Just oiled my finish and I want to re-paint it, please help!

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by branbolio, Sep 22, 2020.

  1. branbolio

    branbolio Tele-Meister

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    46332E6F-EEB4-4745-90CC-3A4AC5C5B3D2.jpeg I’m working on my first parts tele build... A nice paulownia thinline body from guitarmill. Pic was before final sanding and oil.

    I was going for a semi transparent Milkpaint finish with Hemp oil on top of that. Well I got the hemp oil on (2 coats) earlier today and I’m realizing I should do a solid finish, the trans finish just does not look good and revealed some spots that need more sanding. I just want to sand it off and redo the paint to a solid Milk paint finish.

    Do I need to wait for the oil to fully dry/cure? Or should I just start sanding it off wet?
     
  2. branbolio

    branbolio Tele-Meister

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    FEB5CFEC-A4B7-4A6A-9CC0-425D278005FA.jpeg Here’s the oiled body pic
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2020
  3. Peegoo

    Peegoo Friend of Leo's

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    I have no idea what hemp oil is. Is it supposed to dry completely? Or stay oily like teak oil?

    If it dries completely, sand it all back smooth. If you're shooting an opaque color, no need to remove all the old finish; just sand everything smooth with 220 and then shoot a few thin coats of shellac. Shellac is inert and can be used between two incompatible finishes. It prevents wrinkling, etc. If you plan on doing a transparent finish, you'll probebly get the best results by sanding all the finish off.

    If that oil is soft stuff that never dries, you are on in for an adventure because getting all of it out of the wood can be really problematic; hard finishes over previously-oiled wood have adhesion problems. You can use a chemical stripper, as well as do multiple wipes with acetone to get as much of the stuff out of the wood as possible, but there are no guarantees.
     
  4. Boreas

    Boreas Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Removing all of the finish down to bare wood and trying to get as much oil out of the wood as possible will give you the most options for going forward. Just remember to re-seal the wood. You may find your milk finish may work better from a blank slate.
     
  5. stratisfied

    stratisfied Tele-Meister

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    Lacquer thinner back to bare wood. If you're going to use that milk paint then you need to use a water based clear over it.
     
  6. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    Yes. And don't use solvents, they will just cause what you have applied to soak deeper into the wood. Pawlonia is good as a tonewood, but it's the cheapest, softest, most porous wood sed in guitar construction - it's like a sponge. You have to be very careful when sanding as well, as you can dig deep gouges into it in seconds.

    This has been stated in hundreds of threads - never apply any material to your guitar until you have applied the ENTIRE system, including final buffing, to scrap wood and gotten the results you are shooting for.

    If you are new to finishing you may need to do five, six, or more practice applications before you get it right. You have to learn how products interact, the application techniques for each, equipment needed if f you don't already have it, proper safety procedures etc.

    And whatever you are applying, do it in VERY thin coats. as an example, lacquer should be applied in a coat consisting of three extremely thing passes - and a single coat will not cover or flow out. That starts at the third or fourth coat.

    Practice, go slow, stop if you have problems and figure out why. Learn on scrap - NOT on your guitar. $50 and $400 bodies are treated the same way.

    The single most common cause of coatings problems is not lack of experience - it's impatience.
     
  7. branbolio

    branbolio Tele-Meister

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    Thanks great advice. I did sand the top already and hopefully I didn’t get any gouges. I plan to apply the milk paint much thicker this time. Bummer I don’t have any scrap paulownia all I had was pine and it definitely covered differently on that. I feel hopeful all will work out.
     
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