Just Completed Rehab

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by wadeeinkauf, Dec 10, 2019.

  1. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Holic

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    2nd Rehab on this Koa Guitar.

    This was my entry in the 2014 build challenge and my first build.
    2.jpg

    I modified it with a better idea for the bridge using a lefty bridge and did some experimenting with pickups.

    1a.jpg

    I have built 4 multiscales and have come to the conclusion for me I prefer the single scale. Strings and pickups are designed for the single scale. On my multiscales I had a 2 inch spread from 25 to 27. This makes the base strings have more tension and in my experience makes it harder to balance the output of all the strings….loud base strings and very little way to adjust on single coils. Multiscales seemed like a good idea but have their own set of problems. They did make me appreciate the zero fret and I now incorporate that is all my builds.


    So….I wanted to get some use out of this koa body and I really like this pickup configuration. Koa wood is very heavy and I had not chambered this guitar…this being my first build…The original build was a koa drop top on alder. I planed down the alder back and glued up a mahogany back for it. I chambered the koa as much as possible. Had this piece of mahogany in the shop. I no longer use mahogany in my new builds. The quality of the mahogany we get here in California is not very good. The local furniture makers in the area have all switched to sapele so I have as well. After my mods the rehabbed guitar came in at 7.83 lbs. I shoot for 7.5 lbs on my builds so this is not too bad. I had this neck from another earlier build that I was not happy with so I salvaged it. There are a few cosmetic flaws in this but it plays really well with really good action at 1.5mm string height at the 17th fret.
    2a.jpg 20191210_154806.jpg 20191210_154721.jpg

    The pickups.
    4.jpg

    For the neck pickup I have two Bill and Becky Lawrence single coil (noise free) pickups. One is a neck strat pickup and one tele neck pickup. These are mounted in an slotted humbucker cover. I have them wired in series with the ability to “coil split “ (ground out one of the pickups and get back to a standard single coil neck pickup). The bridge pickup is also a Wilde noise free. I have a push pull pot on the tone control pot. Pulling up grounds out the the second single coil in the neck.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2019
  2. Dan German

    Dan German Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I like the neck “humbucker” solution!
     
  3. Deeve

    Deeve Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Beautiful top (and back) there - I still haven't played a fanned fret instrument, and the explanation about the pup and string tension is new information for me.
    Peace - Deeve
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2019
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  4. kbold

    kbold Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Although I don't have a zero fret guitar, the concept always appealed to me.
    I'm surprised it isn't used more often.

    Nice builds.
     
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  5. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Holic

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    One of the advantages of fanned frets you often hear is: “ Fanned frets affect string tension, which is a big part of playability. The big benefit of fanned frets is that they increase string tension in the lower strings without affecting the higher strings.” Where this may be important is if you are using drop D or drop G (Stones Keith Richards tuning). It is said that on one of Keith’s teles he has removed the 6th base string…No problem if you carry 12 guitars for your gigs. For the rest of us….strings are designed to a certain tension when tuned to the common scale of our “normal” guitars. Gibson 24.75…fender 25.5.. On a Fender short scale (Mustang) 24 inches 10s would have less tension than on a higher scale so to get higher tones (and back to the tension you are use to on a 25.5 scale guitar you might go to 11s or 12s……So on your drop d or drop g tuning on a 25.5 scale guitar you could “compensate” the low tensioned 6th string by changing out the 46 to a 52 diameter string…In others words you do not need a fanned fret guitar to compensate for string tension, just work with the different string diameters until you find what works for you. Also pickups are designed for our standard..ish guitars to get a balanced level…..that is why on my fanned fret guitars my base strings “over boosted” the pickup drowning out the higher strings. You would need a pickup designed for multiscale to get the best results…..or fuss with adjusting the poles in a humbucker and see if there is enough range to compensate.
     
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  6. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Holic

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    If in your junk box you have some old single coils laying around give this a try. Here was my thinking. I love the tones of the tele neck single coil…love the old 50s and 60s R&B Steve Cropper, Stax and Hi Records, Tennie Hodges,
    Jimmy Johnson (Muscle Shoals) and so on…But I also wanted that fatter humbucker sound for rhythm. This setup worked great. What I do now to get close to this sound is use Seymour Duncan’s Little 59s or Pearly Gates and have parallel switching. You can go to full single coil mode by grounding the first coil in the humbucker but if you do this you will not have “noise free”….For me the parallel mode is close enough and you still have noise cancelling. Also if you try this I got slotted humbucker covers from ebay…the closed covers did not work for me…the pickups sounded very muffled and are not useable. Not sure what medal the covers were made of. You will have to grind off the plastic mounting ears in order to fit in the covers.

