_2018-1-25_21-12-20.jpeg
     
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