Just how hardheaded am I? (gonna buy a power planer)

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by mchet, Apr 17, 2009.

  1. Scatter Lee

    Scatter Lee Friend of Leo's

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    you got that right, and dont hit the screws thats for sure, I'll have to make a video for youtube one of these days, to see it in action shows just how easy it is, i guess you could call it a manual plotter
     
  2. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

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    If you want a planer on a budget, this is probably the cheapest option. About $50. As long as you have a drill press that is.

     
  3. mchet

    mchet Tele-Holic

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    I actually looked at drill presses yesterday thinking of exactly that Shepard... Thanks. Still can't afford one right now.

    Nice Dogs by the way! Check out http://www.emoderndog.com ...
     
  4. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I have a hand held power planer, and that SOB is essentially useless unless you are trying to sure up doors or hardwood flooring.
     
  5. Jack Wells

    Jack Wells Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Hmmm.............. I wonder if it would be possible to build a jig somthing like Scatter Lee's router/planer but instead of using a router, it would use a power planer............ probably not worth the effort.

    For someone starting out I think the first major purchase after the router should be a 12 in. drill press. The Delta benchtop model is currently around $190.

    Woodworker's Supply has a knockoff of the Wagner Safety Planer for about $27.

    http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/fullpres.exe?PARTNUM=24760&LARGEVIEW=ON

    [​IMG]
     
  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The rail method of router planing was first seen when people were taking cypress tree sections and making clocks out of them 20-25 or more years ago. you'd see this method often in the "methods of work tips" in fine woodworking magazine and similar home mags. You just need two parallel blocks that are higher than the blank itself. You mount your router to a flat board that is wider than the rails. Forget the planer and electric plane for now. You will use the router for just about everything as you accumulate tools. A one inch straight bit will probably be the best. You could even possible hot melt glue the blank down to the bottom board. I've heard this used as a method to hold the work still besides using double sided tape. The board the router is mounted to needs to be about 1.5 times the width between the rails in order to get the bit to the extreme sides. I made a jig like this a few years ago to plane the 4.5 degree neck angle on a les Paul I was making. I just had sloped rails instead of flat rails.
    Here is a link.

    http://74.125.47.132/search?q=cache...FWNPDF/011077042.pdf&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

    http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?PageAction=Custom&ID=58
     
  7. spacey

    spacey Tele-Meister

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    i'd go with a router jig .... that drill press cutter looks like a finger eater. what ever happened to push-sticks ? plus a router would be more versatile.
     
  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The Wagner safety planer method is pretty safe, as the cutters are within the outer diameter of the casting. I own one. It still leaves swirl marks and is very similar to what we are talking about with the router except it does a 2" path or so. I remember seeing a picture of the original wood surfacers at early sawmills and they used a rotating cutter bit to plane the rough wood down.
     
  9. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

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    I've used a very crude method similar but cruder to SctterLee's, and had great success. I've looked into the Wagner Safety Planer, but couldn't afford it just yet. Word of Caution: I believe if you use a Wagner Safety Planer you'll have to regulate the speed to below 800 rpm or so. I do have a variable speed control that will go all of the down to zero rpm's. I saw a spot for the Wagner Safety Planer (not in stock) at Woodcrafter's and they get over $50. I'll definitely check out the deal at Woodworker.com Looks interesting.
     
  10. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Every tool I have has a zero RPM setting. :D
     
  11. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I will also say the running knotty pine through a planer may or may not turn out well. The blades may loosen the knot up, and it will simply fall out created a big hole.
     
  12. Phaze

    Phaze Tele-Holic

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    We had a heavy-duty thickness planer in a quite extensive shop while I was at the U of Il (ca. 1980), which I tried to use on a mahogany body I was building with a curly maple top. Kept getting tear-outs where the grain changed direction in the maple. I improvised a router sled similar to Scatter's, and found success. It took a little while to gather materials and jig it up, and run through some trials and some tweaking, but, by god, it worked great! I used a hand scraper (a deceptively simple but effective finishing tool, especially with the hard flamey maple) to remove the mill marks--minimal sanding required.

    Sniping (where the wood dips or is deflected by the pinch rollers at the beginning or end of the pass) is also a problem to consider with planers.

    So there you go. We don't need no stinkin' fancy shmancy high dollar floor tools!
     
  13. Phaze

    Phaze Tele-Holic

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  14. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity

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    Yeah... and they sure make a mess quickly... I used mine once... trying to join some boards... not good.
     
  15. mchet

    mchet Tele-Holic

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    Thanks everyone!!! I am going to try Scatter Lee's jig. Got a good platform to start from, will post pics later this week.
     
  16. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Yup I bought mine thinking it was going to be the greatest thing since peanut butter. Worthless for joining, I can't keep it straight or keep it from dipping/sinpping. If the wood isn't straight to start with, well, things get messy quick. But hey, if the door is sticking in the jam, I can fix that bad boy in about 30 seconds.
     
  17. Jack Wells

    Jack Wells Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    When the power planers first came on the scene I thought they were really cool too. A flight attendant friend of mine picked up a Makita for me in Japan. It's got the Japanese nomenclature on it. She also picked up a little mount that was suppose to make it work like a jointer. Those weren't allowed to be sold here because of safety issues. Needless to say it's gathering dust .......... and not dust of its own making.

    I've used mine doing some house remodeling and managed to hit some nails with it so it's only useful now for very rough work.
     
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