Les Paul Jr. Bridge

Discussion in 'Other Guitars, other instruments' started by Jim603, Apr 4, 2020.

  1. Jim603

    Jim603 Tele-Meister

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    Does anyone know how to buy one of these bridges? I'm having a hard time finding any information about them. The come on the current Les Paul Jr., they look like just a stopbar, with no lightning bolt. I played one in the store and they appear to be compensated. I think they look very cool, and the intonation is right on.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. kohoutec

    kohoutec Tele-Meister

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    The wraparound on the new Les Paul special (like your photo) isn't compensated, however mine isn't far off so I've not replaced it.
    If I did, I would be looking at the Mojoaxe wraparound, which I think is probably what you're looking for... They're not cheap though
     
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  3. drmmrr55

    drmmrr55 Tele-Holic

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    I was planning on changing the bridge on my 2020 Original collection LP Special, but it came from the factory pretty darn close, and after a pro setup, am very happy with the uncompensated bridge. It did say in the description that it was compensated, but it don't look compensated to me, unless the radius isn't straight across the bar...it's the same bridge that my 2012 Junior came with, I think the new Juniors (at least the tribute's), come with the "stairstep" compensation. You should be able to get one just about anywhere that sells guitar parts, of course if you get a genuine Gibson wraparound bridge, don't expect it to be cheap!
    Special bridge.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2020
  4. Fretting out

    Fretting out Friend of Leo's

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    That’s good to know I’m interested in these.
    The fret board looks like it’s on the drier side?
     
  5. dkmw

    dkmw Friend of Leo's

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    That looks a lot like my TonePros locker.

    27ABAFB3-A137-490C-B8DA-E977971A0358.jpeg
     
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  6. hdvades

    hdvades Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    That is so true. I have one of these new Specials and the rosewood was so dry and light it looked like pau ferro. Several applications of (D'Addario) Lemon Oil took care of that. Amazing difference and the rosewood darkened right up too.
    I'm happy with the intonation of the stock bridge also. Not bad at all for a wraparound.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2020
    Fretting out and dented like this.
  7. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    A non-compensated bridge of that sort cannot possibly intonate accurately. That is why Gibson began using the first ‘lightning’ compensated bridge in the ‘60s. That compensation was good for a wound G string. The modern ‘lightning’ bridge is compensated for a plain G string. with the bridge above mine can get the two E strings accurately intonation. The B will be a bit sharp, the D will be just a bit flat, and the A will be a bit sharp. but there are problems with the G....a Plain string will be a sharp and a wound string will be flat. This same result is to be found with the standard saddle that Martin and Gibson used for decades on their acoustics.
    Imho, there is no reason not to use a properly compensated bridge....or a properly compensated saddle on an acoustic. I built the first corr3ctly compensated saddle for an acoustic that I ever saw almost 30 years ago. I throw saddles away out of Taylor’s, Gibson’s, Martins. These makers have never put a properly compensated d saddle on a guitar...even though .gibson has used properly compensated bridges on acoustic arch top ‘jazz’ guitars for many decades. Even Collings, Santa Cruz and Bourgoise blow the compensation on their handmade saddles at times..... Modern made in Asia guitars almost always have properly compensated saddles.
     
  8. Matthias

    Matthias Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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  9. El Marin

    El Marin Tele-Afflicted

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    I always thought it was just a Gibson stopbar
     
  10. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    The bridge posts are canted to one side to compensate for intonation on the OP post, maybe that’s why they technically call it “compensated”? I don’t know because it looks like a typical waraparound bridge, which is accurate for a 50s build. I also detect a slight peak on the bridge to keep the string from buzzing, but it looks nothing like a MojoAxe bridge. The Mojo bridge is 3-plain-string compensated.

    I love bar bridges, and they can get very decent intonation, especially with a wound G. But no, a plain G is already sensitive to pressure, etc. I won’t give up on a bar bridge though, and a Jr. deserves a solid aluminum bridge. Nothing else like it.

    I use solid Faber bridges, but I can’t find them anymore. The most recent one I found came from Germany (of course) but it looked like B-stock. I couldn’t get the A to intonate my DC Special tribute (which has straight posts, not canted), I think I need locking posts for it because it rocked forward, so the witness point was thrown off. Instead of locking posts though, I tried the solid bar Resomax, and that was even worse in terms of range of movement. Can’t intonate that without moving the bridge nearly off the posts.

    The lightning bar that came with my Gibson was the best option, though it’s cast zinc pot metal or whatever. Next string change it’s going back on, because it still sounded pretty good.

    F8C7A0F3-5871-46B0-88F1-C8E82C286BB1.jpeg BC263E30-2A06-4495-871B-AF520EBF0576.jpeg
     
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  11. zippofan

    zippofan Tele-Afflicted

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    The Tone Pros on my AXL Junior intonates well, better than a Faber or ABM on my Gibson LP Melody Maker. That's getting the stock lightning bridge back for next string change.
     
  12. Jim603

    Jim603 Tele-Meister

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    I have the exact same guitar, I can't get the neck pickup low enough. It looks like yours goes lower than mine. Did you have any trouble lowering it?
     
  13. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I had that problem too, and it’s because the mounting plate get’s in the way. I removed those brackets and converted the pickups back to traditional wood-mount. You can get it flush with the pickguard that way. I’ll delete the mounting screw holes when I make a 1-ply tort guard for it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2020
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  14. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    So here's the issue as I see it; unless you have your low E string real low down (which is too much rattle for me!) Compensation up there is a ruse anyway. DO you want the open E true? or do you want the E at the 12th fret true? The stretch of that big string makes it sharp when fretting it up there. But won't it sound worse if it's flat when open? I just went through this today intoating a guitar... Intonated perfectly at open E or at 12th fret?
    I guess I'm very much a "sweep" chorder much of the time (like SRV on Pride N Joy for instance) Too minimal fret clearance on low E and it rattles on that or boogie stuff etc.
    When it comes down to it, I only end up playing those high up low E and A string notes in a lead situation, and who can tell when you're play 4 notes a second?
     
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  15. drmmrr55

    drmmrr55 Tele-Holic

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    Nah, it's just dirty because I haven't changed the strings since I had it set-up back in February, (I've been playing it a lot, because there's nothing else to do). It will soon get new strings, a cleaning, and treatment for the rosewood!
     
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