Just a couple of questions 'cause I'm kinda stalled...

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by NotAnotherHobby, Aug 2, 2016.

  1. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

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    Question / Inquiry #1:

    I'm in the middle of making my truss rod slot jig. Everything looks good but with one exception: I don't have a plunge router. Mine is fixed. Typically the way I go about routing something is to drill a hole using a forstner bit in the middle of the cavity I want to route, roughly to the depth I want to route, and then that's my starting point. But this is a neck. It'll be under strain. Doing that may weaken the neck. AND, I can't put it at the end, because this is a hotrod dial-action truss rod, so I'll need to silicon it into place. Too much space at one end and the truss may not work properly.

    So the question is: how do I go about creating a starting point for my router bit? My thoughts are to place a slightly oversized hole at the heel just about 1/2" above where the heel-end of the truss starts (the adjustment will be at the headstock). Does that sound OK, or does anyone have any pointers as far as this situation?

    Question / Inquiry #2:

    I want to start priming and painting my bodies before Fall gets here. My biggest impediment is drilling the string-thru holes as this requires a proper bridge placement. I'm good with the Son of the D'OHcaster as I have a pre-fab neck. But the original project - the D'OHcaster - is still awaiting the neck before I can place the bridge. I've done some rough placement, but in retrospect I'd feel better about putting in the bridge AFTER I have the neck complete, and everything can be lined-up properly.

    Outside of placing the bridge, and the string-through holes, I'm essentially done on the D'OHcaster body.

    So my question is, should I paint the body before the neck is complete, or do I wait (which may mean that I don't paint until next year)?

    And I am learning a lesson here that you should probably start and complete the neck before starting on the body. Because the Son of the D'OHcaster thus far has relatively been a piece of cake when it comes to fabricating the body.
     
  2. Moldy Oldy

    Moldy Oldy Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    I think you're over thinking it. (I do that all the time.) I don't use a plunge router either. I just tilt the router at a slight angle so the bit is not touching as I turn it on. Then drop the router down flat to manually plunge it. You're only going about 1/8" deep with each pass anyway. It won't be perfect, but it's all covered by the fretboard anyway. Assuming you don't make a huge crater, you don't need to worry about weakening the neck. It will be fine.

    Regarding body and neck, if I painted the body before I located and drilled the string through holes, I'd definitely end up scratching up or denting the paint job. YMMV
     
  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'd start at the heel end where it will be hidden. Pre drill a 1/4 hole in the heel end and work toward the peghead... strength will not be sacrificed. The whole slot and fretboard support the rod. Do it in a few increments so you sneak up on the 7/16" depth. I use a router table and just tilt drop the neck onto the table against the fence. I cut in a direction that pushes the neck into the fence, not away from it. I'd even start outside the neck and work inward unless you are concerned about seeing the piece of wood missing there under the fretboard. The hot rod truss rod is supposed to be removable if you make the slot open ended.

    http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Onlin...and_Repair/Hot_Rod_Adjustable_Truss_Rods.html
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2016
  4. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

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    I really can't do that with this router. The placement of the switch, and the jolt it creates when it kicks on it a bit much, and can make it prone to me losing my grip on the handles (I have three ruined templates to testify to this). I literally have to hold on to this thing with both hands if I don't want to damage anything. A slightly oversized pilot hole is really a better option because it is far easier to keep it under control with a decent amount of downward pressure.

    I'll try this with a piece of scrap, but I'm not real optimistic.
     
  5. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

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    So, let me see if I got this right - start from outside the heel and route straight up to the stopping point near the headstock?

    And if I am imagining this correctly, as the trussrod bends one way or another, doesn't it apply pressure outward? Wouldn't I need wood at the heel where he end presses against?
     
  6. nosmo

    nosmo Friend of Leo's

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    When I rout for a HS adjust 2-way TR, I use a router table with a fence set up. If this is a Fender style neck, you may need to make a shim to keep one edge straight. Rout from the HS end and stop at the heel end of the TR. Stop the router, then lift the neck off the bit. Repeat as necessary to get the depth you need. You will need to rout a slightly larger groove for the adjustment. If it's clean enough, you're done. If not, you can install a TR cover.

    By the way, Bitterroot TR's use a 1/4" rout (and a 1/4 round nose bit is perfect). Hot Rod's use a little bit bigger rout. Don't remember what is needed for the adjustment.
     
  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The truss rod applies pressure at the ends in an up and down direction It also moves in the center of the arc when under tension and compression. Put the wrench in the nut and turn it to see what it does.

    Proper routing on a router table against a fence is feeding wood into the direction of rotation. If you do this you need to apply pressure to the wood against the fence to avoid it moving away from the fence. Obviously the way you hold the neck is going to come into play here.

    Here's my take on what you are trying to do. I'd rout from the heel end and stop at the peghead end, assuming you want a cleaner end to the slot. Any slop from starting out will be at the heel under the fretboard. If you do it the other way, then you risk having slop at the adjustment cavity. It's hard to guess what you are really wanting to do here and where your machined edge is...if you have a machined edge.

    This may be a useful link...practice on scrap and follow all safety rules for your application.


    http://www.woodcraft.com/articles/605/understanding-router-feed-direction.aspx
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2016
    DrASATele likes this.
  8. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    ^ I'd do the router table way too if possible. I get a much more consistent channel in several passes that way.
     
  9. Preacher

    Preacher Friend of Leo's

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    I agree with guitarbuilder, drill your starting hole in the heel, when you make your skunk stripe just add a little extra to the end and make that circle fit your Fornster bit size. It will be hid but will also look like you knew what you were doing.
     
  10. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

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    I gotta chuckle out of the last sentence. I don't want to go THAT far, now do I? :)
     
  11. NotAnotherHobby

    NotAnotherHobby Tele-Afflicted

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    I'm beginning to think I need to pull out my router table. I guess I could tape the neck to a piece of scrap, or use screws to secure it in place. I loathe to do that seeing that I have so very little space in my workshop area. But oh well.

    Anyone have any opinion on the second question I asked? About drilling holes for the bridge and string-thru holes after a finish is applied?

    Oh, and for your general entertainment, a song From Kansas. Note the guitar played at 5:40:

     
  12. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Sounds like you kinda need to do something to control the torque force of your router, be it attach your neck to a jig that guides the router up the neck, or use a router table as described above. This is one of those "pay me now, or pay me later" situations--it may be a nuisance and involve a lot of digging, clearing off surfaces, and so forth to use your router table, but trying to control a torquey router beast freehand or with just one makeshift fence has a very high fail potential, even catastrophe. (the difference is that fail involves wood chips from where you don't want them, catastrophe involves your blood)

    As far as drilling thru-holes and other holes on a finished body, no doubt it CAN be done, but there are a bunch of ways for it to go south on you. Even if you mask all but the "surgical field" with cardboard and several layers of masking tape, always a chance a drill bit will catch the finish layer and bust off a chip, something falls on the guitar making a ding (bad enough on an unfinished guitar, but major refin on a finished one.) Also, if you use the center-pin and drill press method of locating and drilling through holes, it would be very difficult to move the guitar over the locating pins without denting or scratching finish already applied. Again, probably could be done, but personally, I'd wait, or at least go no further than sealer and primer coats, then do color and clear or what ever final finish after the holes are drilled.
     
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