Let's make a Gibson style PAF humbucker

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by guitarbuilder, Jan 30, 2019.

  1. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    At this point you can pot it or not. I choose not. This is ready to go with it's counterpart into a guitar. I hope this demystifies the process somewhat.


    Thanks for watching!


    pair.jpg
     
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  2. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    Awesome Marty. I haven't wound full size humbuckers yet but I've wound Filtertrons which are smaller and the process was almost painful. I broke the start wire at least 10 times so I can relate to what you're saying.

    Thanks for sharing.
     
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  3. Barncaster

    Barncaster Doctor of Teleocity

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    When can we hear them?
     
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  4. OakhurstAxe

    OakhurstAxe TDPRI Member

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    Looks basically how I do it as well. I pretty much always use covers over them, always afraid they will get damaged otherwise, and I always pot them. If you pot them use mix of candle wax/bees wax (I think 70/30 is best?). Potting helps prevent vibration in the pickup from feedback from amp, so feedback is much less likely and not as loud.

    Remember 2 humbuckers is more work than 4 single coils, but its worth it.
     
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  5. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Thanks so much for posting this Marty - this will be invaluable when I get around to winding.

    Some steps were slightly different to the StewMac instructions that came with my kit - like where/when to solder your lead wires - but you’ve done a good job explaining why the method works best for you.

    Do you have to ground one of the leads to the baseplate? Or can that be omitted?

    Cheers!
     
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  6. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks, Marty. This is very informative.

    I do have a couple of questions:
    1) How would you create a split coil capability?
    2) Would flipping a coil achieve the Peter Green type out of phase sound?
     
  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Well you need a complete loop through both bobbins. The white ends are soldered together. One black goes to ground, and I guess soldering the other one to the inner hot wire of the braided pair is the easier way to connect it up. If you used 4 conductor wire, you'd have 4 wires going to the bobbin magnet wires, and a ground wire too, so that would be a total of 5 solder connections; Black, Green, red, white, and plain.


    See the chart here:

    https://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Onli...ctronics_and_Wiring/Humbucker_Pickup_Kit.html


    I used the stewmac directions along the way and they are good. I think they could have been written more clearly maybe with more sub-titles, as things are kind of jammed together in there. I'm not sure how you can do things differently other than put the slug bobbin in first.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2019
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  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I believe the Peter Green tone is achieved by putting the magnet in with the polarity reversed from what I did. I think I also did this when I messed up and reversed my hook up colors on the bobbins a couple of times. That was the impetus to make my pickup tester mule a couple weeks ago. The pickup was sounding out of phase with its neighbor when I installed it, but OK on its own.

    To split the coils, you need 3 or 4 wires attached to the bobbins. Tapping shorts out one hot wire to ground I believe. Splitting allows you to mess with both bobbins in series and parallel modes. I never liked the sound very much, so I never bothered.


    Those directions are in here Mark:

    https://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Onli...ctronics_and_Wiring/Humbucker_Pickup_Kit.html




    The slug buckers ( magnets instead of slugs and screws) I made early on have more of a Fender tone to them because of that.


    This is Version 1 and 2...kind of primitive. I've since done it with commercial bobbins too and they worked out well.


    bucker.jpg









    slug.jpg


    slugbuckers installed.jpg
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2019
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  9. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    Thank you, Marty. Since I do have a variable speed lathe, I may try my hand at it down the road. If you would please detail some info on your magnet counter setup. It appears pretty simple, and your results look repeatable.
     
  10. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    No problem Mark. I bought this after looking at the prices of the high quality red lion ones.

    http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5338148343&icep_item=142631003889


    I'm no electrical savant, so this seemed like it would work. :). I bought two of them in case one didn't work... You know MIC quality.....:).

    The switch comes with a magnet and the battery to run it. I had a couple neo magnets here that came out of a free HF flashlight ( one of the blue ones that stick to metal). I attached the plywood to the faceplate. I gave the plywood a coat of superglue and let that dry, then did an acetone wipe on the the faceplate itself. I glued that down to a square of plywood. I drew a circle and cut/sanded it to a round. I guess I could have turned it round but I can use a stationary belt sander pretty well. :).

    Then I drilled the hole for the magnet. I think they are metric, so I had a little space around it. I stuck some baking soda in there and added some superglue to really fill it in and adhere it.



    The switch comes with a bracket that fit right on the lathe. It couldn't have been easier to do this. It doesn't turn off, but I imagine one could get a switch incorporated in there too.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2019
  11. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Ah, I get it. Thanks!
     
  12. Maricopa

    Maricopa Friend of Leo's

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    Great thread and a great example of why you shouldn't gripe about the cost of these things!
     
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  13. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Yes, massive respect! Mind you, I started playing around with the idea of winding my own pickups because the cost of a decent set of Jaguar pickups needed for a current build in the UK is about £100 (non Fender) - which is pretty costly for me. The cost of building a winder and then winding them myself is going to come out less than that... it all centres on whether I can do a decent job of it though!
     
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  14. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Thanks. Just the cost of the individual parts make one of the kits from stewmac or mojotone worth a look too. If one can live with metric pole pieces and a brass base plate, then taking apart a MIC humbucker and rewinding it sure is cost effective.

    http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5338148343&icep_item=192508671364
     
  15. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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  16. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    That appears to be a 50mm span for a neck pickup. For another couple dollars on ebay one could get some 53 mm ones easy enough. I don't see a bridge kit on the site. The price is good though.


    On another note, I bought a batch of allparts bobbins and don't care much for them. I have been using the philly luthier ones.
     
  17. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Thanks Marty!
     
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  18. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    Here's the bridge kit Marty. 52mm
    https://www.tubesandmore.com/products/pickup-parts-set-humbucker-bridge
     
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  19. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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  20. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

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    If you end up trying them out please let us know what you think. I haven't wound mine yet - nor any humbuckers - so I don't know if they are good or not.
     
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