Lemon sauce for salmon-Can you help me make it?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Boxla, Nov 19, 2019.

  1. Boxla

    Boxla Tele-Meister

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    HI all. Does anyone have a tried and true recipe for a lemon salmon sauce? I go salmon fishing every year in Alaska and am constantly trying to prepare it differently. I always like the lemon sauces I get at restaurants but after several attempts, I haven't had too much success in dialing in my own recipe.

    My go-to preparation lately for the salmon has been. de-scale it and dry the filet. season meat side. Heat skillet and fry it skin down. Then flip over on meat side for a few more minutes. It's the method I prefer the most. The fried skin is the best part. I've been to exactly one restaurant that serves theirs like this and it's always the best salmon I get. But with theirs, I am able to use my fork and break off each bite. With mine I have to use a serrated knife because if I don't the whole skin slides off. I don't know how this restaurant avoids that happening.

    Does anyone do a teriyaki sauce for your salmon?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Guitarzan

    Guitarzan Poster Extraordinaire

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    The sorrel sauce for salmon the French make is excellent.

     
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  3. IronSchef

    IronSchef Tele-Holic

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    I just saute some minced garlic in some butter -- then squeeze in some fresh lemon juice, salt, and pepper and whisk it up! :)
     
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  4. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    I do various things, but I never eat the skin. My family always said it's not good for you as it sticks like glue... possibly to your insides! If you have ever left salmon/fish scales/skin etc on a surface to dry out, it's dang near impossible to remove!

    At any rate for lemon I just:
    -cook it with Lemon slices, butter or oil, and thin onion slices on the flesh too. It's pretty good.

    My other go-to is: soy sauce, a bit of brown sugar in the soy. Kinda teriyaki.

    My wife used to do a mustard type of sauce that I really liked, olive oil with mustard in it etc. I really liked it.

    I used to make fish jerky a lot, brined it over night in soy, brown sugar, water and salt. (I just dried it in the sun on cookie racks when living aboard the boat in Mexico, but that wasn't salmon) Salmon jerky is killer good just oven dried, very low oven temp.
     
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  5. dogmeat

    dogmeat Tele-Afflicted

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    ha ha... late in the season the bears only eat the skin (and sometimes the head/brains). they ignore the meat

    so, not lemon, but a good salmon recipe: mix sour cream and mayo 50/50, give it a HEAVY dose of dill, a chop of onion, and a shake of salt & pepper and maybe a shake of garlic powder. then dose it with some more dill. make enough to cover the fish and bake until the top browns. this is actually the 'ol Juneau halibut recipe but works on others.

    if you like salmon this will move to a top spot on the list. as a side I like to make potato wedges... cut like fries, put the wedges in a bag, toss with seasoning (the easiest is something like McCormic's Montreal), shake it, oil it, shake it, then pour on to a cookie sheet & bake
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2019
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  6. basher

    basher Tele-Afflicted

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    Hollandaise is nice. Couple of egg yolks and juice of maybe half a lemon in a double boiler, whisk till it starts to thicken, whisk in a couple of tbsp of butter. Easy.
     
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  7. Geoff738

    Geoff738 Poster Extraordinaire

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    After the salmon is out of the pan with the heat medium low I just chuck in a bit of butter, squeeze in some lemon and add a few capers and when it’s come together and reduced a bit on it goes. Garnish with parsley if you want to get all fancy.

    Very simple but you don’t want to overpower the salmon.
    Cheers,
    Geoff
     
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  8. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    classic lemon butter sauce: (for family meal) if serving less than four, cut recipe in half...

    Squeeze juice from half a lemon into small bowl.

    in small sauce pan, heat 8 Tablespoons butter (salted is ok, if using unsalted, then add salt & little pepper at end). You're going to just brown the butter, takes about 3 minutes - you will see and smell the difference - just as it starts to brown, it will smell nutty - that's enough, pull it off the heat, into your serving bowl. Add the fresh squeezed lemon, stir until it's all blended. Spoon on your salmon.

    My evil twin, Skippy, says that browned butter is called "beurre noisette" by the French. He says look it up in your Larousse Gastronomique. But he says lots of crazy stuff.
     
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  9. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Lordy! The skin is the best part!

    I don't have a recipe handy but I watched a video for salmon with pasta and the kicker was the salmon skin! When the fillet is cooked, slide off the skin, chop it up and fry it in olive oil until it's crispy like bacon, then sprinkle that on top of the finished dish.
     
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  10. Nightclub Dwight

    Nightclub Dwight Tele-Afflicted

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    I love salmon skin when its crispy. But I think its pretty gross if not crispy.

    I've had trouble getting it to crisp up at home. But just like poultry skin, I think its important for it to be dry when you cook it. Any moisture will just steam it, making it rubbery.

    I've had some success getting it crispy on the grill. I have aftermarket grill grates which get very hot, which helps.

    https://www.grillgrate.com/

    If you're doing it in a skillet like you mention, I'd make sure that the fish is completely dry. Maybe leave it overnight on a wire rack over a sheet pan in your fridge. The dry air will help to get all the moisture off of the fish. Also, you should probably use more oil in the skillet than you normally would, and get the pan nice and hot. Make sure to use a heavy weight pan like cast iron, a steel skillet, or a quality pan from All Clad. Non-stick pans are not going to get you there. Hot pan, hot oil, dry surface on the fish.
     
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  11. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Tele-Afflicted

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    I've been using one very similar to this for many years. https://sweetandsavorymeals.com/sauce-for-salmon/

    I also will make an herb compound butter. I really like Basil or Sage...or Tarragon butters. Make ahead and put a chunk on your salmon at the very end, just before it comes out of the pan.

    Crispy skin is da bomb! You gotta get the heat right (cast iron is #1). Trial and error is the only way...good thing is, you get to eat your mistakes. I don't oil my pan, I oil the fish...and I just pat it dry with paper towels.
     
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  12. Lawdawg

    Lawdawg Tele-Holic

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    Can't recommend this technique enough. Making a quick pan sauce is a simple and tried and true method for getting a great sauce and works for any kind of meat. A couple of quick suggestions.

    - Works better with a cast iron skillet than non stick because the cast iron will pick up more bits of the fish and skin to add flavor to your sauce. If I'm adding garlic I cook it in the fat from cooking the fish.
    - Before adding the butter, I like to quickly deglaze the pan with white wine and lemon juice, bring the liquid to boil and reduce.
    - After reducing the liquid I then whisk in the butter while the liquid is at boiling temp. If done correctly, the butter will melt but stay emulsified with the cooking liquid yielding a rich buttery but smooth sauce, sort of a bootleg beurre blanc pan sauce.
    - at the end add herbs, capers, or parsley to finish.
     
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