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Leaving guitar near air conditioner

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Chicken Curry, Jan 22, 2021.

  1. Chicken Curry

    Chicken Curry Tele-Meister

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    Is it safe to leave a solid body guitar in the same room as a running air con? ( < for those who have ADHD, now let me elaborate: )

    I had a guy tell me how he used to have an acoustic guitar that kept splitting at the middle seam on the body. His repairer told him to stop leaving it in the same room as a running air con because it dries the air rapidly resulting in the wood splitting at the seams. Can't remember if this happened over the course of a few days or one day.

    Question is, is this something that can happen to a solid body guitar? Has anyone here have this happen to them or someone you know? Typically, solid body guitars are comprised of 2-5 pieces. Not being hollow might prevent splitting. I have seen Les Pauls with the top maple cap coming off due to some type of damage.

    Could the air con and sudden temp changes also damage/warp the neck? This might be more likely to happen perhaps.

    As I sit here in the hot weather, I have a three piece body Strat sitting up on the wall as the air con's on in the lounge room. It's very close to the air con, nothing's happened to it yet I just don't want anything happening to it down the line. I'd like to keep at least one guitar in the lounge room, it's just too convenient and makes you want to practice more.
     
  2. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted

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    Air cons dry the air. No good will come of it for your guitar: neck problems, fret 'sprout', general wood shrinkage and cracking.
    More noticeable with acoustics because the bare wood of the interior is directly exposed to humidity and heat changes. (And the wood being thinner will dry out quicker.) I keep all my guitars in their cases.
    So, on an electric, more effect on the neck than the body (IMO).
     
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  3. MrCairo46

    MrCairo46 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    I try to keep humidity constant 45% to 65 % in my guitar garage here in Baltimore Maryland , USA.

    steam Humidifier December thru March and dehumidifier starting in June thru October. Protect your wood I always say......
     
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  4. Chicago Matt

    Chicago Matt Friend of Leo's

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    Here in humid Georgia, the problem is in the winter, when the air is drier and forced air heating in the house dries it out further. The only problem I have with my solid body electrics is the need to adjust the truss rod when the weather changes twice a year. I've also gotten fret sprout on my necks with no or very thin finish. Once that's taken care of the first time, it doesn't come back.
     
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  5. hemingway

    hemingway Poster Extraordinaire

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    Living in damp and murky olde Englande doth have some advantages after all, I troth.
     
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  6. El Tele Lobo

    El Tele Lobo Poster Extraordinaire

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    If it's a solid-body tele with a thick neck (or a roasted neck), you probably don't have too much to worry about unless you run your air crazy low continuously. If it's intermittent and moderate temps, you are probably fine. Just don't place your guitar right under an AC vent.

    This is more of an issue for acoustic instruments, archtops and possibly semi-hollows. Hence the humidifier kits you see in acoustic guitar shops.

    With solid bodies and necks, a bigger issue is HEAT, particularly hot, stuffy attics/garages and old-school radiator heat. Never store ANY instrument in such conditions.

    Keeping guitars stored away from extreme hot and cold, and in their cases when not in use, is a good rule of thumb.
     
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