Lacquer Spot Fill Question

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by jrintheemaking, Oct 18, 2020 at 7:08 AM.

  1. jrintheemaking

    jrintheemaking TDPRI Member

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    Hi I am looking to repair a top layer scratch in a Fender 2006 guitar. I believe the color is number 10 (Metallic Blue). The guitar is totally mint except for this one scratch, which looks like it it hasn’t penetrated the color.

    I am novice in terms of performing a task such as this. Would I be able to fill the scratch with one of those clear coat lacquer layer pens from Stew Mac (plus some wet sanding). Or is this repair beyond a simple remedy?

    Any help in terms of advice, tips, or process this would be greatly appreciated! Thanks
     

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  2. jrintheemaking

    jrintheemaking TDPRI Member

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    Bump :(
     
  3. bullfrogblues

    bullfrogblues Friend of Leo's

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    I doubt the guitar has a lacquer finish. If the scratch isn't into the color I'd use super glue and build it up until it's a little over size. Scrape it close with a razor blade then wet sand and polish.
    Try some super glue in one of the pickup cavities if the paint is in there to see if it's compatible.
     
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  4. Peegoo

    Peegoo Friend of Leo's

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    Another option for these sorts of finish repairs is clear nail lacquer.

    Drop-fill, scrape flush, gently wet sand and polish.

    If the scratch does not go into the color layer the repair will be practically invisible. If it does reach into the color layer, it will be visible, but substantially less so than it is now.

    The lacquer pens from Stooge Mac will work, but they are stupid expensive for what they are.

    If you want your guitar to look pristine, take it to a reputable shop and have them do the repair. It's less expensive than you may think.
     
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  5. Boreas

    Boreas Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I call that patina. A mark of character. As soon as you spend time/effort/treasure on fixing it, you will get another scratch.
     
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  6. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    That scratch appears to be through the blue metallic into the prime coat. So just a clear filler (likely not lacquer but what model is it?) will not make it go away. Very difficult color to match up. Maybe there is some auto touch up that's close?
    Just some thoughts:
    -get an artist brush from an art or hobby store. I have one that the hair is about the size of a tooth pick tip.
    -mask either side of the scratch nearly to the scratch edge.
    - touch it up with paint that is as close as you can get.
    -Repeat coats as necessary until it is full or above the surface.
    -After drying, decide if you want to go further or if you like it well enough.

    If you really want to try to make it disappear:
    -wet sand as small an area at the scratch as you can using progressive paper from 400-1000 or finer. (body shops, NAPA etc have paper up to maybe 2000 grit.)
    -When it's as smooth as you can get, buff it with a foam wheel and 3M Finesse It. This final step is the only thing I've found to work to make it shine. )or.. at least some sort of buffer) The foam wheel will make it shine in seconds.

    Beware:
    -unless you have perfect paint color, it may show anyway.
    -There is some risk that it may not buff as well as I have experienced. On an Ibanez archtop I was about to give up on getting rid of the blush from wet sanding, then tried the foam wheel and ... ouila!
    -Some of the hard polyester finishes may or may not buff well. SO the trade off is: Do I try to make it perfect and risk that the blush from sanding wont buff out? That will be a larger "defect" than just filling the scratch.
    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Friend of Leo's

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    If it is lacquer then drop fill or subsequent coats will melt in to the old finish and can be buffed out. It is difficult to do, but can be done.

    If it is a catalyzed modern finish (which I would suspect it is) then nothing really melts the old stuff. Your best results would be flowing CA into the seam, then scraping and buffing. GlueBoost is an excellent product and has good videos on their web site.

    The first step is to do the test to find out what you have.

    PS - I'll add that I do a lot of repair work but I've completely stopped trying to repair catalyzed finishes - I simply can't do it to my satisfaction. I'll let someone else have the hassle.
     
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  8. Boreas

    Boreas Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Something you may want to consider is an automotive scratch "repair" system. Sometimes it is nothing more than some very fine "magic crystals" that optically make the scratch much less obvious. Some involve more prep than others, but I have used them on my cars before and they sorta work! They obviously do not eliminate the scratch, but do fill it somewhat and make it less obvious.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2020 at 2:21 PM
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  9. Audiotrove

    Audiotrove TDPRI Member

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    Metallic paint is very hard to match, even if you have the exact color. It's hard to tell from your photos if that is actually a scratch or just paint transfer from something else. Paint transfer can be buffed out. Even carefully wet buffing with a piece of automobile polishing clay might work well for that.

    On the other hand, if it is truly a scratch, it looks deep enough to be through any clear coat and the metallic paint, and your chances of getting that fixed perfectly are basically nil. You can certainly fill it with wood filler, sand it down and buff it out, then fill it with metallic blue paint, buff it out with a very high grit buffing pad, coat that with whatever clear coat is on it, and then buff that out too, but it hardly seems worth it.

    I'm past the point of caring too much about bumps and dings. If the guitar is worth anything at all, its value will mainly be in rarity and age. Guitars I bought 20 years ago for $1500 are now worth triple that, dings and all.
     
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  10. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Don't do anything before you hit it with some rubbing compound.
    If it doesn't fix it, it'll give you a better idea of what you're up against.
     
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  11. jrintheemaking

    jrintheemaking TDPRI Member

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    Thank you for taking so much time to reply to my post. The guitar is a 2005 MIM Specia Edition strat in Metallic Blue, in otherwise new condition.
     
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