Laminated necks

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Laren, Sep 16, 2020.

  1. Laren

    Laren Tele-Meister

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    Hi guys,

    Am I missing something, if you have two (it would usually be more but) pieces of wood stuck together, one white and one dark, how do you stop the white one getting dirty as you sand them down?

    Ta
     
  2. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    The dark dust will not usually get into the wood pores. It could I suppose if it was real oily wood like rosewood, cocobolo etc. But I've not had it do it with Rosewood.
     
  3. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    non-existent problem. sorry. it just doesn't happen that way. try it and report back. Take pictures.
     
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  4. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Agree, not really a problem but if you're grinding dark dust into light wood with your sandpaper, don't sand cross grain and don't keep mashing the old dust into the new wood.
    A really open grain wood might pick up dust, but you should be able to give it a blast with the air nozzle from your compressor and clear all the grain of dust that gut left there.
    If your compressor is an oil case type, and also typically gathers moisture, make sure you drain off the moisture in the tank and blow out the hose to make sure nothing but clean air comes out of the nozzle.
    This is common practice in wood finishing, blowing all the dust out of the grain.

    But wood finishing generally has an oilless compressor, since the compressed air drives the sprayed finish and cannot contain any water or oils.
     
  5. Laren

    Laren Tele-Meister

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    Cheers guys I'm sure it won't be a problem, I'll watch out for the points mentioned next time. I had a few blemishes this first go but I put a bit of stain on when I oiled the finish and am happy with the result. First time building a set neck so just used some bits I had around.

    IMG_20200911_193309.jpg
     
  6. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    I was assuming that all surfaces are clean and dry before applying any finish.

    compressed air can work, or the bristle nozzle on a vacuum cleaner or even just a damp rag. If you’re keeping the wood surface relatively clean while sanding, shouldn’t be much dust anywhere on your wood surface.
     
  7. Peegoo

    Peegoo Friend of Leo's

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    That looks like really nice work, Laren.

    Know that by laminating wood, you are doing The Lord's work--for it is written in Genesis chapter 1, verse 28: "...Be fruitful and multi-ply and fill the earth..."

    Yep, I paid attention in Sunday School!
     
  8. Macrogats

    Macrogats Friend of Leo's

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    I’m with Peegoo - that’s a good looking neck. Great job. What guitar is it going on?
     
  9. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    It is a problem, particularly with very dark woods like ebony and very light woods like spruce. I sand and then as a final step use a scraper. I'll always scrape binding and purfling and other light lines that are next to dark wood.
     
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  10. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    ^^^^This

    A few angled blasts of compressed air solves that specific problem. You may *initially* get some ebony dust in the spruce but it blows out in seconds. I must have done something similar at least a hundred times - it's NOT a problem.
     
  11. Peegoo

    Peegoo Friend of Leo's

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    Another issue that sometimes occurs is when applying finish to lams that contain colored woods like bloodwood, purpleheart, bubinga, cocobolo, and some others in the rosewood (dalbergia) family is the color can bleed into the finish and flow onto adjacent lighter woods.

    If you have colored woods like this next to maple and other bright woods, use very light mist coats and allow them to tack up well before shooting the next coat. If you shoot liquid coats it can make you crazy. Same goes for clearcoats over light binding next to colored woods.
     
  12. Laren

    Laren Tele-Meister

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    IMG_20200917_150301.jpg
    Hi, this one
     
  13. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    I use a lot of light colored purfling lines, usually maple, along side darker woods. I scrape them to get them as clean as I can (in spite of what others have said about it not being a problem) and I then paint a coupe of coats of vinyl sealer right on the line with a very small artists brush. That keeps most of the color from bleeding into the binding, I still might scrape them a couple more times as I'm doing the finish.
     
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