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Jointing Timber

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Redevo, Jun 28, 2012.

  1. Redevo

    Redevo TDPRI Member

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    Hi
    I'm about to start Project No 2 , but this time i want to make the body rather than use a bought one , i don't have access to a planer/jointer so would it be possible to do it with a router with a straight cutting bit and the adjustable guide taking a couple of mm's off .

    I have 2 6ft planks of pine 8ins wide x 44mm that i got from a demolition job years ago it's been in my shed for 8 or 9 years , cut into 18in lengths there's enough for 4 bodies , so any advice would be great , Thanks .
     
  2. Picton

    Picton Friend of Leo's

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    If you're comfortable with handplanes, they're the tool for jointing. If you're not, though, I guess I'd suggest a table-mounted router. Make sure the bit is sharp.
     
  3. jb12string

    jb12string Tele-Afflicted

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    Is there a cabinet shop local to you? They could probably joint it for you and shouldn't charge you much.
     
  4. whodatpat

    whodatpat Friend of Leo's

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    Find a cabinet shop near you. Tell them what you are doing and ask them if they will run two short boards through their planer for you. 99% change they will be excited to help you build a guitar and will tell you to come by and they wont charge you a thing. At least that is my experience.
     
  5. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'd imagine it would work, but I'm wondering how much of a glue line you would end up with. I wonder if the rigidity is there to get a perfectly flat surface? Try it and see.
     
  6. Warem

    Warem Tele-Meister

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    In my wallcaster build I used a router, and then slightly sanded the boards by sticking some sandpaper with double sided tape to a straight table. Worked very well.
    Good luck with your build.
     
  7. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I joined these 3 pieces of Oregon rafter with an old hand plane...

    I got the fit as close as I could without spending hours on it... checking the gaps up against the light.... then glued it with titebond...

    the glue lines weren't as bad as I thought they might be...:)
     

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  8. Redevo

    Redevo TDPRI Member

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    Thanks for the reply's

    I checked Yellow Pages nobody within a 20miles radius , they would'nt do it for nothing charge would be £20 - £30 , i forgot to mention timber is vanished so i'd have to strip that first before they'd touch it , i'll give the router a try if that does work it's cost me nothing .
     
  9. Thumposaurus

    Thumposaurus TDPRI Member

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    If you have a good sharp table saw blade and a good fence check how tight the joint is after ripping a piece off of one side and putting that flat side against the fence and running it again. You might be surprised, I've glued up 3 or 4 bodies straight off of the saw with out any additional planing or jointing.
     
  10. Redevo

    Redevo TDPRI Member

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    If i had a table saw there'd be no problem and i would'nt be trying to use a router , it's the cost of the power tools that's why i bought a ready made body before .
     
  11. LocustPlague

    LocustPlague Tele-Holic

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    You can't use the adjustable guide to get a straight line, as that would only index off of your already not-straight board. If you want to use a router for it, you likely want to attach a known straight edge to the board and use a pattern following bit.
     
  12. Redevo

    Redevo TDPRI Member

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    I've checked one side with of my Aluminium Straight Edge's and it's as straight as you'll get , i think the main problem with the router is to get enough pressure on the guide for it to run straight and true i think the router till tip as you run it , the timbers 2in wider than i need so room for a couple of trial passes
     
  13. LocustPlague

    LocustPlague Tele-Holic

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  14. joshwertheimer

    joshwertheimer TDPRI Member

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    I don't understand what you'll be running the guide against.

     
  15. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    You might consider a shout out to the other TDPRI members in the UK. If you were within driving distance of me, I'd gladly help you, but sadly you are a very long plane ride away:cry:

    I routinely use a #7 Stanley Jointer plane on bodies. I find that I can produce a tighter joint in pieces shorter than 36 inches than I can with a jointer. It takes some practice, but it is actually fun.
     
  16. '59_Standard

    '59_Standard Tele-Holic

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    It sounds like he's running a Guide Bushing against the Straight Edge, rather than a bearing against the SE.
     
  17. SixShooter

    SixShooter Friend of Leo's

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    I seriously think you need to find someone with the right tools for thejob. You may otherwise find yourself unhappy with the result. Keep looking for help. Ask in person not over the phone. Perhaps a highschool with a wood shop or a store selling wood and woodworking supplies?
     
  18. bubba105

    bubba105 Tele-Meister

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    http://www.5min.com/Video/How-to-Use-the-Router-Table-As-a-Jointer-302212484

    http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-T...lls/two-essential-saw-cutting-guides/View-All

    The internet is your friend. You're probably better off using a circular saw with this type of fence/guide. The flex from your applied pressure using a router bit on thick wood may cause a gap unless you can apply pressure only on the outfeed side. IMO, the circular saw with a straight edge guide will get you better results. A good sharp blade is the ticket. That & geometry. If your blade is tilted any degree off 90 you will get a gap. The way around this is to flip one of the boards lengthwise, then make your cut. Say it's off by one degree, you make your cut & the boards are off by one degree each, causing a two degree gap. However, if you flip one of the boards, the gap disappears. Confused? Draw it on paper with a large gap, say 45 degrees, it becomes apparent.
     
  19. macaroonie

    macaroonie Friend of Leo's

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    Here's how you do it.

    Router mounted upside down in a flat surface. Use a new 12.5 mm x 2" kitchen fitters cutter. You guide should be as shown. The timber will run as straight as the guide is. What you need to do is run the cuts as just the tiniest shave. Do not make the router do any hard work or it will deflect a little.
    Do successive minimum passes until you have a clean even cut over the length. You just need to ease the guide in a smidgeon at each pass.
    The wood has to run against the cutter blade rotation. You can do it the oher way but you run the risk of the cutter snatching and taking the wood for a trip across the room.

    I've done this tons of times for bodies and other purposes , works well.

    router edger.jpg

    cutting1.jpg

    Also you can use this rig for even sizing of multiple pieces of timber. If the guide stays put everything will come out the same size.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2012
  20. Keyser Soze

    Keyser Soze Tele-Holic

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    What Macaroonie recommends. Which essentially means building yourself an inexpensive router table, something that will prove endlessly useful over time.

    And also do what bubba suggests - mark the face of the two boards to be joined and run one face up and the other face down. Then when you glue them up join accordingly so that any angle cancels out.

    The only other thing I would add is to use a push stick to feed the stock, and stand to the side (not directly behind) the stock. Worse than a trip accross the room is for a board to take a trip into your hip/stomach. It doesn't happen often, but when it does it happens fast. Blink of an eye fast.

    After that it is clamps, clamps and more clamps.
     
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