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lacquer fast drying techniques

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by sansa, Oct 23, 2013.

  1. sansa

    sansa Tele-Meister

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    Hi there! I would ask you if you know any kind of way to dry lacquer faster.
    I'm on the "sticky phase" but I'm not so patient to wait an other couple of weeks.

    I'm thinking of using a hair dryer. Could you tell me how to use it and if it is OK for acrylic lacquer?

    Thank you :)
     
  2. dconeill

    dconeill Tele-Afflicted

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    The secret method is patience. Application of heat could lead to curing of the finish in an uneven way, with the top (outside) outgassing faster than the finish inside that, which means the inside would take even longer to cure.

    Go read a book or two, take your mind off of it. Suggestion: reread "The Spy Who Came In From The Cold", "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy", "The Honorable Schoolboy", and "Smiley's People" in that order.
     
  3. gitlvr

    gitlvr Friend of Leo's

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    Yep. However, I have read posts from builders who I trust to know what they are talking about that the circulation of fresh air does more to promote drying than heat or any other method.
     
  4. sansa

    sansa Tele-Meister

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    Ok I'll try to forget that idea :)
    I read of many products that increase velocity of curing process. are these good method?
     
  5. Chritty

    Chritty Tele-Afflicted

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    Heat is not good for acrylic lacquer, nor is sunlight
     
  6. allen082

    allen082 Friend of Leo's

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    air movement is better than heat. I have a box fan that I put on low in the garage, - and not pointed directly at the guitar. That plus a little "gentle" heat in the summer and I'm ready to go in a few days.

    Every climate and brand of lacquer is differnt though. Above everything, don't rush.
     
  7. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    I was just talking about this. Somewhere on here I read about someone (bob1234 I think, again sorry if it's not you) said adding a little bit of acetone to the lacquer mixture will help with running and also curing times. I'm not sure what the mix is exactly but I have read about it here.
     
  8. sansa

    sansa Tele-Meister

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    ok thank you very much guys. I'll let it dry naturally!
     
  9. dutchgoff

    dutchgoff Tele-Holic

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    If you will just force yourself to be patient the end result will make the patients part easer next time. It is just as fast to wait as to have to redo or be unsatisfied.
     
  10. gitlvr

    gitlvr Friend of Leo's

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    I know how difficult this is. I have a body and neck hanging in the shed as we speak. Been about 2 weeks, and I so much want to grab it and start level sanding and polishing. But I know from retched experience that if I go mucking about with it, it's gonna be a sad day at gitlvr's house. So I'll find something else to occupy my time for a couple more weeks, minimum.
     
  11. Drum Strummer

    Drum Strummer TDPRI Member

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    Sansa,

    Heed Chritty's warning here. I'm a neewbie and let my beautifully finished body get exposed to directly sunlight while curing - it bubbled up like a hot cheese pizza.

    Time and warm air circulation are what it takes to cure a finish. Be patient as it pays off in the end.
     
  12. loversmoon69

    loversmoon69 Tele-Meister

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    ive sprayed in direct sunlight on a cool day and not had any bad experiences. But mind you it wasn't direct heat for any length of time. as to putting direct heat on it. Yes Id have to agree that is not a good idea at all. good flow of air is certainly the best key to a quick drying finish.
     
  13. bob1234

    bob1234 Tele-Afflicted

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    Not me xD

    But 10-20% acetone reduction will aid drying times a little bit. Allows it to flash off faster. It will NOT help with running though, it will make it easier to run actually. Thin, even coats are mandatory when you thin out paints. If its a clear coat, I never care about runs anyway, thats what wetsanding and buffing are for! :D


    UV and Heat do NOT help laquer to dry, unless its specifically designed to be baked or UV cured. UV lamps on a laquer thats not UV cure will simply promote cracking and more then likely will yellow the clear coat fast. Direct heat will not help either, as you are specifically heating one spot at a time causing the gasses in that spot to expand really fast... which you guessed it, causes bubbles. Higher ambient temperature in a dry environment is best, but we're talking 100-110 degrees, not the usual 150 that ovens get to (I've tried!).
     
  14. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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  15. bob1234

    bob1234 Tele-Afflicted

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    As a general rule, most thinners are 10-20% for almost all paints. No offense taken at all, I don't use nitro/laquers much anymore, and I never bother thinning them out usually. I usually just put it in a dry corner for a long time and come back to it later xD
     
  16. K-Line

    K-Line Tele-Holic Vendor Member

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    Trick is to apply no more than 2 coats per day. I use a 2500 scuff pad before the next days coats to open up the surface. No necessary, not sure why I even still do this, just habit I suppose. Good ventilation is key. After the last coat, scuff the surface, this will help the solvents escape.
     
  17. sansa

    sansa Tele-Meister

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    man I'm talking about exposing to sunlight in the "sticky phase"!
    It means that I don't want to expose it till it is really dryed! But when it has to "cure" (different thing than dry)
     
  18. bob1234

    bob1234 Tele-Afflicted

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    Doesn't matter. Nitro takes years to cure, and can still bubble after a long time when exposed to high heat and direct sunlight. Doesn't mean it WILL happen, simply means it CAN.
     
  19. surfoverb

    surfoverb Doctor of Teleocity

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    what I do is 3 light passes per coat, let it dry for 3 hours, then do another coat, let dry 3 hours, then another coat and let dry over night. No more than 3 coats a day. spray for 3 days like this and then let it dry for 3 days. when drying I hang it in a closet and have a small fan oscillating in the closet (not blowing staright onto the body, you just want air circulating in the area to help blow off the off-gassing.

    Patience is the key. You cant rush these things.

    when all dont painting let dry for 3 months, then youre ready for final wet sand and polishing.

    the important things to remember is spray very light coats, and give time for each to dry.

    heres a recent pic of my Tele I painted 2-3 years ago, no pitting or any signs of rushed work. I used oil-based grain filler>Deft sanding sealer(1 can)>Reranch color(3/4 can)>minwax clear nitro(5 cans)
    [​IMG]
     
  20. flatfive

    flatfive Friend of Leo's

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    I think a lot depends on the lacquer you're using. In the 2012
    build challenge I sprayed Sherwin-Williams LOVOC, and having
    only 3 days to go, aimed a box fan at it on low from about
    8 feet away, as well as a small room heater aimed at the
    body from maybe 6 feet away. So basically it was a warmish
    breeze.

    It wet-sanded and buffed fine after three days and I see
    no change in the finish after 18 months.
     
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