    Wade
     
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  7. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    beautiful work there , I wish i had your talent ( except the guitars would be lefty) :lol::lol::lol::lol:
     
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  8. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    +1 I like that 'humbucker' mod. There is a custom shop Robbie Robertson Strat where the middle pickup is pushed against the bridge pickup like a humbucker. A push pull brings in series humbucker and the 5-way works like normal. I have been thinking of this RR mod with the Armstrong blender I use on my Strats, SSS blends to HSH and the 5-way works with the normal pattern. So it's easy to remember.

    The reverse angle bridge pickup is a mod I did in one of my Strats and I like it. A completely different tone set.

    As for your multi-scale neck string tension variation problem ... you might try a left handed headstock so the longer strings get more string length above the nut which will give a more slinky feel to them.

    .
     
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  9. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    on your first pics ,how did you find the angled frets to play? wouldnt chording be a little weird? also would the tuning be offset for the E-1, B-2, G3 ? or would it lend to micro toning?
    I had seen that before but have never played one

    cool build!
     
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  10. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Holic

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    Yes I think I saw your build or picture using the lefty bridge that made me try it. It works great and is a easy and economical solution for the bridge for anyone wanting to try it.
     
  11. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Holic

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    I used the website www.ekips.org. I printed out the layout on my fretboard and cut by hand on the fretlines. You tune normally and intonation comes in fine...No problems. There are many ways to layout the angles of the frets. You choose which fret you want to be the parallel fret...I think I used the 9 fret on this build...that will dictate the angles along with the scale range. I think the 2 inches I used was an overkill but I had no experience with multiscales when I built this. Back to your question about chording...it can be easier to chord if the angels correspond to how your hand holds/fits/grips the neck. The problem I found was on leads...If you only played the multiscale it might be ok but switching back from normal guitar to it caused me a problem....Just did not work for me. Ibanez has a current line of multiscale basses with a 34 to 35.5 inch spread. Anyone that plays this bass please let us know how it works out.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2019
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  12. erratick

    erratick Tele-Holic

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    Multiscale is more helpful on bass- the best use is low B which is usually a floppy string with very different feeling tension than EADG. Or if you are doing a very high range instrument incorporating guitar and bass range to even out the tension.

    Dingwall also has some nice basses with the multi scale.

    I can't really play them as I'm too used to 4 string bass. But guys like Charlie Hunter sure can play the daylights out of them.

    I expect you are right about having to switch to that type only. Maybe even one instrument or two identical ones only to build up the muscle memory.

    BTW the original and your rebuild are beautiful. I really like that pickup config and those specific pickups on v2. Nice stuff.
     
  13. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Holic

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    Thank you....and thanks for info on basses.
    Wade
     
  14. Deathray

    Deathray Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Beautiful job on that guitar!
    I do have to admit the title made me think of a Steely Dan song:
    “Three weeks out of the rehab, livin’ one day at a time. What a shame about me.”
     
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  15. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Holic

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  16. Deathray

    Deathray Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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  17. ScottMosesMurray

    ScottMosesMurray TDPRI Member

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    Nice work. Zero fret is a good choice! I have fan fret on an acoustic... Lets me tune down to D or D# while using medium strings.

    Check out Rivet pickups. Dave Petschulat has a unique (patented) way of solving the humbug vs single coil dilemma.
    https://rivetpickups.com/product/rivet-63-64t-pickup-set/
     
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  18. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Holic

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    Hay....Thanks for the info I will have to study a bit to see what is going on with these pickup but I really like the look of them.
     
  19. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Holic

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    I did some research on this when I first started making multiscales. There is a lot of opinion out there on the related area of string through the body versus top load or a floating bridge types and the effect each has on string tensions. Related is the “down angle” on the E and B string on a tele using string trees. What I remember is that tension is a function of scale and construction of the string. The tension remains the same no matter what the down angle is or the length of the string after the nut or after the bridge. I remember doing some testing. To my surprise when I took my tele string trees off for a test after re-tuning the tension did feel the same as with the trees. What is your thinking on this?

    Wade
     
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