Just bought a Twin Reverb...

brookdalebill

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There’s perfectly good reasons why they were/are the industry standard.
The sound great, they’re dependable, and they take pedals well.
They also sound full at moderate volume, or can fill a large-ish venue without reinforcement.
They’re all I used till about a dozen years ago.
My old back (discectomy), belly (hernia), and right knee (torn miniscus) just say “no” now.
Congratulations!
 

geetah

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Fantastic, they get a great sound even at low volumes. I still take my '73 out to gig every now and again - it's on wheels. I usually gig with my AC15 but that's not the lightest amp either.
 

Cosmic Cowboy

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I think the twin may be the best stage amp out there for the kind of sound I do. But they are biggins.

I started with a 70s SF twin from my uncle Tom in San Diego who had gear but hadn't played in years. Best gift ever as a 14 y.o.

Nothing sounds like a Fender amp. The Digital stuff sounds ok, but nothing like having a big 2x12 at the jam, or on stage opened up and cooking.

I have had many night that I never stepped on a pedal. Just amp and guitar with some on-board verb and some tremolo for a few numbers.

Congrats. I'm glad you dig it. A 45 Watt Super is a Killer amp too. And a Deluxe, and a Bassman, Princeton, Vibroverb, and Harvard, Tweed Deluxe, Blues Deluxe...the list goes on. But for most gigging blues, country, rock and R&B cats....it's still the twin.
 

Back at it

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If you want a bit of nirvana, borrow a ps-2 and put that inbetween the amp and speakers and crank it up, use the ps-2 to keep the cops away ….

you’ll know why it exists and why you want to crank it up
 

Gnometowner

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True story, Kansas City Blues guitarist Buck Brown was carrying his Twin up the stairs of the old Blaney's basement bar in Westport. The amp got away from him, broke tibia and fibula and ripped tendons in his ankle. He went home and went to bed and his brother found him dead in his bed. Passed a blood clot.
Soooo Fender Twins can be dangerous, consider yourselves warned, you gotta be tough to live as a blues guitarist
 

Old Verle Miller

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Back in the 60's when you showed up with a TR it gave you stage cred, especially if you had those shiny JBL's in it. When you stacked it on top of a Dual Showman cabinet also with JBL's it told everyone you had more money than good sense. You could also ruin everyone's hearing and the house-sound guys hated not being in control of it.
 

Teleguy61

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Back in the 60's when you showed up with a TR it gave you stage cred, especially if you had those shiny JBL's in it. When you stacked it on top of a Dual Showman cabinet also with JBL's it told everyone you had more money than good sense. You could also ruin everyone's hearing and the house-sound guys hated not being in control of it.
Back in the 80s, I played--and still have--a 64 BFTR with gray frame JBLs in it.
It sounded fabulous.
I can't even lift it now, and that's without the JBLs in it.
It sounded fabulous.
 

Milspec

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There’s perfectly good reasons why they were/are the industry standard.
The sound great, they’re dependable, and they take pedals well.
They also sound full at moderate volume, or can fill a large-ish venue without reinforcement.
They’re all I used till about a dozen years ago.
My old back (discectomy), belly (hernia), and right knee (torn miniscus) just say “no” now.
Congratulations!
I know the feeling, mine has JBL speakers and the giant UL transformer. When I walked out of my tech's shop with it I swung it around the door to give room to a person walking in and it about threw me to the ground. Thankfully, the dude walking in grabbed me or else me and the amp would have spilled across the sidewalk....and I am 6'4 at 225 lbs, but that 100 lbs plus swung a few feet from the body was violently heavy.
 

Flaneur

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I take my Twin to gigs, sometimes. Unknown venues- especially outdoor ones- for example.
I play with two bands. One of the drummers is half my age, the other, fifteen years younger. Rule One: always be on good terms, with your drummer. Especially the guy who can lift your amp, with one hand. :cool:
 

Mowgli

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True story, Kansas City Blues guitarist Buck Brown was carrying his Twin up the stairs of the old Blaney's basement bar in Westport. The amp got away from him, broke tibia and fibula and ripped tendons in his ankle. He went home and went to bed and his brother found him dead in his bed. Passed a blood clot.
Soooo Fender Twins can be dangerous, consider yourselves warned, you gotta be tough to live as a blues guitarist
Falls, any type, anywhere, regardless of whether you are moving a piano or nothing at all, can break bones and cause lethal or life-altering injuries. Hip fractures are especially common with the elderly, especially women who tend to have osteoporosis more than men.

Point? if you have to move heavy stuff upstairs get a good hand truck and, as needed, another person to help you move it. My wife is older than me and on the “I don’t like manual labor” bandwagon lately. But she recently helped me move a very heavy rack upstairs where we were able to rest on each step. This thing was much heavier than a twin. We took care to do things safely. That’s the point. Do what you can to avoid accidents. Ask for help. Macho men look pretty stupid when they don’t ask for help and end up regretting the decision.

Lastly, when I was a teen, one of my local guitar heroes used to play a strat clean through a UL MVol Twin and he always sounded great. Great touch. Nuanced phrasing that was jaw dropping. From his example I personally think those UL MVol Twins get a bad rap; they are clean machines that sound great. They may not be BF twins but for sparkling cleans they were impressive especially when pushed.
 

Gnometowner

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Falls, any type, anywhere, regardless of whether you are moving a piano or nothing at all, can break bones and cause lethal or life-altering injuries. Hip fractures are especially common with the elderly, especially women who tend to have osteoporosis more than men.

Point? if you have to move heavy stuff upstairs get a good hand truck and, as needed, another person to help you move it. My wife is older than me and on the “I don’t like manual labor” bandwagon lately. But she recently helped me move a very heavy rack upstairs where we were able to rest on each step. This thing was much heavier than a twin. We took care to do things safely. That’s the point. Do what you can to avoid accidents. Ask for help. Macho men look pretty stupid when they don’t ask for help and end up regretting the decision.

Lastly, when I was a teen, one of my local guitar heroes used to play a strat clean through a UL MVol Twin and he always sounded great. Great touch. Nuanced phrasing that was jaw dropping. From his example I personally think those UL MVol Twins get a bad rap; they are clean machines that sound great. They may not be BF twins but for sparkling cleans they were impressive especially when pushed.
You totally missed the irony of a Blues Guitar player's demise by amplifier, certainly not in the league of being shot by a jealous husband or stabbed by a woman........
.
 




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