Let's make a neck!

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by guitarbuilder, Aug 2, 2017.

  1. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I use meshcam for my Gcode generation. Meshcam gets opened up like any other program and then you open the file you want. Normally I choose 3 axis machining but this time I wanted to try 2 sided machining. I wanted to try to register the neck a different way using four dowels in the corners.

    This is my part in the drawing.

    p2.JPG




    This is how meshcam shows it.


    p3.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2018
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  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Once you make that choice, you just click on each button and it'll ask you what you want to do. Next I click on the choice to make the top of the part zero.
    Then you hit OK to move to the next button. Some of these buttons don't get used.




    p4.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2018
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  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    This one establishes how high over the work you want the cutter to move without cutting when moving from point to point.

    p5.JPG
     
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  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You decide where you want the program 0,0. I always click on the "set to geometry zero" setting. This uses the 0,0 from the drawing, which in this case is 10 inches to the left of the centerline of the neck. x0,y0 will also be the home position on the cnc router.

    p6.JPG
     
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  5. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You decide how low the cut can go. The stock is 1" thick but I don't want to cut into the bed, so I make it a bit less. .020 less to be exact.



    p7.JPG
     
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  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You have to decide what region of the stock to machine. I take a draw a rectangle around the whole thing. It's the line in pink.





    p8.JPG


    p9.JPG
     
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  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The next step is to choose the bit and the specifics of the machining. I like to rough it out in both the x and y directions and do the final cut in just the Y direction because that is the direction of the grain. You decide the stepover and feed rates here, and how deep to machine during each pass. Your choices determine the quality of the finish and the time it takes to do the job. A smaller depth or stepover means more time but a cleaner result. It's a tradeoff. Here I'm using a .5 dia roundnose bit and choosing not to machine the top of the material. That will be the surface of the blank which will be prepped to final dimension before I cut it here.


    p10.JPG
     
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  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    This information is the graphic of the toolpath for each side of the neck.




    p11.JPG


    p12.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2018
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  9. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    And the other side Remember I selected 2 sided machining, so it produces two different g code files for the top and back of the part. If this all goes correctly, I left about 1/16" of wood in the middle to keep the neck in place. I'll have to flip the neck front to back after the first part is machined. It'll take about an hour to cut both parts of the neck according to the software estimation.


    p13.JPG
     
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  10. oldrebel

    oldrebel Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    Wow, this is great Marty!!
     
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  11. mojoatomic

    mojoatomic Tele-Holic

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    Thanks Marty, looks fairly straight forward and familiar. Have you decided how to do the alignment pins and zeroing?
     
  12. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I set the centerline of the neck at X10.0 just like the other necks I was working on. I used 1/4 dowel for the pins in the outer corners of the waste that are equidistant from the centerline. They worked out OK.

    I haven't done a pencil clean up yet, but I'll add that to the mix. I also see I have to increase my machining margin more to get it to rough out more around the heel. Zero is my home position so if there is a power failure or some screw up, I can just go back and rehome it and that's zero.

    I was generous with the area to machine but next time I'd add some keep out zones to confine the cut and spend less time machining. You live and learn. This was my first double sided machining experience.


    I should probably redo the meshcam file with a different neck orientation so the paddlehead is facing the front at the end of the job. That way I can do the drilling operation for the truss rod plug too. The skunk stripe slot would require redoing it since this neck is in a different spot.


    paddletop.jpg


    paddleback.jpg
     
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  13. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Here's the paddlehead after the machining, perimeter cut and hole " drilling".

    DSC06167.JPG


    DSC06166.JPG
     
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  14. ppg677

    ppg677 Tele-Meister

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    Just to clarify-- you're neck is 1" thick at the 14th fret and 0.85" thick at the 1st fret? Don't most necks these days have a taper that is relatively constant like shown in the NECK50SFINAL2D.DWG file I was recommended? The neck is 0.85" across the entire middle section.

    Which means I can't just use your facet method numbers AS IS!

    ZeMmOBnSWi7.png
     
  15. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    There is a straight taper between the transitions but it's not a constant thickness. That would make it feel different than I'm used to. See the taper line at page 22 post 430. The beauty of creating your own neck is you can design it any way you like. Fender necks generally are 1" thick at the heel. I personally don't want to feel abrupt transitions in the necks I play ( read as volutes), so things are placed the way I like them in these examples. I'm primarily a Gibson player so those necks impact my designing. You can see the carve machines out pretty smoothly along its length.


    The facet method can be used with a constant thickness too if that is what you are looking for. You'd just put the cross section drawings at the beginning and end of the constant thickness wherever they are along the neck. That's where the straight lines would be drawn and you'd carve your transitions in there after you do the primary facets.


    If you look at the other examples I did in the thread, you'll see I drew the cross sections at different fret positions in one or two of them. That's the beauty of this method of carving. You decide what you want and where you want it along the neck, as opposed to copying somebody else's numbers from what they do in their video, and ending up with their neck instead of what you may like. Try drawing what you prefer out and see what happens. If you are doing it in CAD it's just a few minutes work.

    This thread isn't about copying anybody's work line for line. Ed Hawley's neck, ( Thanks Ed!) which you picture above is his interpretation of his neck and I just used it as a point of departure for my necks. My nut width is 1-11/16" which changes things up right there. The general peghead shape and thickness, and heel transitions are my favorite parts of his drawing. The scale length is variable as is the fretboard radius, dot placement, and general shape of the neck carve.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2018
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