Let's do some 3d printing !

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by guitarbuilder, Apr 1, 2020.

  1. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    So I've been wanting a 3d printer for a while now but held off because who needs more plastic junk around? Got plenty of recyclables here I need to recycle....However, I do want some custom pickup bobbins, knobs, and maybe a couple little jigs, so maybe it would be useful. I like to learn new stuff too...so maybe I should do it.

    Anyway, I went to a local Makerfaire this past winter to actually see some in action. I talked to a number of Engineering students and they liked the Creality Ender Pro. Well a few weeks ago I took the plunge. While 2-300 dollars isn't chump change for me, it's nothing like what I've spent on my tools, machines, cnc routers, and guitars, so I hit the "buy" button on Amazon. It came a week or so ago. I let it sit around waiting for the right time to put it together.


    ender.png
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2020
  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Monday was the right time. In retrospect, I should have looked at the multitude of videos before I assembled it rather than after :). I did the assembly of parts about 80% of the way and got a headache from it. I put it away until yesterday and finished it up and homed it. Homing is making it move to a location where all 3 axes hit limit switches and stop.

    The one sheet of pictures that have no detail was challenging. Actually instead of real pictures I think they used the modeling part drawings.

    They could have used 2 sheets and made the pictures larger so you could actually see things.... Anyway after a couple hours and high blood pressure, it was together.
     
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  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Today I was going to do a test run. I drew a simple solid square (1 x 1 x .125" ) with a recessed circular feature in my CAD program. There is no point in wasting filament to make some giant thing that I don't want or need so I opted to keep it simple and small.

    Then I downloaded Cura, which is a free program for 3d printing, and watched a few videos on that. It's pretty easy when you have some cnc experience under your belt.

    I loaded some filament into the printer and went to level the bed. The bed has 4 springs under it and they don't have enough oomph to get the bed up to where it needs to be to print. So now I'm at a standstill. I took the springs out and tried to put a couple washers under it but it's a bit frustrating, so I quit for the day. I'm thinking of making some simple pickguard washers with a saw and a drill to raise the springs up about 1/8" and will order new and improved springs for it.
     
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  4. tdoty

    tdoty Tele-Meister

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    Things like that are why my CR10 (forerunner of the Ender) still hasn't run. My Monoprice Mini has a good number of miles on it though - I've had it for three years. When it gets unpacked from the move to TN, I need to put a new thermocouple on the hotend.

    Knobs, bobbins, jig & fixture parts, tool parts.......all kinds of uses for a 3D printer in the shop.

    I prefer Slic3r to Cura, personally. Cura has more features and I use it for those features, then save and open the files in Slic3r for final slicing. I find I have better results that way, but that's just me.

    Best of luck with it!
     
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  5. Preacher

    Preacher Friend of Leo's

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    My son bought a 3D printer a year or two ago and never got it to make anything other than the loaded elements. I need to dig it out and see what model it is and if you guys can give me some pointers.
     
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  6. raito

    raito Poster Extraordinaire

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    There's a CR-10 for $150 on CL locally.
     
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  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Thanks. I think I maybe making parts soon.



    Well I am not the guy to give 3d printing advise yet, but so far it seems to be a reasonable learning curve. If you can do CAD, then you are halfway there.
     
  8. Preacher

    Preacher Friend of Leo's

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    I think that may have been part of his problem. I have worked on CAD for the last thirty or so years, him not so much.
     
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  9. pj1440

    pj1440 TDPRI Member

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    I don' have that particular machine - but on mine you can adjust the zaxis limit switch with a screw.
    Can you not get it in the ballpark by moving the zaxis limit switch trigger position maybe, by a screw or by moving its position?

     
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  10. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Nope...I tried that..it's as low as it'll go.
     
  11. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    I have one and while I've considered making pickup bobbins, the prints will leave a lot of burrs that will snag the wire. Especially when you need supports for things. You might split the bobbin in half lengthwise and print both halves from the inside out and glue them together around your magnet rods.

    Do test prints at different layer heights or offsets so you know if you need a 6mm hole you must make it a half mm larger in the model so it comes out right when printed. Do these tests with specific small cubes/disks/etc rather than a huge part.

    Don't try to print tall skinny things like pencils standing up as they will unstick.

    Don't leave it unattended or you can easily have a big glob of spun plastic instead of a part.

    Cura works well for most projects.

    .
     
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  12. draggindakota

    draggindakota Tele-Meister

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    Watching this with interest. My buddy has an Ender 5 and has said he'd print me whatever. I've got some models for radius sanding blocks that I'm going to send over eventually.
     
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  13. Bowen

    Bowen TDPRI Member

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    I've been using my 3d printer for all sorts of guitar stuff. I make a lot of simple one use jigs, like one for tuner hole marking, trem wedge, temporary nut for setup, ect.

