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Let's talk about once "Cutting edge" musical technology which _has_ stood the test of time.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Ed Driscoll, Apr 21, 2021.

  1. Ed Driscoll

    Ed Driscoll Tele-Afflicted

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    Might as well get the obvious ones out of the way first, given where we are:

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    The Gibson Les Paul:

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    The Marshall amp:

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    The Shure SM57 and SM58:

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    Neumann condenser mics from the '50s and '60s:

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    Universal LA-2A tube-based compressor and 1176 FET compressor from the 1960s:

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    The Eventide H3000 Harmonizer from the 1980s:

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    What would you add to the list?
     
  2. northernguitar

    northernguitar Friend of Leo's

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    Though the old fuzz pedal makers have long gone out of business, they still remain popular and sought after. They either get remade by the big guys, or are a popular choice from independent builders. Ditto the Rangemaster treble booster.
     
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  3. JamesAM

    JamesAM Tele-Meister

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    The 1/4” audio cable.

    imagine if every company had proprietary inputs and you had to have adapters for every one of them. Woof.
     
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  4. Leonardocoate

    Leonardocoate Tele-Meister

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    I will throw the Alesis SR16 drum machine into the hat...I'm not sure if it is the first but it's been around a long time and they keep making it and selling it
     
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  5. Ed Driscoll

    Ed Driscoll Tele-Afflicted

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    Yup! I guess JHS counts as an independent, with Boss/Roland being one of the big guys, but both offer modern reproductions of the germanium-based Tone Bender fuzz box:

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  6. Ed Driscoll

    Ed Driscoll Tele-Afflicted

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    And the XLR cable. The Recording the Beatles book talks about the Tuchel connectors that EMI Abbey Road used on their patch cables, before phasing them out in the early 1970s. I'll try to remember to take a photograph of one of those pages tonight.
     
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  7. notmyusualuserid

    notmyusualuserid Friend of Leo's

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    Telecommunications standard. Guitar manufacturers used them because they were cheap and readily available. ;)
     
  8. pixeljammer

    pixeljammer Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    Drums. Not much in the world of music technology that is older.
     
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  9. OlRedNeckHippy

    OlRedNeckHippy Friend of Leo's

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    Tortex!!
    No more broken picks. No more broken strings from catching a crack on a soon to be broken pick.

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  10. Censport

    Censport Tele-Holic

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    I'm still using my Ibanez UE-405, does that count?
     
  11. scooteraz

    scooteraz Friend of Leo's

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    Pipe organs?

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. dreamingtele

    dreamingtele Friend of Leo's

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    HAHAHAHAHAHAHA

    I use exactly the same pick!! these are soooo good! perfect texture, perfect thickness, can do mighty aggressive picking and subtle lovingly plucked strings/chords..
     
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  13. stxrus

    stxrus Poster Extraordinaire

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    The strobe tuner.
     
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  14. northernguitar

    northernguitar Friend of Leo's

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    I’d give JHS a ‘big guy’ pass. Those legends of fuzz pedals look dope. I was more thinking about small shops. There’s a builder in Hamilton, Ontario that makes just about every classic fuzz pedal and more. I bought his Rangemaster clone and it’s a hard pedal to turn off with a gritty amp.
     
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  15. Mandocaster68

    Mandocaster68 Tele-Meister

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    We are approaching 100th anniversary of Lloyd Loar's unveiling of the "new" Gibson F-5 mandolin. Loar was a virtuoso player hired by Gibson to be an acoustic engineer, and during his time with the company brought together a set of design elements that pretty much re-defined the mandolin.

    Some of those traits include:
    1: Elevating the fretboard off the face of the mandolin.
    2: Extending the scale length slightly to allow the neck to meet the body at the 12 fret.
    3: Making an adjustable, compensated bridge standard.
    4. Introducing F shaped sound holes and cross bracing the top giving a more focused sound.

    The Loar designed Gibson F5 model became the gold standard for American mandolin design and aesthetics from 1922 on. It remains one of the most sought after mandolin configuration nearly 100 years later.


    320px-1924_Lloyd_Loar_F-5_(SN75846),_Virzi_(SN10002)_(2010-09-18_00.27.59_by_Joseph_Brent)_clip1.jpg
     
  16. Mandocaster68

    Mandocaster68 Tele-Meister

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    How about geared tuning machines. CA 1825, credited to Johann Georg Stauffer, Austrian luthier. C.F. Martin was an apprentice to Stauffer, and after immigrating to the United States in 1833, started his own guitar company utilizing those newfangled tuning machines.
     
  17. 53Strat

    53Strat Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    How about the old paper coned speaker.

    Still going strong and not likely to be replaced as far as I can see.
     
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  18. VintageSG

    VintageSG Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    For production of music, the triode, the pentode and the beam tetrode.
    The humble transistor gets little love, but our current world couldn't function as it does without it. The MOSFET series gave us nice pre stages and whufty power amps. Mix a bunch of transistors and passives together and you get op-amps. These little workers feature everywhere. Mix different transistors and passives together and get an amp-onna-chip, such as the venerable TDA20x0 series. Amp-onna-chip packages drive/drove many a fine sounding amp, stereo, radio, car stereo, boombox, PA, television and more. They've also amplified some real guffers too, but implemented correctly, an amp-onna-chip is a miracle of the modern age.
    Class D PA systems and bass amps. True, a Class D driven into clipping is not nice, but as a clean lifter, they're hard to beat.
    Neodymium magnets for speakers, in-ear monitors and headphones. Coupled with tuned balanced armatures for head-sound.
    A basic, personal/small band PA no longer needs to weigh 50Kg for the amp, plus 20Kg for each speaker unit. A Class D power stage and Neo speakers means the whole shebang can weigh in at 25Kg for a system capable of filling a bar gig with loud, clear, pleasant sound. They've been around for a while now, they're still around. The older, Class AB behemoths are still available new, and are peanuts second hand, but why break your back?
    Clip-on tuners. A piezo, a frequency counter, a comparator and a display in a tiny, fairly accurate package for £2~3 upwards. Ugly they may be, useful they certainly are. One to suit every pocket.
    Fuzz. Fuzz will never die. Fuzz is life. All you need is fuzz. Fuzz is all you need.
     
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  19. Lawdawg

    Lawdawg Tele-Afflicted

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    Easy answer -- MIDI. It was developed almost 40 years ago by Dave Smith who is still going strong today with Sequential. The original MIDI protocol was so well thought out and robust that its successor -- MIDI 2.0 -- was not announced until January 2020!
     
  20. kplamann

    kplamann Tele-Holic

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    At the time, the Böhm key system for flutes was a major innovation.
    Also, the development of the clarinet and particularly later of the saxophone were bold technological innovations which hold up very well.
     
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