karaoke mic to guitar amp connection

Discussion in 'Modeling Amps, Plugins and Apps' started by chinesepugpvp, Jan 21, 2020.

  1. chinesepugpvp

    chinesepugpvp TDPRI Member

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    hey guys,

    does anyone know what adapter I need to connect any condenser, karaoke, wireless, etc. mic to my guitar amp so I can sing through my amp and possibly play any guitar at the same time?

    I also wanted to connect a synthesizer or some kind of add-on distortion box / foot pedals as well

    Is this possible or do i have to choose between a mic or guitar to make sound come from amp?

    The adapter i bought didn't fit the end of the mic and not sure where to connect mic, distortions box, etc.

    Thanks!
     

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  2. LGOberean

    LGOberean Doctor of Teleocity

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    In the year 2000, when I started playing out, my wife and kids got together and got me a mic and an amp, a Shure SM58 and a Crate TX30 "Taxi". As the pic below shows, the amp's two inputs were for 1/4" male jack plugs. So I'd plug a guitar into one of the amps inputs, and a mic into the other.
    Crate TX30 'Taxi' rear panel.jpg

    Here's how I did it. I used a standard XLR mic cable, connecting the female side to the mic, then used an impedance matching transformer connected to the male XLR end, like this...
    Mic cable connected to adapter.jpg

    Then I could plug the SM58 into the Taxi's 1/4" input. I had two such adapter/transformer plugs, one was a Radio Shack 274-016c, the other an Audio-Technica CP8201.
    Mic XLR to quarter inch plug adapter-transformer, Radio Shack 274-016c.jpg Mic XLR to quarter inch plug adapter-transformer, Audio-Technica CP8201.jpg

    They both worked equally well. I gave one of them away years ago, I honestly can't remember which one I kept, without checking my gig bag. I haven't used it in years. I upgraded from the Taxi in 2008, and that amp was lost in a house fire in 2010. I now have a couple of Fishman Loudbox amps, and so I never need the adapter/transformer anymore.

    Here is a pic of me from around 2008, at a coffee house gig, using that Shure mic, with the adapter/transformer into the Crate Taxi.
    Me at Calypso, ca. 2008 - 2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2020
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  3. chinesepugpvp

    chinesepugpvp TDPRI Member

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    thanks larry. also for sharing your story bc 2000's is when i got the marshall and haven't played it in a while

    i don't have 2 inputs like your amp, would it work on mine?
     
  4. LGOberean

    LGOberean Doctor of Teleocity

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    When I first looked at the pics of your amp, I saw your cable plugged into the input, and what I thought was another jack input beside it. Had I looked closely, I would have seen that it was for a footswitch. That front panel also has an input for a CD and an emulated line out, but apparently not another input. So you could still plug a mic into it in the manner I described above, or plug in a guitar. But I don't see how you'd be able to both plug a guitar and a mic into that amp simultaneously.

    I should add that all I said above is based on the output impedance of the mic I was using. The Shure SM58 mic has a low output impedance and I was plugging it into an amp with high Z (impedance) inputs. That's why I needed an adapter (from XLR to 1/4") that was also a transformer (from low impedance to high). If you have a microphone with high impedance output you could plug straight into the amp. Generally, a high Z mic will have a cable that is XLR on one end and 1/4" on the other...
    [​IMG]
     
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  5. mfguitar

    mfguitar Tele-Afflicted

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    The CD input is going to require at least a line level signal to produce sound from a mike, something like a small mixer, this could also control the volume. The pedals could plug in front of the guitar input: Guitar > Distortion Pedal > Amp. I am not clear what type of plug is on your microphone, 1/4"? If so it should plug into any of the inputs but without a mixer or preamp into the CD input you will get little output.
     
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  6. VintageSG

    VintageSG Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    You'll have all manner of issues with it as it stands. Nothing'll blow up, but it won't be a good solution.

    The AUX/CD input requires a higher level than a dynamic mic will put out. A condenser mic will need a phantom supply. A keyboard may or may not work into the AUX/CD input. A dynamic mic will work into the guitar input, but it'll sound like refried butt-bounty at volume. The keyboard will work into the guitar input. Another issue with the AUX/CD input is controlling the level.

    One solution, although not ideal, is an inexpensive mixer that offers inputs for your mic and keyboard and a line out. Mix the mic and keyboard volume levels, set the output level and away you go. Vocals don't sound through a guitar amp at volume though.

    A better solution would be a busking amp such as the Roland Street Cube or something dedicated to the task of multiple disparate inputs and designed for the purpose such as the Laney Audiohub range ( other such products are available )
     
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  7. nomadh

    nomadh Tele-Afflicted

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    Someone can probably explain this better but I believe when you plug 2 instruments into 1 amp it doesn't work well when the 2 connections just go to 1 wire. It's like the 2 things fight for amplification unless there is a preamp circuit at each input. Most amps dont have that. That's more like a mixing board or pa.
     
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  8. chinesepugpvp

    chinesepugpvp TDPRI Member

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  9. chinesepugpvp

    chinesepugpvp TDPRI Member

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    i was afraid that i would have to choose a mic vs or guitar (which I have plugged into the am in the pic)

    however, i'm sure that as long as i have a good mic plugged into the amp, my acoustic guitar sound will travel to the mic and the amp will produce the guitar sound

    Or I could get a sound bar for my PC and somehow hook the mic and sing through PC sound bar speakers?

    I really like the quality of Sennheiser not Bose. Anyone have recommendation on the cheapest best quality sound bar receiver so I can hook up a mic to it and sing?

    Also, a brief explanation on how to connect everything so the mic works?

    Thank you so much everyone! I've learned a lot
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2020
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