    I've published a couple of things, one is a scifi themed lap steel, the other is a set of radius guages. Both are on thingiverse.

    The lap steel is a wall hanger. I left plenty of room for internal supports but I got lazy and stuffed a couple of harbor freight rulers in there as truss rods. The whole thing is pretty bowed now, perhaps I'll fix it some day.

    My next project is to make a tele version of a Yamaha silent guitar. I'll be using a wood neck and body-stick, the tele shaped perimeter and all the needed templates will be 3d printed.

    1.jpg

    2.jpg
     
  14. tdoty

    tdoty Tele-Meister

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    I've split the bobbins and printed them that way. I use ABS for most everything, so acetone smooths things out pretty well. Haven't finished my winder, so I haven't tried winding on the printed bobbins yet.

    Calibrating the printer is an important step! I used to have access to a $65,000 EnvisionTec resin printer, and even that needed regular calibration to keep things sized properly.

    There's ways around that. I've printed an Xacto knife handle standing straight up......rafts work wonders sometimes!

    That works for small prints. I've had jobs over 30 hours on the Monoprice. I've also made plenty of bird's nests. It's rather disappointing to check on a print that's 18-24 hours in and see that everything is going fine...............then coming home from work to find it had been printing in air since about the last time it was checked on. 3D printing filament doesn't stick to air very well.

    Expect lots of failures. Especially when first starting, but I almost always expect the print to fail; hope for the best, prepare for the worst. Luckily, filament is pretty cheap. I've had good luck with 3DSolutech filament. Rocketan has worked well for me too. I quit ordering Filabot filament off Amazon when I got 2 rolls in a row marked as 1.75 on the box, but were actually 3mm. I usually get a 2.2lb spool of ABS or PLA for $16 or under.

    My printer has gotten to where it doesn't like anything but ABS. I haven't been able to figure that out. I can't get more than 2 layers with PLA or PET-G without clogging the tip. ABS prints fine 95+%of the time. That's ok, I like ABS. PLA and PET-G are supposed to be easier to print than ABS. I also use a 0.2mm nozzle, which might be part of the problem. That's a long winded suggestion to try different materials, lol.

    Learning CAD (or, more accurately, 3D Solid Modelling) is a big hurdle. 3D printing is easy. Designing parts for 3D printing is a bit more challenging. There's plenty on Thingiverse to keep a printer humming, but I like designing my own stuff.
     
  15. matmosphere

    matmosphere Tele-Afflicted

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    I have one of these and it’s great once you dial it in. I replaced the springs and did a couple other little upgrades, but I think the springs were the thing that helped the most. I’d say wait for them to arrive and see where your at once you get them on.

    I built mine using a great video from a place called tomb of the 3D printer or something.
     
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  16. matmosphere

    matmosphere Tele-Afflicted

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    Sorry Tomb of 3D Printed Horrors. It’s a great video and I believe he addresses the issue you are having.
     
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  17. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    So I made my washers and installed them. Then I leveled the bed and found out I had to remove ones at one corner because of the wire holding bracket. My neck is starting to ache from being in an awkward position, so I quit for a while. After a couple hours I went back and moved things around again. The problem here is when you adjust one corner it impacts the other corners, so its back and forth, back and forth, front to back. Finally I could see that the corners were close and I went in with my paper feeler guage. That was kind of successful. I homed the machine again. I tested and adjusted with the paper. Finally I decided to press "go". I'm not quite sure of what I'm doing yet, but it did finally start to print. After about 1.3 mm of height it became unstuck..... I aborted. I still look at this as half full. I have read and heard about using glue on the bed, so I guess I'll research that part and give it another try. I'm kind of pleased though with what is happening. The aborted attempt was to be 1 x 1 x .125 with a circular feature in it. That blob was when it was still working while it was loose and when I was trying to find out how to stop it. Lots of hidden menus to memorize...LOL. With my caliper it looks to be about 5.5-6 thou oversize on both sides.


    test plastic.jpg
     
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  18. matmosphere

    matmosphere Tele-Afflicted

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    Which print bed do you have? I had the bumpy magnetic one and it worked well. I know that people swear by the glass ones, but I think you need to usually use a glue stick with those to get stuff to stick

    It looks like something made a bump there (straight up from 1 and 20/32) that may have gotten caught on the nozzle and pulled the print off. Check to see if the eccentric nut on the part with the printhead is tightened well, it might be part of the issue.
     
  19. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

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    Fun stuff Marty. One way to keep busy while practicing social distancing.
     
  20. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    This is the newer one with the magnetic bed. After it came "unglued", it was just spinning around with glue coming out of the nozzle, which is what the blob is that you see. I'll probably redraw something and give it another try.
     
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